Findlay Market, community stakeholders plan for pedestrian-friendly Pleasant Street


A number of community stakeholders are exploring different options for a pedestrian-friendly walkway that would link Washington Park and Findlay Market in Over-the-Rhine. Two events have been held to gather community input and demonstrate options, with suggestions including seating, lighting, a playground, murals, interactive art, food trucks and musical installations.
 
Pleasant Street, which is parallel to and between Elm and Race streets and crosses Liberty Street, runs north/south from Findlay Market to Washington Park. Right now there are crosswalks, but the area isn’t heavily traveled by pedestrians or bicyclists. With the increased focus on development in and around Findlay Market, a pedestrian walkway would only add to the sense of community the neighborhood is attracting.
 
A community block party was held June 5 to start the conversation and get community members involved in the planning process. A follow-up event was held July 11 to showcase some of the improvements and designs that were developed by UC’s MetroLab with help from other planning, public art and ethics classes.
 
An ongoing public art project entitled “Alternate Steps” was installed, which follows the proposed walking path. The installation combines interviews with community members and photos of their feet, which were placed along the street to create a “walking path” of stories.
 
Another addition to the area is the Field of Greens, a wiffleball field in the 1500 block of Pleasant. It’s also serving as a working garden that will operate alongside Findlay Market’s production gardens and help supplement what’s produced there.
 
Seats made from old tires have been added along the path, and MetroLab has also designed an outdoor kitchen made from recycled plastic baskets that will be installed soon.
 
The ultimate goal is close Pleasant Street to cars at least some of the time. Elder Street, which borders Findlay Market on one side, is closed to cars during market hours and reopens after market hours. Closing Pleasant wouldn’t be tied to market hours, though — the idea is to make the area a safe, friendly place for pedestrians and bicyclists.
 
Join the conversation: What do you want to see on Pleasant Street?
 

Read more articles by Caitlin Koenig.

Caitlin Koenig is a Cincinnati transplant and 2012 grad of the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri. She's the department editor for Soapbox Media and currently lives in Northside with her husband, Andrew, and their three furry children. Follow Caitlin on Twitter at @caite_13.  
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