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MU holiday performance to benefit Walnut Hills marching band


Twenty-four Miami University vocalists and a 16-member big band will join together onstage at Walnut Hills High School's newly renovated auditorium this weekend to perform “A Swingin’ Holiday: Big Band Choral Spectacular.” A portion of the proceeds from the performance will benefit Walnut Hills’ music department, which has “an astounding reputation,” according to MU’s Ben Smolder.
 
“Walnut Hills High School is full of brilliant and diverse children that have the pleasure of studying in the finest high school in the state of Ohio,” says Smolder, who will director and conduct the show. 
 
Smolder serves as Director of Miami Opera Theater, which launched a fundraiser in support of Walnut Hills’ marching band, selected by Youth Music of the World to participate in the 2016 Paris New Year's Day Parade.
 
“Being from rural Appalachia, I was deeply shaped by a similar experience in early life that led to a lifetime of travel and a deep desire to understand other cultures,” Smolder says.
 
This weekend's performance is a way to help others but also to add joy to audience members’ holiday season.
 
“Our goal was to recreate the musical specials that would appear on TV and radio during the Christmas season from the 1940s to the 1960s,” Smolder says. “One cannot hear this music without being transported back to a time when we were surrounded by our loved ones and gazing at the evening sky in hopes of seeing Santa.”
 
Do Good:

•    “A Swingin’ Holiday: Big Band Choral Spectacular” will be performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Walnut Hills High School. Enter promo code “Santa” at the ticketing box office to receive a discount. 

•    Support the WHHS music program. 

•    Support WHHS students by volunteering.
 

Constella goes digital, aims to draw national audience to spring festival


As the Constella Festival of Music and Fine Arts gets ready to release the lineup for this April’s performances, the goal is to “target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati,” according to Tatiana Berman, internationally renowned violinist and festival founder.

The name “Constella,” which is derived from “constellation,” is significant to festival organizers because performers and audience members get the chance to connect with one another through music in an intimate setting.
 
“The international concept for Constella was always connecting people and ideas,” Berman says.
 
To do that even more effectively than past years, Constella has made the move of going digital.
 
Berman collaborated with Julie Spangler to compose, perform and record a video performance piece, “Vitali Variations,” and the second digital short, which will be released in March as a precursor to the festival, will feature Roomful of Teeth.
 
“We would like to think this kind of a beautifully produced video can connect a whole new audience in an informal way with music, which we are passionate about,” Berman says.
 
Through these visual musical collaborations that include Grammy award winners and emerging artists, Constella will be able to further its mission of challenging “misconceptions of classical music and the performing arts” by extending its reach to a worldwide audience.
 
“Through production of music videos, recordings and other digital content, we can expand our performance presentations,” Berman says. “It allows for people around the world to experience the power of music and the arts.”

Do Good:

•    Check the Constella Festival website Jan. 15 to view the festival lineup and purchase your tickets for April’s performances.

•    For sponsorship and volunteer opportunities, contact Rachael Moore.

•    Support Constella by donating. 
 

Local organist featured in Price Hill celebration of community, giving


Community members will join together at the Bloc Center Saturday evening in Price Hill to share musical talents, engage in fellowship and collect donations for neighbors in need.
 
A Night With Scott and Friends, the west side’s second annual community Christmas concert featuring Scott Elick — member of both the Cincinnati Organist Guild and Starfire Council's Out & About program — enables individuals to celebrate one another during a time of joy and thanksgiving.
 
Beneficiaries from the night’s donations include Manna Outreach in Price Hill and West Fork Christian Faith Fellowship’s Food Pantry.
 
“Now that I'm retired from full-time work, I really enjoy lending my musical talents to causes that benefit our local communities on the west side,” says Sheryl Pockrose, Covedale resident and folk singer.
 
For Elick, who has played organ since age 8, it’s one of the highlights of his season.
 
“Scott can play anything he hears,” says Danyetta Najoli, Starfire’s community coordinator. “It's truly an amazing gift.”
 
Elick says it's also important to him to give back to the west side — Price Hill in particular — because of his close ties to the neighborhood. Not only is it the location for the concert, but it’s also where his brother lives, and family is something for which he’s grateful.
 
“I feel connected to the community,” Elick says. “The people and their culture is something I have always been interested in. I want the people of Price Hill to enjoy the Christmas season, the music, the lights as much as I do.” 

Do Good: 

•    Attend "A Night With Scott & Friends" 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 13 at the Bloc Center, 931 McPherson Ave. in Price Hill.

•    Support your local food pantries. 

•    Connect with others year-round at events you're passionate or curious about by attending Local Learning Labs.
 

Cincinnati YMCAs aim to strengthen global community

In 2013, the YMCA of the USA, in cooperation with 40 different YMCA associations across the country, came up with a plan to expand efforts of global community building.
 
Now, one year later, the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati—one of the 40 associations involved in Y-USA’s efforts—is doing its part in the local community to ”create, strengthen and replicate innovative global services, partnerships and organizational practices at home and abroad” through its Global Center of Excellence.
 
“We really want to connect with our neighbors in our community in a much stronger way,” says Karyl Cunningham, executive director of the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati. “In a changing community, changing world, the Y’s mission has always been a movement about embracing people from different backgrounds and ethnicities, and supporting movements that are critical for the greater good of society.”
 
At the Clippard Y, which Cunningham says is one of the most “ethnically diverse” of Cincinnati’s 14 branches, members are gearing up for the Taste of the World tailgating event, where individuals bring in their favorite meal or dish to share with one another while engaging in conversation and watching football together.
 
“There’s going to be some learning opportunities that take place, and it should be a really great thing,” Cunningham says. “And as we move forward, we’re always going to have global community as a basic premise, so the Global Center of Excellence is one of those ways to keep that front and center for the work we do.” 

Do Good:

•    Support the Clippard Family YMCA by attending the Taste of the World tailgating event Nov. 16 from 12-3 p.m. The event is $10 per family or $5 per individual, and all proceeds help the Y further its mission. 

•    Learn about joining the Y

•    Support the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati by giving.
 

Photos at Skirball reveal history, transition of Cincinnati's West End

Sixty black-and-white photographs documenting the architecture, history and human experience of Cincinnati’s West End in the early-mid 20th century, are on display at Skirball Museum.
 
George Rosenthal, Daniel Ransohoff and Ben Rosen: Documenting Cincinnati’s Neighborhoods, which is part of FotoFocus, opened late last month, though photos remain on exhibit through December 21. And this Wednesday, community members are invited to a panel discussion with historians, scholars and community partners who are knowledgeable about the West End.
 
“The panel provides an opportunity to engage with people who have studied the West End, lived in the West End, written about the West End,” says Abby Schwartz, director of Skirball Museum and curator of the exhibition. “We hope to engage with these experts about the history of the neighborhood and the lessons we can learn from its demise, as well as have the opportunity to hear from those who knew the photographers whose works are in the exhibition.”
 
According to Schwartz, the photos on display tell a story about the “plight of urban neighborhoods” during times of transition.
 
“In the case of the West End, what was promised as urban revitalization really turned out to be a terrible chapter in the city's history, resulting in the destruction of an entire neighborhood and displacement of its inhabitants,” Schwartz says. “I think it presents an opportunity to think about what could have been done differently, and provides lessons going forward.” 

Do Good:

•    Attend Wednesday's panel discussion at 7 p.m. 

•    Check out the exhibition at Skirball Museum. Hours are here.

•    Check out other exhibitions that are part of FotoFocus Biennial 2014.
 

Local family to host fifth annual Rock 'n Aspire for MS

Simcha Kackley, founder of Rock ‘n Aspire, will host her fifth-annual event November 15 to generate funds for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
 
Since the first Rock ‘n Aspire concert in 2010, the grassroots effort has raised more than $20,000, but perhaps even more important for Kackley is that she has now created connections among families affected by MS.
 
“I had no idea of them before,” Kackley says. “Now we can go to each other and just know we understand each other.”
 
In February 2008, just one month before Kackley’s wedding, her husband Matt, who serves as a police officer in Hamilton County, woke up with numbness on the right side of his body.
 
He was later diagnosed with MS, though thankfully, Kackley says her husband’s case is a mild one, as Matt experiences one episode annually.
 
“It put everything back into perspective,” Kackley says. “We know we're very lucky because others have more challenges, and so we're thankful; but we have empathy with those who have it harder, because we remember bad episodes.”
 
To share that empathy and to bring people together for an evening of music is a goal of Rock ‘n Aspire, though the ultimate aim is to raise money to find a cure for MS.
 
“I know what it's like to not know what's going to happen—to be experiencing bad episodes and not know when or if they'll end,” Kackley says. “We've been lucky, but others aren't. And I'm just trying to bring people together who can relate, to use sound and the power of music to fill our fight against MS.” 

Do Good:

•    Purchase a ticket to attend Rock 'n Aspire.

•    Learn about ways you can support the National MS Society through Rock 'n Aspire.

•    Volunteer with Rock 'n Aspire.
 

First Impact Covington Day hailed a success

More than 200 volunteers came together last Saturday on Make a Difference Day—a national day of giving—to better the City of Covington.
 
It was the first of six Impact Covington days, which COV200—the group tasked with planning the city’s Bicentennial Celebration—initiated.
 
“We want to instill pride in the community,” says Amanda Greenwell, vice chair for the bicentennial. “And we think the best way to do that is for people to actually take part and make it a better place.”
 
The committee is now accepting applications for the second Impact Day, which will take place December 13.
 
“If an organization wants to do whatever—beautification, public art, social services—we have a database of volunteers and a pretty big network of people who say they want to get involved and give back,” Greenwell says.
 
This past weekend, volunteers did everything from painting to landscaping, but the next Impact Covington Day will deal specifically with work completed at social service organizations throughout the city.
 
“These events are great opportunities to actually meet your neighbors and get engaged with your community,” Greenwell says.
 
“Today with the digital age we’re in, people are really disconnected with our neighbors, so through the Bicentennial and all the events, we’re hoping to bring the community together as one to meet their neighbors and understand more about the city and the organizations that make it a better place.”
 
Do Good:

•    Submit your Impact Covington Day application by November 10 if you're a nonprofit in need. 

•    Attend one of the hundreds of events planned for Covington's Bicentennial Celebration.

•    Sign up to volunteer with COV200.


 

Mummies of the World to debut in Cincy, offers insight to past and present

‘Tis the season for all things Halloween, but it won’t just be Friday when mummies invade the Tri-State. 

Mummies of the World: The Exhibition opens at Cincinnati Museum Center November 26 and will run through April 26. 

“These mummies are borrowed from 10-12 institutions both in the U.S. and in Europe. Unless you’d go to all these places, you’d never have the chance to see them all in one place,” says Heather Gill-Frerking, biological anthropologist and curator of the exhibition. 

Gill-Frerking has studied mummies for about 20 years and has been with the exhibition since it was first developed in Germany. The exhibition contains both human and animal mummies, preserved both through natural and artificial mummification. 

The fact that some of these specimens are people and can tell us a story—even in their death—is a magical thing, Gill-Frerking says. 

There are three mummies, for example, from a crypt in Hungary, and all have tuberculosis, and may have even died from complications of the disease. 

“We know 65 percent of that town in 18th century Hungary had TB, so by studying the strain compared to what exists today, we know it’s getting angrier and has grown multidrug resistant. But by looking at differences, we can see how it transforms over time and maybe come up with treatments,” Gill-Frerking says. “So the fact that 18th century mummies can tell us about medical treatments is a very cool thing.” 

Do Good: 

•    Plan to attend Mummies of the World: The Exhibition. Tickets go on sale today.

•    Consider becoming a member of the museum.

•    Download the Mummies of the World learning guide here if you're an educator, and plan a class field trip. 
 

Kennedy Heights Arts Center to undergo expansion, provide more to local arts scene

It’s been a decade now since residents came together in an effort to save what was a crumbling, historic structure, slated for demolition, and which now houses the Kennedy Heights Arts Center.
 
Now, 10 years later, an even bigger transformation will occur, as the Arts Center breaks ground November 14 on construction for its second location and regional campus—the Kennedy Heights Arts Center Carl, Robert, Richard and Dorothy Lindner Annex
 
When completed next year, the building will allow the Arts Center to expand its offerings to the community in a variety of ways.
 
“In the Annex, we’ll have a multipurpose events center which will be home to different kinds of performing arts programs in theater, music and dance, and we’ll have a venue for classes and workshops,” says Ellen Muse-Lindeman, KHAC executive director.
 
“We’ll also be creating the Scripps Howard Media Center, which will allow us to expand our already popular arts education programs to offer classes in digital-based art—so, photography, video, animation, web design, graphic design and the like.”
 
There will also be space for 10 individual studios, which Muse-Lindeman says artists may choose to rent, providing them a space to work, which strengthens the arts community in the region.
 
The Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus will also house the Kennedy Heights Montessori Center, and it contains enough space for a third institution, as well.
 
“We see this as the crossroads—the core of our community—as it’s revitalized in this way,” Muse-Lindeman says. “It continues to bring a more positive image to the neighborhood, it attracts more people with it being a regional destination, and it encourages more development—more on neighboring properties—and we see this as being a catalyzing project that has lots of benefits in terms of all the services we’ll be bringing to residents.” 

Do Good: 

•    Celebrate the Arts Center's expansion by attending the November 14 groundbreaking.

•    Check out the Arts Center's various programs, and consider participating in one.

•    Learn about the various ways you can support the Arts Center.
 

Peaslee Neighborhood Center celebrates 30 years of community impact

In December 1984, a group of women—mostly composed of single moms—received keys to the former Peaslee School in Over-the-Rhine, after having led fundraising efforts to ensure their children access to quality education.

“They didn’t know where their positive steps would go, or how far that would extend for people in this community, but they just did it anyway and that’s inspiring to me,” says Jennifer Summers, executive director of Peaslee Neighborhood Center.
 
“It’s a narrative that’s not a typical narrative of low income people in our community, and that motivates me to make sure that there are consistently spaces in this community that are accessible to everybody across all types of backgrounds.”
 
Now, 30 years later, Peaslee is celebrating its space in the community that demonstrates how far the women’s positive reach has extended, in creating "a peaceful place,” where everyone in OTR is welcome and can learn from and through one another.
 
One of its particularly successful programs, and one that Summers says shows the ways in which social change is at work, is its community education partnership with the Miami University Urban Teaching Cohort.
 
“It brings people from the community—moms, volunteers, recent graduates of Cincinnati Public Schools—together to help educate young, new, potential teachers on the things they can’t learn in a book about teaching,” Summers says.
 
“So the college students see community members on a regular basis, and those relationships are formed over five or six years, so by the time that student is teaching in the local school here, they have a network of support so they can support the students in their classroom in a way that makes sense to them, that honors their experience and that is effective.”
 
One way relationships are formed is through bonding activities like quilting and storytelling.
 
“People connect across generations,” Summers says.
 
“You can’t create any kind of change collectively unless you can get comfortable enough with each other and comfortable enough to do challenging things together, and I feel like we’re leaning into that. We’re promoting basic enrichment and educational services to the community, and we’re reaching beyond that to say, ‘How do we build a world we don’t just function and survive in, but that everybody thrives in, so that our successes are tied together?'” 

Do Good: 

•    Help Peaslee celebrate 30 years by attending Peaslee Presents: A Place for Everybody on November 6.

•    If you're interested in putting together a team from your workplace or community group, volunteer to complete a project for Peaslee. 

•    Support Peaslee by donating.
 

Internationally renowned conductor returns to local, musical roots

Kazem Abdullah returned to his musical roots this weekend, as he made his conducting debut with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and May Festival Chorus.
 
Abdullah currently serves as generalmusikdirektor in Aachen, Germany, but he is a former member of the Cincinnati Symphony Youth Orchestra.
 
“I was living in Dayton [during my time with the CSYO], but all my training basically happened in Cincinnati,” Abdullah says. “I’d always wanted to play in a youth orchestra year-round.”
 
So from 1993-94 and 1995-96, Abdullah developed his talents as a clarinetist and played alongside other talented students and then-members of the CSO.
 
According to Abdullah, his time with the CSYO was not only musically engaging, but also healing.
 
When he was 11 years old and at Interlochen’s music camp, he received news that his brother had been mugged, shot and killed.
 
“It was a difficult time for me and my family, so it was a good thing to give my life a little bit more structure,” Abdullah says.
 
It helped Abdullah keep his mind occupied and focused on his passion, and it was also a formative experience for him, he says, as it was an opportunity to further his knowledge and continue on a path that would enable him to pursue music as a career and become an international talent.
 
“I’ve always loved Cincinnati,” Abdullah says. “I rehearsed with the CSO when I was a kid in the youth orchestra and always loved them, so to be able to actually work with them, it’s a really great honor and really great pleasure as a woodwind player.” 

Do Good:

•    Support Cincinnati's orchestras, choruses and musical programs by donating.

•    Support our performers by attending an upcoming performance

•    Learn about audition requirements for the CSYO.
 

Citizenship, opportunity through music at MYCincinnati

The ten hours a week MYCincinnati orchestra members spend together enables students to not only become talented musicians, but also increase self-confidence, build social skills, engage in citizenship, and express their creativity and passion.
 
Through participation in the orchestra, which is offered through Price Hill Will and modeled on El Sistema—a program that utilizes music as a vehicle for social change—residents of the area are provided with an instrument, high-quality instruction and an opportunity.
 
“Every family faces their own unique set of challenges, but they all want a better road to the future for their children,” says Laura Jekel, program director. “I believe MYCincinnati is that road.”
 
Since the program’s inception, one student has gone from having never touched a violin to being an accomplished instrumentalist who has worked her way into the School for Creative & Performing Arts’ top orchestra.

Another student turned down a free opportunity to go to Kings Island, because she didn’t want to miss a single day of camp this summer.
 
For Jekel, the program opens up “a world of potential” as soon as a student gets an instrument in his or her hand.
 
“We’re giving them the skills to transform their neighborhood,” Jekel says. “To forge relationships across barriers of race and language, and to lead their communities.” 

Do Good:

•    Support MYCincinnati.

•    Volunteer with MYCincinnati.

•    Enroll your child.

Impact 100 funds three grantees, enables transformation

At its annual awards ceremony last week, Impact 100 awarded $327,000 to three local nonprofits in the form of three $109,000 transformational grants—a record for the all-female philanthropic organization who awarded two $108,000 grants at last year’s event.  
 
The Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati, Price Hill Will’s MYCincinnati and Community Matters’ Washing Well project were this year’s recipients.
 
The funds will enable the LNGC to extend its reach by implementing its Adult and Children’s Basic Reading Programs in the Price Hill and Avondale Communities.
 
MYCincinnati (Music for Youth) will reach more students, as the organization can now double its hours of operation and expand its age-range offerings.
 
And Community Matters will now be able to implement its Washing Well project, which will enable the organization to build a laundromat to serve Lower Price Hill residents who currently have no easy access to laundry facilities.
 
“It's very amazing—humbling—to be part of it—inspiring—and just, wow,” says Lisa Kaminski, Impact 100 member and vice president. “I was part of the team that worked for years to break three grants and I'm a total jumble of emotions.”
 
Since its first grantee in 2002, Impact 100 has awarded $2.8 million to 25 nonprofits who are able to create “magic in their communities,” says Sharon Mitchell, Impact 100 president.
 
Cincinnati Community ToolBank and Welcome House of Northern Kentucky were this year’s other two finalists, and it’s always difficult, members say, to not be able to fund all five groups. But they aim to change that, as the organization continues to grow.
 
At the awards ceremony this year, enough pledges were made to enable Impact 100 to commit to again giving three grants next year, but the goal is to award four or even five, and certainly even more, in years to come.
 
“One of the someday-projects on my list is trying to capture the ripple effect of Impact 100,” Kaminski says. “The number of lives impacted by those who have received grants, and also the impact on those who were not granted one. We’ve already heard that Cincinnati ToolBank has gotten a 12-foot covered trailer donated—so, wow.” 

Do Good:

•    Join Impact 100 so you can help the organization further its reach in the community. 

•    If you're a nonprofit with a plan to transform lives through your work, check back Oct. 27 for information on how to apply for one of next year's grants

•    Spread the word about Impact 100 by connecting with the organization and sharing its Facebook page.
 

LADD, ReelPrograms to host award-winning photographer in preparation for ReelAbilities

World renowned former fashion photographer Rick Guidotti founded Positive Exposure in 1998 after he made it his mission to help others change the ways in which they see things, so in turn, they could begin to see change.
 
“As a fashion photographer, I was always told constantly who’s beautiful—who the model of the moment was—so I always stayed within those parameters of what was a restrictive beauty standard, and I was always told it was beautiful,” Guidotti says. “And as an artist, I don’t see beauty just on the covers of magazines. I see beauty everywhere.”
 
It was after leaving his studio that Guidotti says he saw a girl with albinism who was “just beautiful.” He had never met a model who looked like her, he says, so he began to research individuals with albinism to see what he could find.
 
“I found nothing but horrible images—kids in their underwear up against walls in doctors’ offices, images of just disease, sickness—I didn’t see any photographs of this gorgeous kid,” Guidotti says. “And it’s always ‘the evil albino’ that we see depicted in movies, in Hollywood—every representation I could find was a negative. And it was so upsetting and so eye opening.”
 
So Guidotti partnered with the National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation to make something beautiful and show the world something different, he says.
 
“So this girl walks in the room and she was amazing—she was so beautiful, but she walked in with her shoulders all the way up, no eye contact—she had zero self esteem, and I can only imagine the abuse she had in school, the teasing” Guidotti says.
 
“I didn’t know what to do—she was so vulnerable—but just the day before, I had photographed Cindy Crawford, and I said out of respect for her, ‘I’m going to photograph her like I’d photograph anyone else,’ so the fan went on, the music went on, and I took a mirror and said, ‘Christine, look at you—you’re magnificent—and she looked in the mirror and she saw it. Her hands went on her hips, and she exploded with the smile that lit up New York City. It was incredible.”
 
It’s this beauty that Guidotti sees because of the shared humanity we all possess, he says, and it’s what’s inspired him to shift his lens from fashion photography to individuals who are portrayed as being diseased or disabled, but who are nothing short of amazing.
 
And that’s the clientele that Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled works with everyday on the local level, as well as the mission of the ReelAbilities Film Festival, which the organization will present Feb. 27-March 7.
 
As part of the organization’s ReelPrograms leading up to the festival, Guidotti will speak to local schools, share his story, exhibit Positive Exposure, The Spirit of Difference at FotoFocus, and photograph local families with physical and mental disabilities to add to his collection, which will be displayed during ReelAbilities.
 
“It’s inclusion, and it’s happening concurrently, but it’s individuals everywhere in the world that don’t want to be seen as diseased or as a diagnosis,” Guidotti says. “We all want to be seen as human beings.” 

Do Good:

•    Hear Guidotti's story, and check out his work, as well as other events taking place through ReelProgram events. This Cincinnati tour of Rich Guidotti is presented by the Edwards Foundation managed by Crew Capital with support from Contemporary Cabinetry East.

•    Support Cincinnati ReelAbilities by donating.

•    Spread the word about ReelAbilities and all of the events coming up by volunteering.
 

Kadish family remains hopeful with support of Team Ethan

The past year has been what Ethan Kadish’s mother, Alexia, calls “a tremendous rollercoaster ride.”
 
Last summer, Ethan was nearing the age of 13. He shared a love for sports and musical theater and was the type of boy who his mother says, “everyone considered a friend.”
 
At camp, however, he sustained a serious injury, as he was struck by lightning on a clear June day.
 
“We’re very hopeful for his future, but realize it is going to take a long, long time to know where we’re going,” Alexia says. “So we continue to push forward every single day.”
 
Since the time of his injury, Ethan has spent months in and out of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, and his family has incurred more than 1 million dollars in medical expenses for therapies not covered by insurance.
 
But since mid-April, Ethan has been able to remain at home, and this August, he returned to school, as the family hopes to provide him with as many opportunities to stimulate his brain as possible.
 
And every little bit helps.
 
“When he was in the hospital last summer, he was going through this neurological episode the doctors call ‘storming,’” Alexia says. “And it’s basically where one’s brain is just trying so hard to fire up and make connections, and what results is a lot of agitation, frustration, confusion; and for Ethan, that came out in a lot of kind of moaning and crying.”
 
But thanks to medical treatments, various therapies and a community of volunteers who have supported the family through their work with Team Ethan, Ethan is now in a much better state of being.
 
“Ethan’s movements aren’t would I would call yet deliberate. He has movements, but they’re more reflexive versus purposeful. But he’s working so hard, and he’s vocalizing,” Alexia says. “We feel like he’s working so hard at his first words, and we’re very anxious to hear what those are going to be.”
 
Ethan, now 14, celebrated his birthday this past July at the Cincinnati Pops’ Broadway Sing-Along, and for the Kadish family, it was a celebration that, like many other everyday moments, reaffirms their hope for continued improvement in their son’s health.
 
“It was so cool and so up his alley, and the emotion on his face was just tremendous,” Alexia says. “He would smile really big, and his eyes just sparkled. It’s times like that we really just feel connected with him.” 

Do Good:

•    Support Ethan by donating to his fund at HelpHOPELive.

•    Read about ways to Help Team Ethan.

•    Support the Kadish family by attending Penny Friedman's art show September 12 and 21 at A. Maris Design. Friedman, an energy healer, has spent hundreds of hours volunteering with Team Ethan, and 10 percent of each painting sold will be donated to Ethan's fund at HelpHOPELive. Keep up with Team Ethan's Facebook page for details.
 
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