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Cincinnati Food + Wine Classic returns with another star-studded collection of chefs


Washington Park becomes one big kitchen for the Cincinnati Food + Wine Classic throughout the weekend of Sept. 11-13, the event's second year of hosting the best food and beverage flavors in the Midwest. Locals can enjoy culinary demonstrations, chef competitions and wine, beer and spirit tastings right on the park's event lawn across from Music Hall.

Not only will you be able to sample incredible food and drink, but CF+WC is partnering with Findlay Market and Freestore FoodBank to provide more than 14,000 meals to locals in need.

Cincinnati was recently called out as the next big food city in the U.S. by Keith Pandolfi, a Cincinnati native and freelance writer for Saveur magazine. Pandolfi — who served as a judge last year for CF+WC's Pork Chopped competition — shined a light on the restaurant scene in Cincinnati and the Midwest with good reason.

“This is the kind of thing we want to stand for,” says Courtney Tsitouris, CF+WC co-founder. “Never again and never before have you seen this particular collection of talent together. We've pulled people from the Midwest and all over the country.”

Do Good:

Register for tickets to the Cincinnati Food + Wine Classic Sept. 11-13 at Washington Park. Ticket packages are available for each day as well as for the full weekend.

• Lend a hand and volunteer your time for the weekend.

• Check out the full list of this year’s participating culinary talent.
 

Party like a rock star at Music Resource Center fundraiser


The Music Resource Center (MRC) in Walnut Hills is hosting its annual Party Like a Rockstar fundraiser Aug. 29 to raise funds to support the after-school program, which hosts kids learning to play guitar, singing opera, rapping and playing jazz under one roof.

The benefit will feature a performance from MRC students, a silent auction and an open bar featuring craft beer, draft beer, liquor and wine, says Executive Director Karen D'Agostino.

The MRC provides recording and performing equipment to local teens between the grades of 7 and 12 for $2 a month. Kids can take private lessons, train in rehearsal rooms and record music in the multi-track recording studio.

MRC recently launched a low-frequency radio station, 95.7-FM, that features original content recorded at the studio, ranging from music to talk shows and public service announcements.

But the organization is more than just about recording music and performing arts. Mentors use life skills to create a sense of empowerment for the kids who spend their afternoons at the MRC.

“Some of them have very low confidence and struggle at school,” D’Agostino says. “But that kid who can’t concentrate comes in and sits in a studio for three hours straight. He’s found a passion he hasn’t had the opportunity to explore elsewhere.”

Do Good:

• Register to attend the Party Like a Rockstar benefit event on Saturday, Aug. 29 at The Redmoor in Mt. Lookout. Tickets are $65 for one person and $120 for two.

• The Music Resource Center depends on volunteer teachers, so please donate your time for a good cause.

• For more information about MRC’s radio station, 95.7, visit their website. 
 

Local glassworkers join forces to celebrate National Bead Challenge Day


Beads of Courage has worked for the past 10 years to provide a unique and innovative approach to help children who are dealing with serious illnesses find ways to cope.
 
To back the organization in its mission of providing arts-in-medicine programming, Tristate artists will gather at Brazee Street Studios Sept. 19 for National Bead Challenge Day. The event — hosted at 20 art studios across the country — is intended to encourage artists to produce one-of-a-kind designs that children who are coping with cancer and blood disorders, cardiac conditions, burn injuries and chronic illness, in addition to families with children in neonatal intensive care, can add to their collections.
 
“We’re proud to host this event each year and to know that the beads created make a difference to children undergoing difficult medical treatments and bring a smile to their faces,” says Chelsea Borgman, Brazee’s gallery coordinator.
 
The Beads of Courage program begins when a child receives a string in addition to alphabet beads to spell out his or her first name and continues as health care providers give him or her colorful new beads to mark treatment milestones.
 
Beads crafted at National Bead Challenge Day serve as particularly special additions to children’s beaded creations, as they’re reminders of their courage and perseverance throughout the coping process.
 
“These beads mean the world to children who receive them,” Borgman says. “It’s a way for these kids to show their strength and say to the world and themselves, ‘I did it!’”

Do Good: 

• Support Beads of Courage by donating.

• Attend National Bead Challenge Day at Brazee Street Studios in Oakley 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 19. There will be activities for children in addition to opportunities to write letters to children in the Beads of Courage program. 

• Connect with Beads of Courage on Facebook.
 

Arts Center ready to "Raise the Heights" with grand opening of new space


Currently the Kennedy Heights Arts Center serves about 5,000 people a year, but according to Ellen Muse-Lindeman, the nonprofit’s executive director, that number is expected to double with the grand opening of its Lindner Annex.
 
The new space, which allows the Center to quadruple in size, is already home to local artists — including the Ohio Valley Woodturners Guild — who are using studio space to develop their craft. It will soon play host to a variety of performing arts, public and private events and classes ranging in subject matter — everything from photography to graphic design in its new state-of-the-art Scripps Howard Media Center.
 
“We find that digital art forms are really popular,” Muse-Lindeman says, “Kids and young adults have lots of interests, so we want to help harness that activity and provide ways for young people to learn how to develop their own content and develop their own voices through that content.”
 
The Center, as it’s done for years, will continue its inclusion policy, so classes will be accessible to all.
 
“We don’t turn anyone away for inability to pay,” Muse-Lindeman says. “We have a sliding scale for tuition, so people pay what they’re able to afford. We have a real core concentration of participants from the area.”
 
And the hope is for that core to continue to expand, bringing more children, teens and adults — novices and already-established artists — into a space that fosters creativity and collaboration, while enhancing the region as a whole.
 
“There are so many benefits to bringing more artists to urban communities,” Muse-Lindeman says. “It brings more vitality and excitement, and when artists invest their time and their talents in this neighborhood, it attracts more types of activity and leads to positive revitalization.” 

Do Good: 

• Help celebrate the grand opening of the new space by attending Raise the Heights, an art parade and festival 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 29. The official ribbon cutting is planned for 10 a.m. Aug. 28. 

•  The Lindner Annex, in addition to the Kennedy Heights Montessori Center, make up what will now be known as the  Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus, but they're looking for a third partner to move in and complete the campus. The partner can be either a nonprofit or for-profit venture but should align with the education/arts theme. Contact Ellen Muse-Lindeman if you’re interested. 

• Connect with the Kennedy Heights Arts Center on Facebook, and stay tuned for information on events, space rental and fall programming, which begins enrollment in September.
 

Stepping Stones' end-of-summer "Bloom" garden party to raise programming funds


Stepping Stones provides educational and recreational programs for more than 1,000 local children and adults with developmental disabilities each year. Bloom, an annual event to raise money to support its mission and programs, returns for its 11th year Sept. 12 and is bringing in sponsors from all across the Greater Cincinnati area. 

The outdoor garden party will feature live music, food from 20 different local restaurants and caterers and a silent auction. Partygoers will be able to bid on a vacation to England to see a Manchester United soccer match, four nights in a Parisian apartment, signed sports memorabilia and other prizes.
 
Through the help of Bloom co-chairs and owner of Towne Properties Neil and Susie Bortz, a financial assistance program has been established to help make Stepping Stones' programs more accessible for low-income children, teens and adults with disabilities: No Person Left Behind.
 
“Our hope is this fund continues and is the wind beneath the wings of these people who need a little help to attend our programs,” says Peggy Kreimer, communication and grants director.

The Bloom committee has designated 15 percent of each sponsorship to go to No Person Left Behind.

Do Good:

Register to attend the Sept. 12 garden party, presented by PNC Bank, on Saturday, Sept. 12 at Greenacres Arts Center in Indian Hill. Tickets are $150.

• Can't make it to the party? Donate to No Person Left Behind.

Be a buddy to a child with a disability. Stepping Stones has an ongoing need for volunteers 13 years and older.
 

Bluegrass for Babies benefit concert returns to Sawyer Point


Enjoy live bluegrass music and favorite local foods Sept. 19 at Bluegrass for Babies, an annual concert that benefits Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The family-friendly event is presented by the Healthy Roots Foundation as a fundraiser for infant and child health in the community.

Nearly $130,000 has been raised since the first Bluegrass for Babies concert in 2009, says Anne Schneider, founder of Healthy Roots.

“This year we're going to support new research through the Center for Prevention of Preterm Birth,” Schneider says. “We really want to take a new look at environment impact on prenatal care and what that looks like, what the influences are.”

Healthy Roots was established in 2009 by Anne and her husband when their youngest son, Nicholas, was born with a life-threatening birth defect. The organization aims to provide tools and resources to parents and help educate them on how to raise healthy children.

The family-friendly bluegrass concert will feature craft beer; food by Green BEAN Delivery, Eli’s Barbeque, Mazunte and Dewey’s Pizza; and live bluegrass music by Cabinet, Comet Bluegrass All-Stars, Hickory Robot and Jennifer Ellis Music. There will also be interactive games and activities for children.

Adults tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the gate. Children 12 and younger are admitted for free.
 
Do Good:

Purchase tickets online to Babies for Bluegrass 3-9 p.m. Sept. 19 at Sawyer Point downtown.

Donate to Healthy Roots Foundation.

• Healthy Roots is 100 percent volunteer based, so donate your time as a volunteer
 

Comedy benefit honors women living with breast cancer


Most breast cancer foundations focus on raising money for research or to help cover medical bills, but one is dedicated to putting fun back into the lives of women living with the disease.
 
The Karen Wellington Foundation for Women wants women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, along with their families, to enjoy their lives by taking a break from the exhausting day-to-day struggles of doctor’s appointments, scans and chemotherapy and radiation treatments. The foundation provides these women with miniature vacations, spa visits, dinners and concert tickets.

Sticking with the theme of “Fun Now!” the foundation is hosting a comedy showcase Aug. 11 to raise money to send more women on vacations and allow them to live in the moment.
 
Six top local comedians will take the stage to address the sensitive issue doing what they do best: Andy Gasper, Faith Mueller, Laura Sanders, Mark Chalifoux, Gabe Kea and Chris Weir.
 
“Comedy and humor are such a huge part of the healing process,” says Michael Holder, host, board member and local comedian. “There is tension we can destroy with comedy. Think of it is a way of laughing in the face of cancer.”
 
The foundation was founded eight years ago in honor of Wellington, a young mother who was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 30 and passed away 10 years later. 
 
The benefit will take place 8-11 p.m. Aug. 11 at Go Bananas Comedy Club in Montgomery. All ticket proceeds go to the foundation and its mission.

Do Good:

• Plan to buy tickets and attend Fun Now!; admission is $15.

• Learn more about the Karen Wellington Foundation for Women at its website.

Lend your vacation home, condo or timeshare to the foundation to provide a fun break for a woman with breast cancer and her family.
 

Funke pottery studio encourages individual empowerment


Whether you’re looking to hone your ceramic skills or just starting out, Funke Fired Arts is a place where anyone can be an artist.
 
Funke’s instructors teach every level of a smorgasbord of classes: wheel throwing, handbuilding and sculpture. 
 
“People always say, ‘I don’t have a creative bone in my body,’” says Ben Clark, director of instruction. “But if you get them to take just one class, it opens a part of them they didn’t know they had. Creating something new makes people feel great. You realize how many talents you have beyond your day-to-day job.”
 
Funke is one of the largest clay studios in the country. The facility has multiple kilns and more than 50 spinning wheels. There are other studios, a gallery and a children’s education center as well.

But what makes Funke unique is its full-retail service shop, which sells clay, glaze, raw materials, tools, wheels, kilns, bricks, etc. They have formed several relationships with art teachers in the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky areas in order to expand their reach. The money that comes in from art product purchases can be used to invest in education for local communities, Clark says. 

The studio is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m-5 p.m. Friday and noon-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

Do Good:

• Get your hands dirty and register for a class at Funke Fired Arts, 3130 Wasson Road, Hyde Park.

• Become friends with Funke on Facebook.

• Support Funke by buying local art products.
 

Students build social skills at unique music/art camp


This summer you might find kids sitting in a drum circle working together to create music. The next hour, you might see them standing around a table creating a sculpture together and presenting it to their class.
 
These kids all have one thing in common: a social skills camp collaboration between Melodic Connections and Visionaries + Voices.
 
The camp is designed to give kids with different types of special learning needs a place where they can practice their social skills in a structured environment. The camps prevents a “summer slide” that often happens between academic school years, when a child's mind sits idle during the summer months and loses valuable reading and social skills. 
 
“This summer was loaded with all of these awesome creative mediums for kids to be their silly selves together and thrive but really have some structured practice at the same time,” says Betsey Nuseibeh, executive director of Melodic Connections. “They learn how to work together and work on making friends but also finding out what that means and looks like.”

In the past, kids had the opportunity to work on their social skills through music and art. This year, yoga and dance were added to the agenda. Ensemble Theatre also had a hand in this summer's round of one-week camp sessions. 
 
The summer social skills camp is a place for kids to not only show off their abilities but to also take that camp experience and use it to create more positive experiences in their lives, Nuseibeh says. 
 
Do Good:

• Melodic Connections is always looking for volunteers.

• Be a Facebook friend of Melodic Connections and Visionaries + Voices.

Donate to help Visionaries + Voices' mission.
 

Macy's Kids, Cultures, Critters and Crafts Festival returns, celebrates 10 years


Thousands of people gather at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden each summer to enjoy the Macy’s Kids, Cultures, Critters and Crafts Festival.
 
The July 22 event will mark 10 years since Learning Through Art started bringing neighbors from all across the region together. LTA is a local organization committed to encouraging multicultural awareness understanding and commits to increasing community participation in the arts and in communities.  
 
“We want to let the world know that it's not just about visiting the zoo,” says Kathy Wade, LTA co-founder and CEO. “It's also about seeing and meeting your neighbors right in the middle of our city.”
 
In an effort to support early childhood literacy, LTA is asking patrons to join the Read to Me! Movement. Visitors can buy a book or make a $10 donation to help build a future for a child.
 
Entertainment is slated throughout the day July 22, ranging from music and cultural dance to puppeteers and hands-on opportunities for kids. The festival is introducing an international craft corner this year where kids will be able to make native crafts from six different countries, ranging from Mexico and Egypt to Russia and France.
 
Admission to the event is $1. You can ride Metro's Route 46 bus to the zoo for 50 cents for a one-way trip or $1 round trip. 
 
Do Good:

• Attend the Macy’s Kids, Cultures, Critters and Crafts Festival at the Cincinnati Zoo 9 a.m.-6 p.m. July 22.

• Donate to the Read to Me! Campaign on GoFundMe.

Support Learning Through Art.
 

The Carnegie announces six diverse shows for its 2015-16 gallery season


The Carnegie recently announced the exhibition lineup for its 2015-16 gallery season, which runs from September until late June. Shows range from an examination of the history and communities of Covington to experimental cinema to the use of abstract art. 

How does Exhibition Director Matt Distel and his team determine which exhibitions make the final cut?

“That’s the social component of what The Carnegie is trying to do — organize shows that people will respond to, that challenge people and their conceptions,” he says. “The challenge of putting on shows is to make the unfamiliar familiar and sometimes take something you know and turning it on its head, making the familiar unfamiliar."

Each exhibition's opening night, except for the Art of Food events, includes a free informal conversation with Distel and participating artists, light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar.

After opening night, each exhibition can be viewed 12-5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays.

Here is the 2015-16 gallery season:

Sept. 11-Nov. 21
I am, I be, but we don’t: site-specific works by Terence Hammonds, Anissa Lewis and Tim McMichael
New works examine Covington’s history and communities.
 
Extra Credit: Documenting Higher Level Art 2008-2015
Documentation of the 50-plus murals created for Covington Independent Public Schools plus new installations and other projects by Northern Kentucky's Higher Level Art organization.
 
Dec. 4-Feb. 6
Modern Living: Objects and Context
Co-curated with BLDG, a two-part exhibition explores the intersection and conflation of design and art objects with artists and designers Keith Benjamin, Such + Such, Brush Factory, Matt Lynch, Matthew Metzger, Chris Vorhees, Taryn Cassella, Colin Klimesh, CVG Made, Grainwell and Ampersand.
 
Feb. 24 & 26
10th Annual Art of Food
The popular event returns bigger and better than ever.
 
March 11-April 23
The Mini (Microcinema)
The Carnegie is transformed into an experimental movie theater with rotating galleries and screenings programmed by C. Jacqueline Wood.
 
May 6-June 11
Formal Function: Strategies of Abstraction
Regional survey examining the use of abstraction in painting, sculpture and other media with artists Jeffrey Cortland Jones, Justin Hodges, Rick Wolhoy, Jolie Harris, Joe Winterhalter, Mark Dejong, Scott Bellissemo, Jimmy Baker, Paige Williams, Frank Herrmann, Kim Krause and more.

Do Good:

Visit The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington.

• Keep track of what's next during the 2015-16 gallery season.

Donate to help maintain The Carnegie's mission. 
 

Watch the Cincinnati Art Museum restore outdoor bronze statue


The Cincinnati Art Museum's conservation department is in the process of restoring and re-installing The Vine, a bronze statue that used to live in its Alice Bimel Courtyard. The sculpture was kept outside for decades and was damaged by wind, rain and other elements.

Restoration is open to the public in the courtyard. Museum visitors can watch Assistant Objects Conservator Kelly Schulze revive the statue using a multi-step process that will remove any previous treatment and corrosion products. She will apply a new protective layer to protect the statue from future erosion. 

"Our conservation departments are experts in restoring paintings and structures," says Jill Dunne, marketing and communications director. "Schulze is restoring this famous, beautiful structure to its former glory." 

The Vine is one of six sculptures that stand at an 86-inch scale. Harriet Whitney Frishmuth, its Philadelphia-born sculptor, is famous for creating bronze work based on dancers who posed for her. The museum has other works of her's in the courtyard as well — one statuette and four large scale bronzes.

Restoration is expected to last through July but might go into August, depending on the weather. Visitors can view the restoration in the Alice Bimel Courtyard Tuesday through Thursday 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-4 p.m.

Do Good:

Visit the Cincinnati Art Museum to see the restoration progress.

• Become a Cincinnati Art Museum friend on Facebook.

• Support the museum by adopting a piece of art
 

Metro offers free Fan Shuttle in downtown, OTR to connect All Star Game weekend activities


If you’re worried about downtown traffic and parking during All Star Game weekend, look no further than Metro, which is offering free shuttle service for related festivities.
 
The Metro Fan Shuttle will run 7-10 p.m. Friday, July 10; 12-10 p.m. Saturday, July 11; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday, July 12; and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. as well as 6-9 p.m. Monday, July 13. Buses will run a loop from Fountain Square to Government Square to Duke Energy Convention Center to Washington Park every 10-12 minutes.
 
“Metro is running the free Fan Shuttle as a courtesy to the community to help ease traffic congestion and allow easier access for visitors and residents to enjoy the dozens of events and activities scheduled during All Star weekend in downtown and Over-the-Rhine,” says Brandy Jones, Metro’s public relations manager.
 
According to Jones, an estimated 200,000 visitors are expected in town during the weekend, so there’s no better time to leave your car behind. Metro offers 21 different Park & Ride locations to bring you downtown, in addition to 50 routes throughout the region.
 
“It's a great way to introduce new riders to our service and remind the community just how easy and convenient it is to take Metro every day,” Jones says. “And once they're in town, the free Metro Fan Shuttle allows riders to hop on and off along the route connecting them to dozens of events at the Duke Energy Center, Fountain Square and Washington Park.” 

The Duke Energy Center is hosting the T-Mobile All Star FanFest Friday-Tuesday, and there are free events every day at Fountain Square and Washington Park. Soapbox has the full schedule of All Star Game events and festivities here.

Do Good: 

• Hop aboard Metro's Fan Shuttle. Hours of operation and details regarding pick-up and drop-off sites can be found here.

• Take part in All Star Game festivities, and attend free events around town.

• New rider? Learn everything you need to know about riding Metro here.
 

Faces Without Places raffling off two All Star Game tix to support its kids programs


If you haven’t yet snagged a ticket strip for the 2015 All Star Game festivities, your odds of finding one for less than $500 at this point are few and far between.
 
Faces Without Places, a nonprofit whose mission is “to empower lives by removing educational barriers and provide enrichment opportunities for children and youth experiencing homelessness,” is giving you a chance at tickets for just $20. 
 
Thanks to a donation from John Burns, local businessman and former president of Cincinnati Bell Technology Solutions, Faces Without Places is raffling off a pair of Diamond Seats — just behind home plate — for the July 10-14 events.
 
The tickets are valued at $2,500 apiece and include food along with access to all All Star Game activities, including the game itself, the SiriusXM All Star Futures Game, the All Star Legends & Celebrity Softball Game and the Gatorade All Star Workout Day, which features the Gillette Home Run Derby presented by Head & Shoulders.
 
“This donation will enable Faces Without Places to continue on our trajectory of expansion,” says Mike Moroski, the nonprofit’s executive director. “We have some new things in store that will enable us to broaden our impact by keeping children experiencing homelessness connected to their education.”
 
Some of the ways the organization has done that thus far are through its annual Yellow Bus Summer Camp (YBSC) and ZooMates, a year-long mentoring program that pairs children from St. Francis de Sales School with students from Xavier University.
 
According to Moroski, 95 percent of children at last summer's YBSC increased or retained their math and/or reading skills, and a large majority of the children involved with ZooMates (87%) planned on attending college after participating in the program.
 
“We have raised a little over $16,000 thus far, and our goal is to reach $20,000 by July 10,” Moroski says. “Mr. Burns' donation of these tickets will help us to expand and grow more comfortably, and we could not be more grateful for his generosity.”

Do Good: 

• Support Faces Without Places by purchasing raffle tickets for a chance to win a pair of tickets to the 2015 All Star Game and related festivities. Entries will be accepted through July 10 at 5:15 p.m., with the drawing to follow at 5:30. Winners will be contacted immediately.

• Attend a free event at the Contemporary Arts Center July 30 at 6 p.m. to introduce Faces Without Places' rebranding campaign and announce what's in store for the future.

Get involved with Faces Without Places by donating, volunteering or attending/hosting an event.
 

Students work creatively with glass, learn and grow through art


If you missed the opening for Brazee Street Studios’ fifth annual Kids Exhibition, 513 Penguins, you’ll have a second chance to view students’ work at a reception taking place July 10 at C-LINK Gallery.
 
Students from 13 local schools worked to create more than 500 glass penguins — an activity made possible by the staff at Brazee along with 13 teachers who learned the project and then taught it remotely at their respective schools. Bullseye Glass Co. donated all of the glass.
 
According to Chelsea Borgman, C-LINK gallery coordinator and communications specialist, one of Brazee’s core missions is to help children not only express themselves through art but also appreciate the art-making experience.
 
“The annual children's exhibition is not only about the end result — it’s just as much, if not more, about the process,” Borgman says. “Children get to experiment with a material they may not otherwise have an opportunity to use, see how the glass transforms through the firing process, then have their work on display, realizing their connectedness to the smaller community of the classroom and the larger community of Cincinnati.”
 
The process also teaches students trust, Borgman says, as glass is oftentimes viewed as dangerous.
 
“When we trust the children to handle the glass safely, it helps them to trust themselves and take ownership over the responsibility to use this ‘dangerous’ material,” she says.
 
Perhaps most importantly, the program provides an opportunity for children to express their uniqueness without fear of judgment, as no two penguins are crafted the same.
 
“Each one has its own personality, which is a reflection of the choices made by the child during the creation process,” Borgman says. “We hope we have provided an opportunity for children to express themselves without the worry of finding the ‘wrong’ answer. There is no ‘wrong’ way to make their penguin, which I think can be quite liberating.”
 
Do Good: 

• Attend the second reception for 513 Penguins at 6-9 p.m. July 10 at Brazee's C-LINK Gallery in Oakley. Live penguins from Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden will be on site. Guests will also have the opportunity to create a penguin of their own.

• If you can't make the reception, show your appreciation for students' creations by viewing the exhibition, which is on display through Aug. 6. Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays; 12-8 p.m. Thursdays; and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. 

• Check out Brazee's class offerings for students of all ages and abilities. 
 
261 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
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