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Health + Wellness : Cincinnati In The News

73 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati named 53rd best city to live in the U.S.


U.S. News & World Report did an in-depth study of American cities, and ranked the top 100 based on a number of criteria. Cincinnati came in at no. 53, and was the only city in Ohio to make the list.

To calculate the rankings, USN looked at the unemployment rate and the average salary of residents; the median cost of living and the annual cost of living in each city; the city's quality of life — the crime rate, the availability of quality healthcare, the quality of education, resident's overall satisfaction with living there and the average commute time; a desirability survey; and the net migration, or the number of births and deaths, in each city.

Cincinnati's overall score was a 6.5 — its quality of life score was a 6.5 and its value was a 7.7.

Check out how USN did the math.

See the top 100 best cities to live in the U.S. here.


 

New drug causing increase in drug overdoses in Cincinnati and beyond


Over the past few weeks, Cincinnati has made headlines for the number of drug overdoses occurring within Hamilton County. While many of these overdoses have been attributed to heroin, a number of them have been caused by something even more dangerous: carfentanil.

Carfentanil is the world's most powerful commercial opioid, and is 100 times more potent than the similar drug fentanyl, which is a controlled prescription painkiller, and is 50 times stronger than heroin. Carfentanil is an animal tranquilizer that was never intended for human use, and isn't widely popular among American veterinarians or zoos.

So why are people using it? How is it getting to the United States?

Read the full story, "How America Gets Its Deadliest New Drug," on Fast Company's website.
 

Walkable neighborhoods in U.S. cities are both wealthier and more highly educated


Urbanist Richard Florida writes in CityLab about a new report from the George Washington University School of Business regarding the effects of walkable places on the wealth and equity of U.S. metro areas. Cincinnati is rated #18 of the 30 metros studied and is ranked in the "lower-middle walkable urbanism" grouping, the second lowest of four tiers.

Florida explains that the report ranks walkability for America’s 30 largest metros using data on 619 walkable urban neighborhoods based on their high walk scores and large concentrations of office and/or retail space. It then examines the connection between metro walkability and factors like economic development (based on GDP per capita), educational attainment (the share of adults with college degrees) and social equity (based on housing and transportation costs, as well as the number of jobs near a given residence).

"While walkable neighborhoods occupy only one percent of land mass across the 30 largest metros, they account for the majority of office and multi-family rental development," Florida writes. "Between 2010 and 2015, the market shares of walkable urban places increased in all 30 metros, with 27 metros seeing their growth double since 2010."

The top-ranked tier of walkable cities includes (in order) New York City; Washington, D.C.; Boston; Chicago; San Francisco; and Seattle. Other cities ranked in the same tier as Cincinnati are Cleveland, Detriot, Houston, Miami, Los Angeles, Kansas City and St. Louis.

Read the full CityLab story here.
 

Want a bike-friendly city? Get ready to fail until it works, says Wired


Here's a fascinating article from Wired about building a bike-friendly culture in cities. Although it doesn't specifically mention Cincinnati, its findings and recommendations definitely apply to us.

"Building any infrastructure, anywhere, is a pain in the neck," writes Aarian Marshall. "You've got to find exactly the right government agencies, community groups, funding sources and contractors. And then you've got to figure out the logistics of construction and worry about the inevitable delays and cost overruns."

But Marshall then says not to despair, that there's good news for our soon-to-be bicycling-loving cities. "Across the country, usually stodgy governments are trying quick and dirty pilot projects, putting down cheap and temporary bicycle infrastructure and giving it a literal test drive (well, ride) before committing to the big stuff."

Like bike-only lanes along Central Parkway?

"Laying down temporary infrastructure before ginning up anything permanent also provides an opportunity to convince skeptics about the upsides of bike travel," Marshall writes. "Demonstration projects go a long way in terms of alleviating fears. Once residents see bicycle infrastructure in action, he says, they (usually) decide it doesn’t take up too much room or cost too much money. That makes it politically easier to build permanent protected lanes, bike boxes and signals."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Cincinnati ranked #4 healthiest U.S. city thanks to "highly rated" doctors


The Better Doctors website ranks the best doctors across the U.S. via a data-driven algorithm that accounts for a doctor's education, experience and referral network, and occasionally the site uses its data to tell related stories.

Last week the site ranked the 50 largest U.S. cities according to four criteria: the American Fitness Index of residents' fitness and general health, the percentage of residents with health coverage, the number of physicians per 1,000 residents and (the secret sauce) the percentage of doctors in each city "that are highly rated according to Better Doctor's comprehensive, seven-variable algorithm."

Cincinnati is ranked #4, up from #10 last year "with a large increase in highly rated doctors and relatively high ranking in all other categories," according to the story. The top three ranked cities are Minneapolis, Washington D.C. and Boston.

Better Doctors says it obtained data from the American Fitness Index, U.S. Census and its own proprietary data, coming up with a score for each city that weighted AFI at 40% of the overall score, the percentage of highly rated doctors at 20%, the number of primary care physicians per 1,000 residents at 20% and the percentage of residents with health insurance at 20%.

Read the full Better Doctor ratings here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

Ex-Gov. Beshear takes on current Gov. Bevin over Kentucky health care


Former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, who's barely two months out of office, has launched a campaign to try to stop his successor, Gov. Matt Bevin, from dismantling the health care initiatives he enacted.

"Gov. Bevin is working to take health care away from people who needed it desperately and for so long didn't have it," the Louisville Courier Journal quotes Beshear saying at a Feb. 12 news conference in Louisville. "I'm not going to let that opportunity be taken away from them without a fight."

Beshear has formed the organization Save Kentucky Healthcare to promote the changes he enacted to implement the Affordable Care Act, adding health coverage for more than 500,000 Kentuckians.

Read the full Louisville Courier Journal story here.
 

Can Cincinnati learn from these "top 10 urban innovations"?


Now that Cincinnati is testing its first streetcars and enjoys a variety of craft beer microbreweries, we can safely cross "Become a city of the future" off our civic to-do list.

But wait, what about 10 or 15 years from now when this "future" stuff will be boring and stupid? What are cities of the future planning for the next round of futuristic city living?

The Urban Edge — a blog from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University — provides a peek at the top 10 urban innovations happening around the world right now, according to a new World Economic Forum report.

"In its report, WEF seeks to answer the simple question: what will the cities of tomorrow be like? It highlights 10 innovations happening right now that may offer clues," says the intro to a Dec. 2 blog post.

The top 10 list includes digitally re-programmable space, an internet of freshwater pipes, adopting trees through social media, augmented humanity, unleashing share capacity and five others. Who wants to bet which one makes it to Cincinnati first?

Read the full Urban Edge blog post here.
 

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"


Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.
 

Oyler School's role in transforming Lower Price Hill praised by national education leader


"Imagine an old, abandoned end unit row house that is tall, slender in build, and neglected in infrastructure," writes Martin J. Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, in The Huffington Post's education blog. "For many years it's been a crack house, filled with needles — a revolving door of drugs and criminal activity. The back of this house overlooks a local schoolyard, where neighborhood children and youth come to learn and play. The house stands in contrast to a beautiful rebuilt school and is a reminder of the challenges students, educators, families, and the community face daily."

Blank then describes how the house offered an opportunity to be part of the amazing transformation of Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati thanks to the reconstruction of Oyler Community Learning Center.

Titled "What Happens When a Crack House Becomes an Early Childhood Learning Center?" the blog post describes how Oyler leaders helped renovate the house to become a neighborhood pre-school center.

The Robert & Adele Schiff Early Learning Center opened late last year, expanding a program that Oyler began by housing it inside the school.

Public radio education reporter Amy Scott premiered her documentary film about the same Lower Price Hill experiment, Oyler, in May at the school. It's screening Thursday night at the 2015 Cincinnati Film Festival.

Read the full Huffington Post column here.
 

City birds really are meaner


Gizmodo offers a little insight into modern urban life by citing a recent study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology, in which a group of researchers describe the differences in song sparrow behavior they observed in rural and urban areas.

"Out in the country, birds are always singing happily," the Gizmodo post begins. "But in the city, they squawk and fly into your face. Now scientists say there's actually a reason why city birds can be such aggressive jerks — and no, it's not the same reason why urban humans can be so terrible."

Read the Gizmodo post and find a link to the study here.
 

Cincinnati Children's named #3 overall pediatric hospital in U.S.


U.S. News & World Report released its ninth annual rankings of U.S. pediatric hospitals, and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center was recognized as #3 overall.

The rankings evaluate hospitals in 10 specialties, from cancer to urology, and in the new rankings 83 hospitals were ranked among the top 50 in at least one specialty. Twelve of the 83 ranked hospitals had high scores in three or more specialties and were named to the Honor Roll. Cincinnati Children's was one of only three hospitals to be ranked in all 10 specialties, and the other two (Boston Children's Hospital and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) ended up #1 and #2 overall, respectively.

See the full rankings here.
 

We're happy this Top 20 list doesn't include Cincinnati


Pest-control experts Orkin release a list each spring of the 20 worst mosquito cities in the U.S. based on the number of service calls the company makes to treat the buggers. There's finally a "top 20 cities" list that (thankfully) leaves off Cincinnati.

"Mosquito bites can transmit West Nile virus and other conditions that cause encephalitis — or swelling of the brain — as well as a relatively new virus in the United States called chikungunya virus," the Orkin report says. "In 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention upgraded chikungunya virus to a 'nationally notifiable condition' in the United States, providing state and local health departments with standard definitions for reporting and tracking cases."

If it's alright with you, just take that chikungunya somewhere else.

Read the Orkin rankings and helpful mosquito FAQs here.
 

Congress passes bill after Cincinnati push

Cincinnati government affairs guru Chip Gerhardt pushed the U.S. House of Representatives to pass the ABLE (Achieving a Better Life) Act last week, allowing people with disabilities to set up savings accounts with no tax on the earnings, similar to 529 college savings accounts, to cover housing, transportation and other expenses. Speaker of the House John Boehner was an active supporter. The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration. Read about Gerhardt's efforts on behalf of his teenage daughter and thousands of others with disabilities here.

An unlikely Friday night pizza cafe has a big heart

At Moriah Pie in Norwood, Ohio, Erin and Robert Lockridge serve homemade pizza and diners pay what they can. Read more.
73 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All
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