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UC Economics Center honors those who promote financial literacy


UC’s Economics Center hosted its eighth annual awards luncheon two weeks ago to honor students, educators and sponsors making a difference in society’s understanding and implementation of financial literacy. More than 700 business leaders and educators joined together for the event, in which General Electric’s Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt addressed economic empowerment and “The Next Industrial Era.”
 
“I learned there are four things that competitive societies focus on: education, small business, the infrastructure and more competitiveness from government,” Immelt said. “We see those things in the state of Ohio.”
 
Because of support from local businesses and individuals who value the mission of the Economics Center, it’s able to offer programming and resources to schools and teachers who can empower students with the knowledge needed to be successful in a changing economy.
 
The Center, for example, works with schools to implement the Student Enterprise Program (StEP), in which students earn currency — for things like turning in homework or arriving to school on time — which they can later spend at the StEP store. It fosters critical thinking and an awareness of entrepreneurship, spending and saving. (See the StEP video shown at the awards event here.)
 
Immelt, who grew up in Cincinnati, is a model for success and what one can attain when knowledgeable about economics, and said he’s determined to make sure our youth “have the hunger, the discipline and the skills to continue to go out and face the world with confidence.”
 
“We need great people to help them do that,” Immelt said at the March 16 event. “That’s our job — to teach the next generation how to compete, how to make a difference in the world, the value of economic strength and how to be focused on innovation and humility, accountability and purpose. When we do well we win together, and that’s what’s happening here.”

Do Good:

• Make a difference by giving to the Economics Center at the University of Cincinnati.

• Make a difference by volunteering.

• If you're interested in becoming a corporate sponsor, contact the Center.
 

Male joins lots of women leading girls to develop confidence through running


Steve Brandstetter was never much of a runner, but he discovered his passion for it about 15 years ago with a bit of help from his brother-in-law, a marathon runner who assisted Steve in preparing for his first-ever distance run.
 
So when traveling to Michigan, where his brother-in-law lives, it came as no surprise to Brandstetter that running would occupy at least a portion of the visit.
 
“That, coupled with a closeness to my nieces who shared a love of soccer and now this running thing which I had become enamored with, made for some great visits between our families,” Brandstetter says. “My daughters, about 13 and 17 at the time, had shared these loves to different degrees as well.”

At one point during the trip, Brandstetter says his niece mentioned Girls on the Run, an organization whose mission is to “inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum which creatively integrates running.”
 
Brandstetter was sold. As someone who had coached soccer for years and who had recently found his own love for running, it was something he wanted his girls — his daughters as well as the girls on his team — to experience.
 
Upon returning home he looked around for information regarding the nonprofit but got busy with life, deciding Girls on the Run was simply something he wouldn't realistically be able to pursue at that point in his life.
 
“Then, some months later, as I'm devouring Bob Roncker’s Running Spot quarterly publication of ‘All Things Running,’ I happened upon this blurb on the back cover of the paper that, much to my disbelief, was calling for volunteers for this program, strangely enough called Girls on the Run,” Brandstetter says. “I had found it.”
 
Brandstetter has now been involved with the organization as a volunteer for 10 years. He can’t serve as a head coach, as that role is reserved for females who serve as role models for the girls, but says he’s valued every moment of time spent with the organization serving in various capacities — everything from assistant coaching to planning the two yearly 5k runs (the Spring run is May 9).
 
“Nearly every single young girl in that program just gravitated toward me, the only male in the coaching program at the time,” Brandstetter says. “They seemed so hungry for the love and attention that only a father can give. I got notes, pictures and thank yous from many of the families, and I did nothing more than be a guy who was there and present to deserve that.
 
“But the real impact comes from the consistent implementation and delivery of the message, values and beliefs of Girls on the Run delivered by caring and engaging women who understand the value of the program, who passionately bring that experience to each girl.”

Do Good:

• Join the team of Girls on the Run volunteers.

Register your girl for the program. The Spring 5k is scheduled for May 9.

• Help make the program possible for all girls by donating
 

NKU professor to publish findings on long-term impacts of service learning


When Julie Olberding first began her career at Northern Kentucky University, she knew she would need to find a nonprofit to partner with for her Resource Acquisition and Management course. After browsing the newspaper, she came upon The Inner City Tennis Project, whose aim is to provide low-cost and high-quality tennis instruction to inner-city students.
 
“I felt compelled to work with them,” says Olberding, who currently serves as director of NKU’s Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Management graduate certificate programs.

“It was run by two people who had worked for the Cincinnati Recreation Commission who weren’t millionaires, who weren’t loaded with resources,” she says, “but the story went on to talk about how each of them contributed something like $10,000 of their own money to pay for renting courts and vans for their teams to participate in matches. They were basically pooling money from their pockets, from their retirement, to pay for it.”
 
Both her Resource Acquisition and Management course and her Volunteer Management course engaged in service learning projects with the Inner City Tennis Project, and in the 10 years since, Olberding’s classes have continued to engage in projects that have long-lasting impacts.
 
“I had a student who went on to do an internship for them and then became a board member and ultimately their president,” Olberding says, “and he invited me to one of their special events called the Sneaker Ball, which is a gala where everybody dresses up and they wear tennis shoes, and there’s a silent auction. ... It was an idea that was created, or further developed, by the original Resource Management class.”
 
Unsure of what to expect, Olberding attended the event and was “blown away,” she says, at its success.
 
“It opened my eyes and my imagination — or interest — in terms of wondering what happened to other organizations, but I hadn’t had or taken the time to follow up with them to see what these long term impacts were,” she says.
 
So she worked with a graduate student to follow up with community partners and conduct surveys years after projects took place.
 
“In looking at the literature on service learning and even student philanthropy, which is part of that, there didn’t seem to be a lot on how these projects can have longer term impacts,” Olberding says. “We kind of assume they are, because in our classes in particular we focus on things like nonprofit strategic planning, program evaluation, fundraising, volunteer management — all things that have that potential.”
 
So Olberding and a former student compiled data to co-author a piece that speaks to the long-term impacts of service learning, which will be published in the Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership later this year.
 
“I think sometimes when people think about service learning,” Olberding says, “they think of the undergraduate class maybe going to a food pantry or homeless shelter — providing hours of service in a way that’s very helpful but is somewhat contained to that moment of providing direct services — versus a graduate-level class like the ones we have where students are professionals themselves, bringing different content that really is designed to have longer term impacts.
 
“The most common comment or theme that the nonprofits I’ve been involved with have said are, ‘I haven’t thought about that’ or ‘I haven’t had time to think about it,’ and once they have information and a plan in front of them hopefully they can find a group of volunteers or a committee or board members to take the lead on helping them implement the ideas students brought to the table.” 

Do Good:

Contact NKU's Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement with a service learning idea.

Learn more about NKU's Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Management certificate programs.

• Follow the Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement on Facebook.
 

Deadline for Public Library Comic Con drawing contest entries is March 31


The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s Comic Con 2015 Drawing Contest is underway with one week remaining for children ages 5 and above, teens and adults to submit their artwork.
 
“It’s unique in that it gives people the opportunity to show their work and be recognized for their talents by everyone who attends Cincinnati Library Comic Con,” says LeeAnn McNabb, reference librarian in the downtown branch's popular department. 
 
Awards will be presented at the Comic Con's Main Event on Saturday, May 16, which will feature creator and partner booths, gaming areas, free comics and more.
 
In its third year, the Cincinnati Library Comic Con provides fans, creators and aspiring creators with a venue and an opportunity to come together “in a fun, friendly, cooperative environment where they can access the tools and information they need to entertain or educate themselves about the world of comics,” says McNabb, who initiated the idea.
 
For McNabb, it’s important that comic books, graphic novels and manga are incorporated into our understanding of literacy because they’re generally familiar, fun and not intimidating,, serving as a “gateway to reading.”
 
“People read and absorb information in different ways, and it’s important for us to acknowledge that,” McNabb says. “Some readers connect better with contextual imagery that accompanies text rather than narratives told solely through the written word. For example, some students who are struggling readers, no matter what age they are, can use the sequential art as a sort of road map that can provide clues to understanding words they are not familiar with.”

Do Good: 

• Download your drawing contest entry form here. Entry deadline is March 31.

• Check out the Cincinnati Library Comic Con Main Event schedule here.

• Connect with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County on Facebook.
 

The Women's Fund hosts Lisa Ling appearance to fund 2015 grants


It’s not too late to purchase tickets to The Women’s Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation’s “A Conversation with Lisa Ling” Wednesday, March 25 at Memorial Hall.
 
The evening commences at 5:30 p.m. with drinks and appetizers, followed by Ling’s speech. Tickets are $40, and proceeds enable the organization to add to the $1 million it’s granted since 2004 to nonprofits supporting female self sufficiency and empowerment.

Ling is executive producer and host of This Is Life on CNN and previously hosted Our America on the Oprah Winfrey Network and co-hosted ABC's hit show The View. She is also an author and co-founder of the website SecretSocietyofWomen.com.
 
“Lisa often tells the stories of people whose lives are often misunderstood or overlooked and finds not only the beauty but also the hope that lies within them,” says Vanessa Freytag, executive director of The Women’s Fund. “What a beautiful lens for our community to adopt as we learn about women and their families who are struggling right here at home.”
 
In addition to awarding grants to nonprofits and offering events that spark community dialogue, The Women’s Fund also commissions research.
 
In its most recent Pulse report, “2020 Jobs and Gender Outlook,” findings indicate that by 2020 four out of every seven jobs held by females will not provide enough income for her to cover the basic needs of herself and one child.
 
“When you take that in context with the fact that two-thirds of children in poverty are in female-headed households, you start to see why it is important for the entire community to work on strategies that can help hard working moms reach self-sufficiency,” Freytag says. “There is no more important challenge to creating a thriving region than addressing this issue.”

Do Good: 

Buy tickets for "A Conversation with Lisa Ling."

• Support The Women's Fund by giving.

• Learn about The Women's Fund 2015 grant cycle and consider applying for a mini-grant or signing up as a volunteer to review them. 
 

Cincinnati native launches Queen City Crowdfunding to tap into the region's generosity


For Jim Cunningham, primary founder, funder and general manager of Queen City Crowdfunding, improving the Greater Cincinnati region is a primary aim.
 
“My family and my wife’s (family) have lived here almost since the Civil War, and both of our children have stayed here, so we are totally committed to this region,” Cunningham says. “Fortunately it’s one of the best and most affordable places in the world to live. The people here are generous, as shown by the large United Way and other charitable and arts-related support.”
 
Because of that generosity, it’s important to raise awareness about crowdfunding as an asset for both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors, Cunningham says.
 
Cunningham managed operations at Queen City Angels, the startup investor group, and following his recent retirement he launched QCC, a free service that allows entrepreneurs to create or publicize their already-live campaigns.
 
Many people are familiar with global platforms like Kickstarter, for example, but QCC will highlight all local ventures, attracting contributors who are perhaps outside the circles of those launching campaigns.
 
“A lot of the campaigns we support are for-profit businesses that create jobs and enrich the local business community and consumers’ choices,” Cunningham says. “But The Gallery Project is a nonprofit that I found especially appealing because it is in an urban area, on Woodburn Avenue (in Walnut Hills), that will benefit from this arts incubator for its youth. It can enrich the lives of people through exposure to the arts and hands-on mentoring in a field that is not the focus of schools.”
 
The Gallery Project raised $2,865 during its two-month long campaign, and though it didn’t reach its goal of $10,000 Cunningham says a few thousand dollars can certainly help it move forward.
 
“It’s a worthy social venture in a part of town that would not normally attract a lot of funding, but it could advertise itself to the broad Cincinnati community,” Cunningham says. “Increasing the entire region’s awareness of crowdfunding is a long-term project, and we’re in this for the long haul.” 

Do Good:

• Explore local campaigns at Queen City Crowdfunding and consider contributing.

• Join QCC and publicize your own crowdfunding campaign. It's completely free.

• Learn more about how QCC works and help the site launch by sharing it with your friends.
 

Help OTR Brewery District put Cincy on map with heritage trail


Nonprofits, small business owners and residents all came together two weekends ago in Over-the-Rhine to make Bockfest successful in its 23rd year, but there's more to look forward to given what Cincinnati’s Brewery District has in store.
 
“Bockfest is a celebration of beer, the coming of spring, but also a celebration of the neighborhood and a particular place,” says Steven Hampton, executive director of the Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation. “This neighborhood is the key.”
 
And it’s that notion of “neighborhood” and a sense of place that's driving the nonprofit’s mission to make the Brewery District “the place to live, work and play.” Through festivals like Bockfest, the OTR Biergarten, historic brewery tours and most recently its work to create the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail, the Brewery District is making strides in putting historic OTR on the map.
 
“We get a lot of folks that say, ‘I’m not a museum folk or wouldn’t normally come down here, but beer history, I’m all aboard,’” Hampton says. “We joke we can tell anybody’s story in history and intertwine it with beer. There are so many facts about how much we drank and produced, but how it was intertwined with stories of how this city grew, that’s the fun thing.”
 
To share those stories and to create interactive ways for neighbors and visitors to grow the city further, the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail — a project Hampton says will come completely to fruition in the next four years or so — will showcase Cincinnati’s unique history while revitalizing the northern Over-the-Rhine district and generating tourism.
 
“It really has the potential to be a world class neighborhood,” Hampton says. “Boston is known worldwide for the Freedom Trail, Kentucky for the Bourbon Trail. Cincinnati’s going to be known for this.

“Most cities would kill to have this amazing collection of history and architecture, all these different cultural assets in one amazing, walkable neighborhood. So we’re going to capitalize on and focus on what we have — these amazing assets left to us — and continue to build those and share them with folks locally and the world to make this a better place.”

Do Good 

Learn about the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail.

• Take a tour and experience Cincinnati's brewing history for yourself. 

• Help build the trail by donating
 

Pedaling 4 Paddy to generate support, awareness for Wasson Way


Pedaling 4 Paddy has become an annual tradition since it kicked off in 2011 when bike enthusiast Maggie Brennan told a group of friends they should initiate a community ride in March to celebrate community, cycling and one of her favorite holidays,  St. Patrick’s Day.
 
“I wanted to keep it grassroots,” Brennan says. “Ride your bike and have drinks and food after.”

The 2015 event happens Saturday, March 21, starting at Fifty West Brewing Company and offers trail options for cyclists and non-cyclists alike — hop-on and hop-off options for the leisurely in addition to a 52-mile trek to Morrow and back for the more avid riders.
 
The event is free, though participants are encouraged to donate $20 to benefit Wasson Way, a project Brennan learned about just prior to the inaugural Pedaling 4 Paddy.
 
“I had just learned of their volunteer efforts to build a bike trail connecting several neighborhoods in the city,” Brennan says “It’s a 7.6-mile trail starting at Victory Parkway near Walnut Hills High School and eventually connecting to the Little Miami Bike Trail in Mariemont and is going to be a huge asset for the community — especially students from Xavier, UC, Withrow and Walnut Hills.”
 
A dedicated team of volunteers, like Brennan, hope to take their vision for Wasson Way and make it a reality, but they need support to make it happen.
 
“We're looking forward to the day when we can have Pedaling 4 Paddy on the Wasson Way,” Brennan says. “It’s a fun event, bringing together cyclists and non-cyclists to raise money for it.”  

Do Good:

• Learn about how you can get involved with Wasson Way.

• Support Wasson Way by donating.

• Join the fun by participating in Pedaling 4 Paddy on Saturday, March 21.

• Read about Wasson Way as one of Soapbox's top 10 transportation stories to follow in 2015.
 

Talbert House celebrates 50 years, honors top employees


The Talbert House has worked to “improve social behavior and enhance personal recovery and growth” for its clients since 1965. Now, in its 50th anniversary year, the organization is looking ahead to see how it can continue delivering quality care and support to the tens of thousands of adults and children it reaches in a given year.
 
One thing is certain: Quality employees lead to quality services. And to celebrate 50 years in the community, the nonprofit recently honored the key players who work day-in and day-out to uphold standards of excellence.
 
Michael Allen, resident of Westwood and clinical supervisor for the Talbert House, was honored as Employee of the Year.
 
“I am privileged to work for Talbert House, where I can do what I love every day,” Allen says. “I am passionate about my work because I want to be a part of a team making an impact in a person’s life.”
 
Allen says he arrives at work each day with the mindset that he can positively impact someone’s quality of life through his words and his actions. As an individual who works with a population of adults with severe mental illness, his optimism is key.
 
“I want the clients I work with to feel valued and to know their needs are important to me and our staff,” Allen says. “It’s important for clients to know someone is listening.”
 
And his clients appreciate that approach, like one whom he was working with biweekly for the purpose of addressing appropriate forms of social interaction within the community.
 
“He would repeatedly introduce me to complete strangers as his case manager when we were in the community together, and he would plan his entire week around those two scheduled weekly appointments,” Allen says. “And over a period of time he became more confident in his ability to live independently and reconnect with family and friends. I genuinely care about the clients I connect with on a daily basis and want to see them win in a very tangible way.” 

Do Good: 

Volunteer with the Talbert House.

• Support the Talbert House by making a gift.

• Connect with the Talbert House on Facebook.
 

OSU Extension seeks community input from "future leaders"


If you’re between the ages of 14 and 30, Ohio State University Extension of Hamilton County wants your input on the concept of a perfect community and what that might look like. 

As a land-grant university, OSU Extension aims to bring “the knowledge of the university” to all Ohioans by “engaging people to strengthen their lives and communities.” 

“OSU Extension works with people of all ages and all walks of life. We hear from professionals and adults on a regular basis,” says Anthony Staubach, Interim County Extension Director. “But it’s important to hear from the 14- to 30-year-old population because they are our emerging leaders and will make key decisions in the future.” 

OSU Extension will conduct the “Community Reconsidered" focus group Saturday, driven by these questions: “What will be the most challenging trends and issues for Ohioans by the year 2035, and what are the best opportunities to leverage the strengths of the University and the OSU Extension to address those issues?”

It’s part of a national dialogue called “Extension Reconsidered.” 

For the past 100 years, OSU Extension has worked to better the lives of individuals all across the state, and Staubach says the goal is to now look 20 years into the future to figure out “what assets our generation will bring to the community, what opportunities exist for building a stronger community” and, finally, what role Extension will fulfill in a changing culture and a changing community. 

“We would like to hear from 30-60 residents in Hamilton County,” Staubach says. “We would like to get their honest and open opinion of the future and start to identify how OSU Extension can fit into that future.”

Do Good: 

• Share a meal and your ideas with other community members at Saturday's focus group, which begins at 6 p.m. March 14 at 5093 Colerain Ave. Register here.

• Join the Facebook event and share it with your friends. 

• Connect with Hamilton County Extension on Facebook.
 

National Kidney Foundation to offer free screenings March 12


More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease and many are completely unaware, which is why Perry Malloy, community outreach manager for the National Kidney Foundation, says it’s a “silent killer.”
 
In an effort to promote awareness and prevention, the NKF’s KEEP Healthy Program is offering free screenings throughout the month of March — National Kidney Month — one of which takes place 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday, March 12 at Tri-County Mall.
 
“One in three people is at risk for kidney disease,” Malloy says. “Risk factors include but aren't limited to diabetes, high blood pressure, (being) over the age of 60, African American, Pacific Islander or (having a) family history of chronic kidney disease. But you can slow the progression of kidney disease if you find out early.”
 
Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend the free screening, in which health professionals will measure participants’ Body Mass Index and blood pressure levels and evaluate samples from ACR tests which can identify protein present in the urine — often the first sign of kidney disease.
 
Malloy says participants should not be fearful, as there are no needles involved. Instead, it’s a way to engage in free preventative care and consult with medical professionals who can address any questions participants may have.
 
“With the statistics the way they are today, chances are you know someone with kidney disease,” Malloy says. “It affects more people than breast cancer and prostate cancer. It's the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S. Awareness is key, and if people will spend 15 minutes getting their kidneys screened they would learn how to prevent or slow the progression.” 

Do Good: 

•    Contact the National Kidney Foundation at 513-961-8105 to pre-register for Thursday's event. Walk-ins are also welcome. 

•    Spread the word to your friends and encourage them to get screened. 

•    Support the NKF by donating.
 

Local artist explores relationship among creativity, art, science with "Discover"


Local artist Susan Byrnes’ latest exhibition Discover debuts Friday evening at Brazee Street StudiosC-LINK Gallery with a free reception and artist talk.
 
Byrnes’ work showcases a variety of mediums — everything from glass, sound and scientific research — to bring together the interdisciplinary connections between art and science. For the past few years she's explored communities and their connections to art, and in a sense her work with molecular biologists from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center is a continuation of that work, she says.
 
“I am married to a molecular biologist and have always been struck by the similarities in our work habits, work environments, and creative approaches to problem solving,” Byrnes says. “I was interested in further exploring the practical similarities with the work process and perspectives on creativity that scientists have.”
 
So Byrnes, a Cincinnati Arts Ambassador Fellow, looked at research, textbooks and images and interviewed molecular biologists to produce audio samples of what it means to be creative in their line of work. The specialized language utilized by the molecular biologists, for example, fascinates her.
 
“It is incredibly dense and specific and about life and curiosity but expressed in a way you or I — writers, artists, poets, observers — wouldn’t usually use to describe it,” she says. “The scientific culture possesses a view of the world that I wanted to reveal through themes of wonder, failure and epiphany.”
 
The language, laboratory equipment — most things the general public thinks of when considering science — are more often than not, formulaic, Byrnes says, so the goal is to humanize the subject matter.
 
“I’m not sure how often the general public gets to experience things that have to do with science in any setting that is not sterile or clinical, which I find to be a somewhat intimidating environment,” she says. “I hope in this exhibit they will gain another perspective from an artist exploring the creativity of science.” 

Do Good: 

•    Check out the opening reception of Discover at 6-8 p.m. Friday, March 6, with the artist talk beginning at 7 p.m. The event is free. 

•    If you miss Friday evening's opening, the exhibition runs through April 3 with regular gallery hours.

•    Connect with the Cincinnati Arts Ambassador Fellowships' Facebook page.
 

Melodic Connections musicians gain on-the-job skills through CSO partnership


Three musicians from Melodic Connections are participating in a pilot program with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in which they'll volunteer once a week in the CSO offices at Music Hall to gain job readiness and social skills.
 
Melodic Connections aims to empower and build self-confidence in individuals with disabilities by providing music therapy and opportunities for lessons, group instruction and performance. The organization was recently a finalist in Cincinnati Social Venture Partners' 2015 Fast Pitch competition for local nonprofits.
 
“Volunteers will organize marketing materials and re-stock brochures around the offices, restock CDs in the gift shop, distribute materials to staff members, reset stanchions at the box office, greet visitors, and help with the preparation of mailings,” says Lynn Migliara, Melodic Connections’ communications manager.
 
While at Music Hall, the three will also have the opportunity to go behind the scenes, meet and interact with musicians and listen in on rehearsals.
 
For individuals like Joseph, one of the pilot program participants, it’s a chance to immerse himself even more fully in music.
 
Prior to finding out about Melodic Connections, Joseph spent most of his time alone in his apartment, socializing little and yearning for a more fulfilling day-to-day existence. But he’s now rediscovered a high school passion and talent: drums. In addition to making friends, performing for the public and attending weekly classes, half of each Monday will now be spent in an environment that should foster his growth even further.
 
"The opportunity for our students to volunteer at Music Hall for the symphony orchestra allows them to work on job-readiness skills and be integrated into the community,” says Christina McCracken, Melodic Connections’ board certified music therapist. “The students are already expressing a sense of pride and responsibility in their work for the symphony."

Do Good: 

•    Support Melodic Connections by donating.

•    If you have musical talent, other skills or just want to show your support, sign up to volunteer with Melodic Connections.

•    Connect with Melodic Connections on Facebook.
 

CWPC reaches out to young professionals with "Beer and Beethoven"


For 26-year old Laura Bock, who serves as Cincinnati World Piano Competition’s assistant to the executive director, world-class piano is part of her everyday being. For other young professionals, though, that exposure is less pronounced.
 
To engage more YPs with the talent of young artists who are locally and even internationally renowned while promoting the mission of the CWPC to “inspire and positively impact” the local community with classical piano music, the nonprofit is hosting Beer and Beethoven at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 5 at Rhinegeist Brewery in Over-the-Rhine.
 
“I think what will be cool about the event is the juxtaposition between the environment and the auditory experience — the one being very hard and industrial and the other being somewhat light and soothing,” Bock says.
 
Featuring CWPC competitor Julan Wang, the evening will merge world-class talent with familiarity and friendship.
 
“It blends something very common — grabbing a drink after work — and pairs it with something most likely quite uncommon for the attendees — the opportunity to hear a world-class pianist perform a solo recital,” Bock says. “This type of event is beneficial because it encourages the Cincinnati YP community to engage in a cultural experience that may be somewhat unfamiliar.” 

Do Good: 

•    Call 513-744-3501 or e-mail the Cincinnati World Piano Competition to reserve your $10 tickets for "Beer and Beethoven," which includes the performance and one beer.

•    Check out other upcoming events and the talent that CWPC showcases.

•    Support CWPC by donating.
 

Devou Park to gain 2,700 trees in reforestation effort


The Northern Kentucky Urban & Community Forestry Council’s annual Reforest Northern Kentucky program seeks volunteers who can assist in planting about 2,700 native tree seedlings across 2.8 acres of land in Covington’s Devou Park.

Over the past eight years, more than 2,000 volunteers have joined together to cover 30 acres worth of previously mowed property in an effort to restore Kentucky’s native woodlands.

According to Tara Sturgill, Reforest NKY secretary and chair of public relations subcommittee, the greatest impact of the event — aside from the planting of thousands of native trees — is the knowledge gained by those dedicating their time. 

“Volunteers learn proper planting of a tree, the multiple benefits to our communities of healthy native forests, selecting the most appropriate tree species for a specific location, and current impacts effecting our native forests,” Sturgill says. “And (they also gain) a general appreciation and yearning to be a steward of our natural woodland areas.”

In addition to planting trees at the event itself, 900 “take home” seedlings will be distributed to volunteers who can then apply their knowledge following the morning’s activity. 

For Sturgill, it’s important to cultivate “a spirit of stewardship for our native forests,” as the benefits of reforestation stretch far into the future. 

“Native woodlands provide improved air quality, storm water reduction, a habitat for various types of wildlife, increased property value, and natural spaces for education and recreation,” Sturgill says. “Reforestation is more than just planting trees and recreating a natural forested landscape. The value added by a woodland has advantages that cannot be measured by monetary means to our communities, and to us as individuals." 

Do Good: 

•    Register for Reforest Northern Kentucky on Saturday, March 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

•    Plant a tree at home or in your community and empower yourself with the knowledge of proper planting and care of your selected tree.

•    Support organizations and businesses that recognize the importance and value of trees.
 
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