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Internationally renowned photographer features local families in "ReelBeauty" program


While the ReelAbilities Film Festival won’t return to Cincinnati until March 2017, nonprofit organizer Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled (LADD) has put together a series of monthly “ReelPrograms” happenings leading up to the main event.

Intended to build anticipation for ReelAbilities, the region’s largest film festival, and also prompt dialogue about the abilities of those labeled as “disabled,” ReelPrograms will feature everything from encore screenings of past years’ award-winning films to the ReelBeauty photography exhibition that made its debut at Christ Church Cathedral last month. 

The exhibition features the work of Rick Guidotti, internationally known fashion photographer turned activist and founder of Positive Exposure, a nonprofit aiming to shift perceptions of those living with physical, genetic, intellectual or behavioral differences.

“I see beauty everywhere,” says Guidotti, who hopes to challenge viewers to “change how they see,” then “see how they change.” 

Guidotti photographed 12 local families to produce a collection of 22 photos for ReelBeauty. Rather than walking down the street and choosing to stare at someone or make eye contact then quickly look away, he says his aim in photographing those with differences is to showcase the shared humanity one can only recognize after steadying one’s gaze and looking directly into another person’s eyes. 

“There are individuals everywhere in the world that don’t want to be seen as diseased or as a diagnosis,” Guidotti says. “We all want to be seen as human beings.” 

Photos will remain on display through the end of May.

Do Good: 

• Check out ReelBeauty. at Christ Church Cathedral, 318 E. Fourth St. downtown. Gallery hours are 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday. 

• Mark your calendar for other upcoming ReelPrograms.

Connect with Cincinnati ReelAbilities on social media or by getting involved as a volunteer or supporter. 
 

Impact 100 seeking Young Philanthropist Scholarship applicants


Impact 100 is currently accepting applications for its 2017 class in the Young Philanthropist Scholarship Program

Impact 100 awards more than $100,000 each year to Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky nonprofit agencies, with over $3.6 million donated since its inception in 2001. Every dollar from each $1,000 annual membership fee goes directly to the grant pool.  
 
The Young Philanthropist Scholarship Program is meant for young women who have an interest in philanthropy but can't fund a full Impact 100 membership on their own. Each grant applicant chooses a focus area in one of the following categories: culture, education, environment, family and health and wellness.
 
“The program is a means to encourage young members to experience women’s collective giving,” Impact 100 President Donna Broderick says. 
 
Do Good:

• Do you know someone who would be a good fit for the Young Philanthropist Scholarship Program? Encourage them to apply by the April 30 deadline. 

Donate to the Young Philanthropist Scholarship Fund.

• For more information on how you can get involved, contact Impact 100 directly.
 

"Slavery by Another Name" panel discussion connects with current fair housing issues


The second part in a series of panel discussions focusing on modern-day slavery will take place April 28, with topics pulled from Douglas Blackmon's book and documentary film, Slavery by Another Name.

"We want to educate people about our history and how it's still affecting us today," says Lydia Morgan, event coordinator. "That part of our history is affecting black men and minority men in general. I think a lot of people who have watched that documentary or read the book are totally shocked about what went on."

Slavery by Another Name focuses on issues around the idea of forced labor after most people assumed that slavery ended with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. The book/documentary follows the re-enslavement of black Americans from the Civil War to World War II and discusses how forced labor made its way into modern day society. 

The event is free and open to the public and is presented by Housing Opportunities Made Equal (HOME) of Cincinnati. The discussion comes after the U.S. Housing and Urban Development announced that turning down tenants or buyers based on their criminal records may violate the Fair Housing Act, Morgan says.

Do Good:

Register to attend the Slavery by Another Name discussion at 5-7 p.m. Thursday, April 28 at United Way of Greater Cincinnati, 2400 Reading Road in Walnut Hills.

• For more information, contact Chloe Gersten.

• Stay up-to-date on recent discussions on Facebook.
 

Cincy YP and Metro team up to promote public transit to the bar crowd


For the third straight year, Metro and Cincy YP, a Give Back Cincinnati programs aimed specifically at young professionals, have partnered to promote public transportation in a fun and engaging way.
 
The Late Night Test Ride is scheduled for Saturday, April 23 and will run a route through a multitude of Cincinnati neighborhoods that YPs frequent. Over-the-Rhine, the Central Business District, East Walnut Hills, Clifton (near UC’s main campus), Oakley, Hyde Park and O’Bryonville are among the stopping points, while more than 17 popular venues like Hang Over Easy and Below Zero Lounge will offer riders food and drink specials.
 
“Transportation is so important among the millennial generation,” says Kaitlyn Kappesser, Cincy YP Events Director and Metro liaison. “We're the generation that doesn't want to be dependent on cars, but we also like to be social late at night. This is where Metro creating a late night route comes into play — we get the best of both worlds.”
 
The Metro will run 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Participants can take unlimited rides for as little as $5, and event passes that include unlimited rides in addition to drink specials at participating venues are available for $8. 
 
“Cincinnati’s YP leaders truly get how important public transit is to our community, and their commitment to encouraging their peers to use Metro is inspiring,” says Kim Lahman, Metro’s Outreach and Sustainability Manager. “The Late Night Test Ride provides us with a safe, fun and adventurous way of introducing young professionals to Metro’s service, while allowing them to get to know our community and one another better.”

Do Good: 

• Purchase your $8 event pass, which includes unlimited rides and drink specials the night of April 23, here

• Volunteers are needed to staff designated stops along the route from 8-10 p.m. Sign up here. Once your shift is finished, you can join the fun for free.

• Learn more about Cincy YP by connecting on Facebook.
 

Cincinnati NEW to host Wall Street powerhouse for annual speaker series


Carla Harris, senior client advisor and vice chairman of global wealth management at Morgan Stanley, is the keynote speaker for Cincinnati's Network of Executive Women's (NEW) annual speaker series on Thursday, April 21.
 
Founded in 2001, NEW is a national organization that uses leadership development, networking and education events to advance women and men in the consumer products and retail industry. There are nearly 10,000 members from 750 various companies all across the country, says Kim Markle, Cincinnati NEW committee chair.
 
Harris will speak about “The New Way to Start Out, Step Up or Start Over in Your Career," which is based on her recently published book, Strategize to Win.
 
NEW brings in speakers each spring and fall, usually prominent businessmen and women who can offer insights around leadership. The April 21 event will feature a networking event following Harris’ keynote.
 
"It's not always about work," Markle says. "It's about who you get to know that will help you professionally, who can make you more well rounded."
 
Do Good:

Register to attend the Cincinnati NEW event at 1:30-6 p.m. April 21 at Horseshoe Casino downtown.

• Learn more about NEW’s mission and vision.

Join the Cincinnati chapter of Network of Executive Women.
 

Female community leaders mentor girls with 3D printers


Over the course of 10 weeks, a group of female community leaders traveled to South Avondale Elementary every Thursday to mentor fifth-grade girls using a 3D printer. The initiative was a collaboration among United Way's Women of Tocqueville, Women Investing in the Next Generation (WINGs) and the Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative.

South Avondale Elementary was just one of 13 local schools participating in the project. The women who served as mentors came from varying fields — consultants, lawyers, coaches, attorneys — and Kelly Dehan, a Women of Tocqueville member, served as project manager. 

The students used the printer to make simple items like jewelry and keychains. But they also focused on what they could invent to solve a problem.

"The 3D printer is especially nice because here you are doing research on what you can invent to make life easier," Dehan says. "It was really rewarding for all of us to watch."

The students came up with the idea of a phone cradle — something that would hold a phone while it played videos — so that instead of leaning their phones up against a hard surface they could use the cradle. 

South Avondale was able to keep the printer for future use by its students. 

"I think the process of thinking problems through, working with others and bonding gave them a renewed sense of confidence," Dehan says. "You could definitely see the confidence and can-do spirit improve over a several week period."

Do Good:

Donate to support United Way's programs. 

Learn more about Women Investing in the Next Generation (WINGs) 

• Find out how you can help support the Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative.
 

Boost local economy by shifting your buying habits


Green Umbrella’s Local Food Action Team, the Central Ohio River Valley Local Food Guide and Northside Farmers Market have teamed up to inspire individuals to eat local, an idea the community will both promote and celebrate at “Eat, Shift, Party LOCAL” April 20.
 
Green Umbrella will launch a campaign at the free event encouraging individuals to pledge a 10 percent shift in their food budgets.
 
“If 10 percent of our Greater Cincinnati population pledges to shift just 10 percent of their food budget to locally produced food, it will infuse over $52 million into our local economy,” Green Umbrella Executive Director Kristin Weiss says.
 
In addition to building the local economy, eating local promotes good health, tastes better, allows local families to feel and be supported and preserves open green space, according to Green Umbrella’s Top 5 Reasons to Eat Local. It’s also affordable and more doable than you might think.
 
“For the average family, taking the shift means spending only $12 a week on local food,” says Marian Dickinson, local food advocate with Green Umbrella.
 
The Central Ohio River Valley Local Food Guide will release its 2016 publication of local food directories at the event, educating eaters and growers on how to promote a more vibrant local food economy, and festivities will take place within the setting of the Northside Famers Market at North Presbyterian Church, so individuals know of at least one place to return to for local products after pledging their 10 percent shifts.
 
In 2016, specifically, the Farmers Market — a year-round effort — is promoting its Get Local Food Challenge, which features a different local item each month. Cooking classes for both children and adults are also offered throughout the year to encourage patrons to buy local but to also feel empowered when preparing food.
 
All parties involved are working collectively to direct people’s attention toward locally sourced products, and Green Umbrella is making it easy to follow-through after pledging by distributing a monthly newsletter with tips, recipes and updates on the local scene.
 
“It’s a decision you can feel good about,” Dickinson says. 

Do Good: 

• Plan to attend Eat, Shift, Party, LOCAL at 5-7 p.m. April 20 at North Presbyterian Church

• Make the pledge.

• Check out other available resources for eating local
 

DePaul Cristo Rey seniors achieve 100 percent college acceptance for second straight year


For the second consecutive year, DePaul Cristo Rey (DPCR) High School seniors have achieved a college acceptance rate of 100 percent. The senior class of 39 individuals met the school-wide goal months in advance of graduation and has earned nearly $1.7 million and counting in merit-based college scholarships. 

“To do something this significant one time is an accomplishment,” DPCR Principal Andrew Farfsing says. “To do it twice creates a tradition.”

Last year’s graduating class was the school’s first since DPCR opened in 2011 as Greater Cincinnati’s first new Catholic high school in 50 years, and all 48 seniors were accepted to college. Farfsing acknowledges the first two classes have set the bar high, but he’s confident future classes can continue the legacy.

“With our school's focus on college-preparation and the commitment and zeal of our teachers and students, I have no doubts future classes can reach that bar,” he says. 

Students have committed to universities like Purdue and Xavier so far, but not everyone has finalized his or her decisions. 

Paige Yaden, for example, has been accepted to five colleges and is weighing her options. 

“For me, being accepted to five schools is awesome,” she says. “A few years ago, I didn’t think I would be accepted anywhere. My freshman year grades were bad; sophomore year was worse. But I got it together junior year and have been on the honor roll every quarter this year.”

Students like Maggie McDonald, who will attend XU’s School of Nursing, credit their teachers’ compassion and dedication for pushing her classmates to strive for greatness.

“The teachers make everything happen here,” McDonald says. “They love us. They made sure we knew we had this goal, and they wanted us all to get accepted. I was proud of everybody for reaching this point. There were some students in the beginning who slacked off, but as they started to believe we could do it like the seniors last year they really started working.”

According to the Cristo Rey Network, which comprises 30 schools nationwide, 96 percent of its student population comes from families with an average annual income of $34,000.

Do Good: 

• Support DePaul Cristo Rey's mission and learn about ways to give.

• Learn about volunteer opportunities at DPCR.

• Connect with DPCR on Facebook.
 

Brazee Street Studios looking for artists to join Mini Bead Marathon and Art Supply Swap April 23


Brazee Street Studios will host its first-ever Mini Bead Marathon April 23 to back Beads of Courage, a national arts-in-medicine program that supports children coping with serious medical issues.
 
Artists gather at Brazee every September for National Bead Challenge Day, when they create glasswork that enables children to record and share their own stories of hope through jewelry creation. The Oakley-based studio is extending its support for Beads of Courage, however, by asking skilled volunteers to stop by for a two-hour shift April 23 to utilize their talents for good.
 
Volunteers will work specifically on birthday beads, beads for the upcoming holidays, transportation beads and dream beads.
 
“These beads are tangible signs of hope and progress for the kids who receive them,” says Chelsea Borgman, Brazee’s gallery coordinator. “They show the kids, their families and the world just how much they’ve overcome.”
 
The event runs 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Food and non-glass bead making activities will be provided by Brazee, which is also supplying glass artists with free torch time and, of course, glass.
 
In addition to creating beads, the new Beads of Courage Volunteers Superstars program will be introduced. The goal is to foster skill building and community not only among bead makers in the studio but also between bead makers and bead recipients.
 
“We’re proud to work with Beads of Courage each year to brighten the days of brave children undergoing difficult medical treatments,” Borgman says.
 
In conjunction with the Mini Bead Marathon, Brazee will also host its fifth annual Art Supply Swap, in which creatives can drop off unwanted supplies in exchange for useable materials. Drop-off begins at 9:30 a.m., and leftover supplies will be donated to Indigo Hippo, which makes art more accessible to children and other local artists in need of added support when it comes to obtaining supplies.

Do Good: 

• If you're a skilled glassworker, contact Brazee Street Studios to volunteer at the Mini Bead Marathon April 23.

• Even if you're not a glassworker yourself, the event is family-friendly. Stop by between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to join in festivities and watch the artists in action. 

• Bring any unneeded art supplies to swap out for materials that may be of use to you. Drop-offs begin at 9:30 a.m.
 

CYC alum a testament to impact of mentorship


Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) is a testament to the impact mentoring plays in a student’s life. For the past five years, an average 95 percent of its students have graduated high school — a statistic Gov. John Kasich acknowledged last week when discussing statewide education initiatives.
 
Why did he mention CYC, in particular? Because its students succeed while the districts CYC serves are, on average, graduating 63 percent of their high schoolers.
 
Upon graduating high school, many CYC students continue their path to success by enrolling in college, enlisting in the armed forces or securing gainful employment. Take Shandreanna Martin, for example.
 
“My graduation from college began in the sixth grade, when I sat down across the table from my mentor for the first time,” Martin says.
 
She graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 2015 and remains close to this day to her mentor, Lori Meyer, who has since relocated to Wisconsin.
 
“Prior to first meeting Lori, I felt she wouldn't have much to do with me,” Martin says. “I felt for a short time it was a pity party — as if she only did this to help and that (our relationship) would be over after that school year.”
 
So when the two continued to meet year after year, the relationship blossomed into more than Martin could have ever expected.
 
“She really touched a part of my life,” Martin says. “My self-confidence and self-value has skyrocketed because of her. I feel I can accomplish anything I set my mind to and am currently looking forward to returning to school for a Computer Technology Communications degree, be it a Master’s or even another Bachelor’s.” 

Do Good: 

Change lives by becoming a mentor.

• Support the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative by participating in the United FORE Youth Golf Classic May 10. 

• Connect with CYC on Facebook.
 

Louder Than a Bomb poetry slam gives voice to local teens


Students from all across the tristate area will participate in the final round of the world's largest youth poetry slam, Louder Than a Bomb (LTAB), on Saturday, April 9 at the School for Creative and Performing Arts.

DePaul Cristo Rey, Walnut Hills, Hughes and Elementz Hip Hop Youth Center students, as well as 15 individual students from various schools, will use spoken word and poetry to describe their experiences growing up in the Queen City. LTAB, born in Chicago in 2001 as a way to give ostracized and disenfranchised youth a platform to share their unheard stories through poetry, allows youth to engage with one another, tell their own stories and listen to the stories of their peers. 

Desirae "The Silent Poet" Hosley is a spoken word artist, poet, author and community organizer who has worked as a LTAB coach since 2014. 

"I love working with these amazing teens because I get a chance to be that ear for them," Hosley says. "They just want to be heard. Being a teaching artist that focuses on performance, I was able to connect on a level that made their poem come to life and, not only did it come to life, it helped everyone see the fight in their eyes and sincerity of their poetry."

Coaches work with students, mentoring and guiding them as they find creative ways to tell their stories on stage. Hosley herself has seen teens speak about hard-to-discuss issues like poverty, race and sexual orientation in front of a bunch of strangers.

Being able to have a platform to be heard gives students a boost of self-confidence. 

"One thing that separates each teen poet from the masses is that they had the courage to step on stage and become vulnerable in room of people who don't know their story," Hosley says. "And in that moment, they will grow an inch taller and stronger in who they are."

Do Good:

Register for free tickets to Louder Than a Bomb at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 9, at SCPA's Corbett Theater, 108 W. Central Pkwy., Downtown/Over-the-Rhine.

• Read about previous Louder Than a Bomb competitions winners

• Find out how you can get involved with Louder Than a Bomb by visiting its website
 

CSO engages community in Orchestras Feeding America fight to address food insecurity


It’s an exciting weekend at the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, as the ensemble will perform an all-Spanish program while also collecting non-perishable food and hygiene-related items Friday and Saturday in an effort to support the Freestore Foodbank.

One in six Tristate individuals are at risk of facing food insecurity, a prime reason why the CSO participates in the national Orchestras Feeding America (OFA) initiative to fight hunger across the U.S. The CSO is one of more than 450 orchestras working hard to engage the community to show they’re more than just a musical group. 

Since OFA’s inception, 475,000 pounds of food have been collected and distributed to those in need. Here at home, the CSO also provides further incentive for its patrons to donate. 

“Offering discounted tickets ($10) with a canned food donation at Friday’s concert is a way to make a world-class, live performance as accessible as possible while at the same time supporting the work of the Freestore and helping neighbors in need,” CSO Vice President of Communications Chris Pinelo says. 

And the world-class live performance is not one to be missed, as Latin Passion features not only the CSO but also partial staging, a full chorus, a multitude of vocal soloists, a Spanish guitarist and flamenco dancing and singing. 

“The CSO really brings the world to Cincinnati each season, engaging a diverse array of artists from around the globe and exploring different repertoire,” Pinelo says. “The music for this ‘Latin Passion’ program is lush, exciting and beautiful, sure to thrill any audience.”

Do Good: 

• Support the Cincinnati Symphony and Orchestras Feeding America by donating a non-perishable food item or hygiene product at a performance this weekend (8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Music Hall). With a donation, $10 tickets are available for Friday's performance. 

• If you can't donate this weekend, support the Freestore Foodbank any day of the week.

Support the CSO and plan to attend an upcoming performance. 
 

Crossroads' Beans and Rice week raises nearly $259,000 for 8 organizations


Crossroads members recently committed to collectively give nearly $89 million throughout the next three years as a part of the “I’m In” campaign, so when its annual Beans and Rice week approached last month the church was hesitant to ask for added contributions.

“We wondered whether Beans and Rice was too big of an ‘ask’ this year coming out of the campaign,” says Jennifer Sperry, Crossroads’ manager of client services and media relations. 

The goal of Beans and Rice is to eat cheaply for one week, save the money one would have spent at the grocery store or restaurants and instead put it toward a cause — in this case, toward a few different causes — to benefit organizations outside of the church.

In spite of initial hesitation, Crossroads decided to proceed with Beans and Rice for the fourth year. The result was nearly $259,000 raised for eight organizations both locally and across the world. 

The Cincinnati Recreation Foundation and Talawanda Recreation Incorporated will receive $50,000 to provide free swim lessons to 2,500 kids this summer at 25 local pools. According to Crossroads, it’s important — particularly among minority communities — as 30 percent of Caucasians don’t know how to swim while 60 percent of Hispanics and more than 70 percent of African Americans are also without the skills needed to stay afloat.

Other local organizations to benefit from the funds include those working to address the heroin epidemic: Teen Challenge Cincinnati, Teen Challenge KY, Prospect House and Heroin HopeLine

“We tend to choose organizations and funds each year based on what we're passionate about and what we know will make the biggest impact,” Sperry says. 

Nationally, the Flint Child Health and Development Fund, which supports both short- and long-term needs of children exposed to lead, is the recipient of $30,000, while internationally the church’s partner Amigos for Christ will receive more than $58,000 to bring clean water to children in Nicaragua. 

“The money going to fund a water system in Nicaragua is already at work, as we broke ground on the project last Monday. Talk about return on investment,” Sperry says. “We are so encouraged not only by the campaign and the fulfillment we've seen thus far, but that people stepped up to do Beans and Rice in the midst of so much sacrifice already happening. There is power when thousands of us come together to commit and focus on one goal.”

Do Good: 

• Even though Beans and Rice week has culminated, it's never too late to practice sacrificial giving on your own. Even if you don't normally have time to prepare food on your own, a meal of beans and rice at Chipotle costs $1.80. 

• Support organizations working to make our city, nation and world a better place. 

Learn more about Crossroads.
 

Sherbro Foundation to host free program about community building in Sierra Leone


When Arlene Golembiewski met Chief Charles Caulker in Sierra Leone four decades ago, she was a Peace Corps volunteer. She revisited the country in 2011 for a second time and reconnected with Caulker, who had established a secondary school for young girls whose parents couldn't afford to pay the $20 a year for them to attend.

Seeing a need in the community, Golembiewski created a scholarship fund for families to send their daughters to school. 

She returned to Sierra Leone many times after and then, in an attempt to give the Bumpeh Chiefdom a volunteer presence in the U.S., founded Sherbro Foundation in 2013. 

Golembiewski, a Columbia-Tusculum resident and Procter & Gamble retiree, and Caulker will be at the Hyde Park Methodist Church on April 6 at 7 p.m. to discuss Sherbro Foundation and its partnership with Chief Caulker. Their programs include advancing girls' education, adult literacy and computer literacy to help the Bumpeh Chiefdom people overcome poverty.

"The program is meant to be a unique opportunity for people not to just hear from someone in Sierra Leone but from a traditional leader in Sierra Leone," Golembiewski says. "This is one of the things that makes our work different — if not unique — in that we're working with the local community and their leader down to the village level."

Chief Caulker has lead Bumpeh Chiefdom for three decades, including an 11-year long civil war and 2014 Ebola outbreak. The chiefdom is one of Sierra Leone's most rural and poor chiefdoms; most residents live on $1 a day. 

But disaster didn't stop Caulker from feeling defeated. 

In collaboration with Sherbro Foundation, Caulker created the first Community Computer Center. And most recently, the chiefdom is trying to introduce village fruit orchards that will empower residents to generate a sustainable income to fund their children's education and community development. 

Golembiewski encourages anyone who is interested in learning about Sierra Leone and helping the country rebuild to attend the free program. 

"Everyone here can make a difference," she says. "People think it's difficult to tackle something like poverty in one of the poorest countries on the other side of the world, but it's not impossible."

Do Good:

• Attend the program at 7 p.m. April 6 at Hyde Park Methodist Church, 1342 Grace Ave., Hyde Park.

Donate to help support Sherbro Foundation's programs and mission.

Contact Arlene Golembiewski for more information on how you can help.
 

Envision Children "Lighting the Way" for youth educational success


If you want to experience an afternoon on the town while supporting a local nonprofit that invests in children and their education, then add “Lighting the Way” at Prime 47 downtown to your calendar for April 10.
 
“This is our 11th annual Lighting the Way Scholarship Fundraiser & Gala,” says Sheryl McClung McConney, founder and president of Envision Children. “And we’re especially excited this year about the wonderful food our guests will enjoy at this year’s venue … a buffet supper with scrumptious selections like steak, oysters, asparagus, macaroni and cheese and much more.”
 
The event will also feature a cash bar, live music, auction opportunities and an awards ceremony to honor the nonprofit’s volunteers and supporters.
 
“We’ve added some exciting new things too this year: sideline games like ‘Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader’ and four ‘Program Stations’ with a student who will answer questions about each of Envision Children’s four main programs – Summer Academic Enrichment, ACT Boot Camps, Tutoring and Power Saturdays,” McClung McConney says.
 
It’s tutoring programs like these that comprise the foundation for Envision Children’s work within the community, and with your support at events like “Lighting the Way” you’ll help fund scholarships for underserved students living in poverty.
 
“What sets Envision Children apart from other organizations is our focus on making a long-term impact on the lives of the students we serve,” McClung McConney says. “We also help students make their education their top priority and to lay a foundation for them to go on to excel in life.” 
 
Do Good: 

Attend "Lighting the Way" 2-5 p.m. April 10 at Prime 47, 580 Walnut St., downtown. 

• If you can't attend, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support the organization. Make checks payable to Envision Children and mail to P.O. Box 37040, Cincinnati, OH 45222.

Contact Envision Children if you know of a child in need of services or if you are interested in volunteering as a tutor. 
 
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