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Cincinnati In The News

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Greater Cincinnati no. 1 metro area in sustainability


Site Selection released its 2017 Sustainability Rankings, which are driven by a unique index of factors. Ohio is the third most sustainable state in the U.S., and among U.S. metro areas, the Greater Cincinnati area landed itself at no. 1.

This ranking is in part because of companies like Procter & Gamble, which continues to pursue its own aggressive sustainability agenda. Recent green steps include investments in recycling and beneficial reuse that by 2020, will eliminate all manufacturing waste from P&G's global network of more than 100 production sites.

UC is also a leader in the sustainability game. The new $120 million Carl H. Lindner College of Business will be LEED Gold certified when it opens in 2019. Since 2004, UC has constructed six LEED-certified buildings, including the award-winning Morgans and Scioto student residence halls.

To see where other states, countries and metro areas ranked, click here.
 


Cincy's food scene affordable, accessible and boozy


Cincinnati's great restaurants and strong foodie scene recently landed it on WalletHub's list of the best cities in America for foodies.

The study looked at more than 180 of the largest U.S. cities across 24 data points, including affordability and accessibility of high-quality restaurants, food festivals per capita and craft breweries and wineries per capita.

Cincy came in at no. 20 on the list, and is one of the more foodie-friendly cities in the country. Here's how Cincinnati's food scene ranked in a few categories:
 
  • Average beer and wine price: no. 29
  • Restaurants per capita: no. 24
  • Affordability and accessibility of highly rated restaurants: no. 32
  • Gourmet specialty food stores per capita: no. 12
  • Craft breweries and wineries per capita: no. 11
  • Coffee and tea shops per capita: no. 32
To see how other cities stacked up, click here.


 

BLINK: by the numbers


This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
 
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.
 

 


DAAP connection pays off for UCLA professor


Casey Reas, professor of design media arts at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, has roots in Cincinnati: he's a graduate of UC's DAAP. His DAAP connections have landed him work with The National, an alt-rock band. 

Reas met The National's bassist, Scott Devendorf, and singer Matt Berninger when they were all graphic design students at DAAP — he even played drums for them, once upon a time.

The National just released its seventh album, "Sleep Well Beast," and Reas helped create four music videos for songs on the album. He used an open-source programming language called Processing, which he helped co-create, to make the videos.

Along with music videos, Reas' work has been exhibited in art galleries and projected onto buildings all over the globe.

To read more about Reas' process for creating The National's music videos, click here.
 

Locally founded Crossroads now the fastest-growing church in the U.S.


Crossroads has come a long way since its founding in 1995. It has 10 physical locations in Ohio and Kentucky (including three in Cincinnati and one more on the way), which equates to more than 28,000 parishoners.

Outreach Magazine recently named Crossroads the fastest-growing church in the U.S.; in 2016, its attendance jumped 26 percent. (Also, Crossroads has about 21,000 more members than the no. 2 fastest-growing church.)

To read more about Crossroads and view the other top 10 fastest-growing churches in the country, click here.
 

OTR named one of five Great Neighborhoods by the APA


Last week, the American Planning Association named Over-the-Rhine one of five Great Neighborhoods on its annual Great Places in America list. The list marks the kick-off for the APA’s National Community Planning Month celebration.

Like much of the city, OTR has undergone huge changes in the past 15 years, and it's now considered one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Planning efforts showcase the historic nature of OTR and will help preserve the neighborhood’s legacy.

As part of the distinction, Mayor John Cranley declared Oct. 4 “Over-the-Rhine ‘Great Neighborhood’ Day” in Cincinnati.

Through continued public-private partnerships and the ongoing support of the community’s residents, developers have been able to restore historic buildings like Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the former St. Paul's Evangelical Church (now home to Taft's Ale House); create community gathering spaces like Washington Park and Ziegler Park; and create new housing options all over OTR.

Along with OTR, APA also recognized Seward in Minneapolis; the Heart of Missoula; Uptown Greenwood, SC; and Pearl in San Antonio.

Click here to read more about APA's Great Places in America. 
 


Have you been to the Cincinnati Nature Center?


Only in Your State recently gave a shoutout to the Cincinnati Nature Center, which is the largest member-supported nature center in the country.

With two locations just outside of the city — one in Milford and the other in Goshen Township — the CNC is one of the region's best kept secrets. In total, it's home to 1,600 acres of natural landscape, 20 trails and countless opportunities to interact with nature.

You can visit the CNC as a day guest, but there are member-only perks. There are membership rates available to students and families on a one-year or two-year basis; click here for more infomation.

Read more about why Only in Your State loves the CNC.
 

UC's Crosley Tower considered one of nation's ugliest buildings


Cincinnati has a rich architectural history: some of its most historic buildings were designed by famed architect Samuel Hannaford, and residents are proud of its rich architectural history. Efforts continue to renovate and restore the city's gems, which is evident in the soon-to-reopen Music Hall and Union Terminal.

However, Crosley Tower at the University of Cincinnati was named one of the ugliest buildings in the U.S. by Architectural Digest. The magazine claims that the building looks like it's a single slab of concrete and would be a good home for a Disney villain. 

Crosley Tower isn't alone — click here to see the other seven buildings that made AD's list.
 

Cincinnati's rapid growth lands it as largest economy in Ohio


According to a report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Cincinnati was home to the 28th largest metropolitan economy in the U.S. in 2016. This growth makes Cincy the largest economy in the state of Ohio.

It's also one of the fastest-growing economies in the Midwest.

Among the 382 metropolitan areas included in the report, Cincinnati’s growth rate of 2.5 percent makes it the 106th fastest-growing in the country. Among the top 100 Metropolitan Statistical Areas by population, Cincinnati was the 37th fastest-growing in 2016.

Growth in non-durable goods manufacturing contributed to Cincinnati’s GDP growth the most, with construction, trade and information technology coming in close. Government’s contribution to Cincinnati’s economy declined.

To read the entire report, click here.
 


Two regional companies considered the best for working moms


Two local companies have been named among the best places for working moms by Working Mother Magazine.

The companies were ranked based on schedule flexibility, advancement programs and family support that allow working parents to be productive and satisfied.

According to Working Mother, new options for parents are making an impact on the workplace.

P&G, which ranked among the top 25 companies in the nation for working moms, has been among the top 100 best for 29 years. It provides an average of 16 paid weeks off for new moms and four paid weeks off for new dads; it also offers 16 paid weeks off for adoptive parents. P&G also has career counseling and backup childcare, plus telecommuting options for many of its employees.

TriHealth has been on the top 100 best list for the past 13 years, and offers an average of 12 paid weeks off for new moms. The healthcare provider offers subsidized backup childcare.

To see the full list of the top 100 workplaces for moms, click here.
 


Cincinnati is the coolest in the Midwest


We don't need to be told that Cincinnati is a cool place to live, but the website Only in Your State recently rounded up all of the reasons why.

Things that make the Queen City so cool are:

  • The growth in Over-the-Rhine
  • Its growing food scene
  • How it celebrates the arts
  • The craft beer
  • Its efforts to preserve historic landmarks
  • The riverfront views
  • The parks
  • Fiona
  • Its celebrations

To read more, click here.
 


The numbers don't lie: Cincinnatians know how to have a good time


According to a recent study from WalletHub, Cincinnati is the 13th most fun of the top 150 largest U.S. cities. The study examined 58 key metrics, including the number of fitness centers per capita to movie costs to the average open hours of breweries.

Here's how Cincinnati ranked in a few of these categories:
 
  • No. 9: Park playgrounds per capita
  • No. 15: Bar accessibility (have you been to Over-the-Rhine lately?)
  • No. 20: Festivals per capita (Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, Taste of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Food and Wine Classic, etc.)
  • No. 22: Restaurants per capita
  • No. 24: Average beer price (about $5 a pint)
  • No. 26: Fitness centers per capita
  • No 33: Number of attractions (Findlay Market, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Reds, Bengals, etc.)
  • No. 40: Parkland acres per capita
  • No. 61: Dance clubs per capita
  • No. 75: Movie costs
The full report is available here
 

Cincinnati Art Museum to showcase collection of work by Iris van Herpen


In October, Dutch fasion designer Iris van Herpen will bring a touring exhibition of her work to the Cincinnati Art Museum. The show, Transforming Fashion, originated at the Groninger Museum in the Netherlands in 2012.

Van Herpen is known for her unique designs and interest in the natural sciences. She uses unexpected materials and 3D printing to create her rare, "strangely gorgeous garments."

Examples of van Herpen's work include a minidress that resembles a stylized skeleton that was 3D-printed with a white synthetic polymer and the “moon dress” of 2013-14: a doughnut-shaped garment whose iridescent black resin surface is textured and cratered.

You can read more about van Herpen here; keep tabs on her upcoming exhibition at the CAM.


 

Affordability makes Cincy hotbed for tech talent attraction


According to a new report from CBRE Group Inc., Ohio has some of the lowest living expenses in the U.S. for attracting tech talent, with Cincinnati among the leading cities.

The report shows that Cincinnati is the sixth-most affordable tech market in the U.S., with the Midwest home to four of the top six markets. The results are based on the rent-to-tech wage ratio in 50 U.S. cities.

Columbus came in at no. 1 with a ratio of 11.3 percent, followed by Oklahoma City (11.4 percent), St. Louis and San Antonio (12.6 percent each), Indianapolis (12.7 percent) and Cincinnati (13 percent).

Those six cities are also among the top 10 markets for the most affordable apartment rents. New York has the least affordable tech market (35 percent), followed by Long Island and Los Angeles.

To read the full report, click here.

 


CVG lauded for excellence at Travel Weekly's Magellan Awards


For the third year in a row, CVG received a number of accolades from Travel Weekly’s Magellan Awards, and was the only airport to receive a gold award.

The airport received two gold awards — one for its #ProjectGratitude social media campaign and the other for its miniature therapy horse program. It also took home a silver award for its terminal videos.

The gold award in Social Media highlights CVG’s dedication to its mission to provide passengers a positive experience. To celebrate its 70th anniversary, CVG is performing 70 acts of gratitude throughout the year to surprise and delight travelers, as well as thank them for choosing CVG. All is documented on CVG’s social media channels (@flyCVG on Facebook, @CVGairport on Twitter and Instagram).

Winning the gold award in the Special Needs category is a nod to CVG’s partnership with Seven Oaks Farm to bring miniature therapy horses to the airport’s terminal twice a month. The program helps ease passengers’ anxiety and puts smiles on their faces.

The third award, silver in Special Needs, recognizes CVG’s effort to make travel by air stress-free and available to all. The terminal videos are located on CVG’s website to allow travelers to watch the videos prior to their flight in order to easily navigate various areas of the airport. The videos have a special accessibility feature for visual and hearing impaired individuals.

Each year, Travel Weekly receives entries from around the world, and awards those projects that represent the best in the travel industry in a broad range of industry segments, including hotels, online travel services, airlines, airports and more.

Click here to check out the other winners.
 
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