| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Cincinnati In The News

1777 Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati ranked fourth best city for 20-somethings


Cincinnati was recently ranked one of the top 10 best cities for 20-somethings by Move.org. Other cities in the top 10 include: Lincoln, Neb.; Minneapolis; Boise, Idaho; Lexington; Lubbock, Texas; Pittsburgh; St. Paul; Oklahoma City; and Madison, Wisc. Cincinnati came in at #4.

Move.org took the 100 most populated cities in the country, then evaluated them based on the following criteria:
  • Cost of living
  • Median gross rent
  • Unemployment rate in 2014
  • Median age
  • Singles between 20 and 34 years old
  • Number of bars and restaurants
  • Commuting under 30 minutes
  • Car-free commuters
See the full article here.
 

What happened to Cincinnati's subway system?


Cincinnati started construction on a subway system at the turn of the 19th century. The idea was that with the subway, the city's population would boom because people would be able to live and work in two different places, but still be able to get there quickly.

Work on the 16-mile loop never finished.

As history would have it, World War I, Prohibition, the stock market crash and World War II played a huge part in the demise of the subway. And although the city has tried to revive it, nothing has ever come of those plans. The abandoned tunnels remain locked and removed from the public eye.

With the streetcar opening scheduled for September, it seems the city is once again ready for mass public transit.

Read the full story here.



 

Walk through Findlay Market reveals 40 vendors & restaurants


Findlay Market is getting lots of attention this summer as new developments crop up around it and the streetcar opening looms near. USA Today recently named it one of the top U.S. food markets.

USA Today now has compiled a virtual "tour" of Findlay Market, complete with photos of vendors, merchants and restaurants. If you can't make it to the market, this tour is for you.

Take the full virtual tour here.
 

Liberty Center developers are leading the "town center" resurgence


The New York Times explores how the Easton Town Center in suburban Columbus has contributed to several influential turn-of-the-21st-century trends in land use and community design, helping to reintroduce density as an attractive and profitable real estate design principle.

“You could say that the period from 1950 to 1990 was an urban planning aberration,” said Yaromir Steiner, chief executive of Steiner and Associates in Columbus, who moved to the area to help design and develop Easton Town Center. “We are finally correcting all of this.”

Steiner and Associates has taken the town center concept further at Liberty Center off of I-75 in West Chester. The $300 million project opened late last year with plans for  800,000 square feet of retail space, 75,000 square feet of office space and 240 residences.

Lee Peterson, an executive vice president at WD Partners, a national design consultancy based in Columbus, estimated that after the development of Easton roughly 120 other mixed-use town centers have been built across the country.

Town centers, he said, are defying the trend of declining retail store sales nationwide.

“Town centers fit the scale that people like,” Peterson told The Times. “Bigger isn’t better. Better is better.”

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

GE at The Banks benefits from corporate America leaving the suburbs for downtowns


When General Electric starts moving its top executive team from a 70-acre wooded campus in Fairfield, Conn., to downtown Boston this month, The New York Times reports that the renovated red brick warehouses that will form part of G.E.’s new headquarters won’t even have a parking lot, let alone a spot reserved for the chief executive.

The move is part of a wave of similar decisions from large corporations to move headquarters back into downtown areas, including McDonald's, Motorola and Kraft Heinz relocating to downtown Chicago from far-flung suburbs.
 
“Part of it is that cities are more attractive places to live than they were 30 years ago and are more willing to provide tax incentives, and young people want to be there,” David J. Collis, who teaches corporate strategy at Harvard Business School, tells The Times. “But the trend also represents the deconstruction and disaggregation of the traditional corporate headquarters. The executive suite might be downtown, but you could have the back office and administrative functions in Colorado, the finance guys in Switzerland and the tax team in the U.K.”

The first 175 members of G.E.’s management team will move to Boston’s Fort Point section on Aug. 22, and a total of about 800 G.E. employees will be based there eventually.

“Hundreds of other workers in back-office functions like human resources, legal and finance will be scattered among G.E.’s existing locations in Cincinnati, Norwalk, Conn., and Schenectady, N.Y.,” The Times reports.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnati named one of top cities for beer


Real estate blog Redfin and the Beer Institute recently named Cincinnati as one of the top 15 beer cities in the country. It was ranked #14 on the list, just above San Francisco. Pittsburgh was ranked #1, followed by Buffalo, N.Y.; Milwaukee; Grand Rapids, Mich.; and Philadelphia.

Cities were ranked based on five criteria: the number of breweries in the state per every 100,000 adults age 21-plus; the number of active breweries in each state; state beer taxes; the median home sale price; and the city's Walk Score — also known as "Don't drink and drive."

Read the full story here.

Eric Avner and People's Liberty lauded for innovative approach to philanthropy


People's Liberty is a five-year experiment to see how philanthropy can be done differently and possibly even more effectively, CEO Eric Avner explains in an "Innovator of the Week" profile story from Urban Innovation Exchange. Avner and his team didn't want something permanent but instead devised a timeline with a sense of urgency.
 
"Building this as a separate brand from the (Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation) gives us ability to be more experimental, to have a slightly cheekier tone, a different pace, a different way of using tech and design," Avner tells UIX. "All of these things, whether storytelling or design or metrics or outreach or work culture, will ultimately make us better grant makers. It also sets the tone for how to reach people in ways that are more authentic without seeming stuffy, but do it in a different way than foundations typically operate."
 
Avner, Vice President and Senior Program Manager at the Haile Foundation, launched People's Liberty in summer 2014 and awarded its first grants later that year.

Detroit-based Urban Innovation Exchange is an initiative to advance the growing movement of people leading change in cities. Launched in 2012 as a three-year project funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, UIX now showcases catalytic talent transforming cities and neighborhoods across the U.S.

Soapbox's parent company, Issue Media Group, is a UIX national partner.

Read the full Urban Innovation Exchange story here.
 

Findlay Market named among nation's top historic food markets


Findlay Market was recently named one of the top food markets in the country by USA Today. Opened in 1855, Findlay Market is the oldest continuously operating market in the United States.

The market has a plethora of indoor vendors as well as farmers market stands set up outside on the weekends. Model Group is currently developing retail space and apartments around the market, with new businesses expected to open in these spaces.

You can find out more about Findlay Market, and others like it, here.
 

Artichoke OTR rated one of the 10 great U.S. cookware shops


The Food Network website is featuring Artichoke among the 10 great cookware shops in the U.S. in a listicle titled "Where Cooks Shop." The Over-the-Rhine store opened a few months ago just north of Findlay Market on Elm Street.

Andrea Strong highlights "finds for your kitchen at these cook-approved spots around the country," which include independently-owned shops in Brooklyn, Chicago and Philadelphia in addition to Artichoke.

Read the full Food Network list here.
 

New York Times does Cincinnati on a budget


The New York Times' "Frugal Traveler" section visits Cincinnati via a new report from Lucas Peterson, who takes in "a former boomtown that was once called the 'Paris of America' because of its inspired architecture and ambitious engineering projects."

"I discovered that Cincinnati has a complicated and fascinating history that bridges (quite literally) the Northern and Southern United States," he writes. "There are, of course, great opportunities for the budget-conscious traveler: gorgeous buildings, interesting museums, open-air markets and good food, including Cincinnati's famous chili."

Peterson tries Skyline in Clifton and Camp Washington Chili, spends time at Findlay Market and Museum Center at Union Terminal and experiences a transcendent moment at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

"There’s an odd quietness in the (slave) pen, which visitors are allowed to enter: an almost ghostly chill," he writes. "It's a potent piece of history, and one of the more impressive artifacts I've encountered in any museum, anywhere."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnati is home to unique food and drink not found elsewhere


Cincinnati is known for goetta, Skyline Chili and of course, beer, but those aren't the only things putting the city on the map. Chefs like Todd Kelly and restaurateurs like Jeff Ruby strive to provide diners with something different and tasty each time they visit.

Whether it's a five-star dining experience you seek or an ice cold pint, you're sure to find it in Cincinnati.

Read the full USA Today story here.

Four area colleges crack Forbes' list of Top Colleges


Four area colleges — Miami University, Northern Kentucky University, University of Cincinnati and Xavier University — made it onto Forbes' list of top colleges.

Forbes ranked 660 colleges and universities across the country that are "well worth the investment." Miami came in at #180, Xavier at #341, UC at #375, and NKU at #641.

See the full ranking here.
 

Greater Cincinnati ranked #9 among regions "where manufacturing is thriving"


Forbes Magazine says manufacturing in the U.S. has enjoyed a renaissance since 2009, gaining back 828,000 jobs since the recession. And the industrial heartland has been leading the charge, in sharp contrast to other areas of the economy.

Forbes has released its ranking of the 48 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 50,000 manufacturing positions, based on employment growth in the sector over the short-, medium- and long-term, going back to 2005, and factoring in momentum (whether growth is slowing or accelerating). Greater Cincinnati is ranked #9.

"Perhaps no sector in the U.S. economy generates more angst than manufacturing," Joel Kotkin writes in the list's introduction. "Over the past quarter century, manufacturing has hemorrhaged over 5 million jobs. The devastation of many regional economies, particularly in the Midwest, is testament to this decline. If the information sector has been the golden child of the media, manufacturing has been the offspring that we pity but can't comfortably embrace."

Yet over the period from 1997 to 2012, he continues, labor productivity growth in manufacturing is 3.3% per year, one-third higher than the rest of the economy. In addition, "a dollar of final demand for manufacturing generates $1.33 in output from other sectors of the economy, considerably higher than the multiplier for information ($0.80) and more than twice as high as such fields as retail trade ($0.66) and business services ($0.61). Other estimates place this impact far higher."

Forbes says manufacturing employment in Greater Cincinnati grew by 3.29 percent in 2015 and 11.92 percent from 2010 to 2015.

Read the full Forbes story here.
 

Arnold's celebrated as "truly a piece of history"


As most Cincinnatians know, Arnold's Bar and Grill was established on Eighth Street downtown in 1861 and is the city's oldest public house. The National Trust for Historic Preservation is now sharing that knowledge with the world via its website "Stories" section.

"With only minimal changes over its more than 150-year lifespan, Arnold's is truly a piece of history. It’s also a rocking place for live music and hearty food," the blog post says.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a privately funded nonprofit organization working to save America's historic places.

Read the full blog post here.
 

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 
1777 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts