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Talent : Cincinnati In The News

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How transportation planning is stuck in the past

A new report from the National League of Cities, "City of the Future: Technology & Mobility," details the many challenges city and regional leaders face in adapting their planning efforts to coming workforce and demographic changes. Bob Graves, associate director of the Governing Institute, writes about the report's findings in Governing Magazine.

"For all we hear about the impact that technology and social changes are having on urban mobility, you'd certainly expect to see their influence reflected in city transportation planning," he says. "For the most part, unfortunately, this simply isn't the case."

In short, Graves writes, the NLC study finds that the cities' planning efforts focus heavily "on the problem of automobile congestion and prescribe increased infrastructure in the form of new roads as the primary cure."

The study analyzed city and regional transportation planning documents from the 50 most populous U.S. cities as well as the largest cities in every state, for a total of 68 communities. Cincinnati didn't make the cut, but our regional planning shortcomings are certainly echoed in the report.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers

The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.

Did Kentucky governor's race kill political polling?

Politicians like to say that the only poll that matters is on Election Day. That's starting to be more true, according to analysis in Governing Magazine.

Writer Alan Greenblatt points out that polls in the Kentucky governor's race consistently showed Democrat Jack Conway with a slight lead over Republican Matt Bevin. Not only did Bevin win, but it wasn't even close, as he took 53 percent of the vote to Conway's 44 percent.

The day after the election, The Lexington Herald-Leader announced it would dump Survey USA as its pollster.

"We might as well buy monkeys and dartboards vs. what we had here with Survey USA," Greenblatt quotes Kentucky Republican consultant Scott Jennings.

"The problems aren't limited to the Bluegrass State," the article says. "Last year, polls around the country underestimated the Republican strength in several Senate races, as well as the governor's race in Wisconsin. Conversely, in 2012, the Gallup Poll showed Mitt Romney beating Barack Obama in the presidential election."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"

The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.

25 years later: Cincinnati and Mapplethorpe

Cincinnati writer/artist Grace Dobush has a well-researched and well-written story in today's Washington Post about this weekend's activity at the Contemporary Arts Center celebrating the 25th anniversary of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's infamous Perfect Moment exhibition at the CAC. Events and the symposium continue through tomorrow; see the full schedule here.

Dobush does a nice job reminding readers of the local tumult in 1990, centering around the prosecution of the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and their subsequent acquittal by a Hamilton County jury. She also discusses Cincinnati's slow recovery from the culture wars that created an atmosphere where art could be prosecuted as obscenity.

"When Chris Seelbach became Cincinnati’s first openly gay City Council member in 2011 ... Cincinnati’s score on the Human Rights Council’s Municipal Equality Index, which evaluates cities on support for LGBT populations, was 68," Dobush writes. "As of 2014, it was a perfect 100. And Cincinnati son Jim Obergefell was at the center of the landmark Supreme Court decision this year to legalize gay marriage."

Interviews include Seelbach, CAC Director Raphaela Platow, Source Cincinnati's Julie Calvert, former Mercantile Library Director Albert Pyle and Vice Mayor David Mann. Great job, Grace!

Read the full Washington Post story here.

Ohio political parties want to limit their own power in redistricting

Governing Magazine has a good roundup story about Ohio Issue 1, which we'll be voting on in a few weeks. If passed, it would change how Ohio legislators draw state senate and state rep districts every 10 years in accord with the U.S. Census.

"Ohio politicians have long talked about changing the redistricting process, but, if approved, this would be the first major change to it in more than 40 years, according to Brittany Warner, communications director for the Ohio Republican Party," writes Daniel Vock. "The 66 members of the state's Republican central committee 'found the plan to be transparent, accountable and fair, so they endorsed the issue,' she said.

"Democrats are on board, too — although the chair of the state party, David Pepper, said they would prefer an independent redistricting commission like the ones in Arizona and California. But voters soundly defeated a proposal to do that in 2012.

"'If you're going to have it be the politicians doing redistricting, which is less than ideal, I think it provides a structure that pretty creatively incentivizes doing it the right way,' Pepper said."

Pepper also told Vock, "The direct result of gerrymandering is non-stop, very far right, extreme legislating. Hopefully the outcome of fair districts is a much more measured approach by our state legislature."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"

Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.

Considering Ohio's new ethics strategy of publicly shaming politicians

Governing Magazine, which covers politics, policy and management for state and local government leaders, looks at recent actions by State Auditor Dave Yost to shine public attention on unethical behavior by government officials across Ohio.

"When it comes to public ethics, things aren't always black or white," writes Data Editor Mike Maciag in the September issue. "There are plenty of actions that might not be illegal, but nonetheless would be seen by most people as an abuse of power.

"In Ohio, such occurrences ultimately went unflagged in audit reports. But State Auditor Dave Yost wants to change that. In July, he implemented a new policy allowing for findings of 'abuse' that are meant to draw attention to highly questionable behavior by public officials not directly contradicting state rules or laws."

Officials found to have committed abuses won't necessarily face penalties in a courtroom, Yost says, but they'll be subject to the court of public opinion and the possibility of public shaming will act as a deterrent.

Let's hope he's right.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

How a fiddler and an astrophysicist introduced predictive analytics to Cincinnati

Backchannel, a tech-focused subsite at Medium.com, is back at it, heaping praise on the city of Cincinnati's efforts to lead the charge toward the future of local government by integrating data into its daily operations. The praise is centered on Ed Cunningham, head of the city's building code enforcement operations who also happens to be front man and fiddle player for Comet Bluegrass All-Stars.

Back in April, Backchannel writer Susan Crawford used glowing terms to describe how City Manager Harry Black and Chief Performance Officer Chad Kenney built the city's Office of Performance and Data Analytics. With this new story she revisits Cincinnati's newfound fascination with data, focusing on Cunningham's experiments with Predictive Blight Prevention.

"Even if you aren’t immediately eager to read another column about Cincinnati, keep going," Crawford writes. "Like other good stories, this one has drama, memorable characters, sudden bursts of insight, and a cliffhanger ending that hints at future episodes. It also has a soundtrack."

Read the full Backchannel article here.

New York Times tracks split over Boehner's resignation to Cincinnati area

In the wake of U.S. House Speaker John Boehner's resignation last week, The New York Times interviews a variety of Southwest Ohio residents in his district and finds a mix of opinion. The headline says it all: "Reactions on Boehner's Home Turf Reflect Divisions in G.O.P."

Reporter Julie Bosman visited Andy's Cafe, the Carthage spot once owned by Boehner's father, and various West Chester locations to solicit opinions.

Read the full New York Times story here.

How Hamilton produced "drill rap" star Slim Jesus

Apparently Hamilton is home to an up-and-coming rap star who goes by the name Slim Jesus. The Atlantic's CityLab attempts to find out why a white rapper from small-town Ohio has a video with more than 1.5 million YouTube views (image from the video is above) and close to 16,500 "thumbs-up" as well as more than 7,000 "thumbs-down."

"His song 'Drill Time' has launched him into overnight celebrity status, in no small part to his gunshow spectacle, but also because of the power of social media," Brentin Mock writes. "There are plenty of blogs, listicles, and Reddit threads attempting to explain who Slim Jesus is. However, his hometown of Hamilton — the city where (President George W.) Bush dropped bombs on education and Iraq in the same speech (in 2002) — perhaps most deserves examination to understand how Slim Jesus came to be."

Among "the conditions that created Slim Jesus," Mock focuses on Ohio's vanishing manufacturing sector, which hit Hamilton especially hard, and the state's steady pro-firearms legislative march.

"While gun violence is often associated with black teens, it's not surprising to find such a huge arsenal of guns in the hands of the white, teenaged rapper," he writes. "He's a reflection of his city — which is 84 percent white and 22.9 percent poor — and a reflection of the values of the predominantly white National Rifle Association. Along with Slim Jesus, Ohio also produced Machine Gun Kelly, from Cleveland, a Rust Belt city that has recovered a bit better than Hamilton but is still in an economic rut."

Read the full CityLab story here.

Oyler School's role in transforming Lower Price Hill praised by national education leader

"Imagine an old, abandoned end unit row house that is tall, slender in build, and neglected in infrastructure," writes Martin J. Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, in The Huffington Post's education blog. "For many years it's been a crack house, filled with needles — a revolving door of drugs and criminal activity. The back of this house overlooks a local schoolyard, where neighborhood children and youth come to learn and play. The house stands in contrast to a beautiful rebuilt school and is a reminder of the challenges students, educators, families, and the community face daily."

Blank then describes how the house offered an opportunity to be part of the amazing transformation of Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati thanks to the reconstruction of Oyler Community Learning Center.

Titled "What Happens When a Crack House Becomes an Early Childhood Learning Center?" the blog post describes how Oyler leaders helped renovate the house to become a neighborhood pre-school center.

The Robert & Adele Schiff Early Learning Center opened late last year, expanding a program that Oyler began by housing it inside the school.

Public radio education reporter Amy Scott premiered her documentary film about the same Lower Price Hill experiment, Oyler, in May at the school. It's screening Thursday night at the 2015 Cincinnati Film Festival.

Read the full Huffington Post column here.

U.S. News ranks Ohio State as top area college, followed by IU and Miami

U.S. News & World Report is out with its latest college rankings, which the magazine suggests "provide an excellent starting point ... for families concerned with finding the best academic value for their money."

After the listings intro states, "The host of intangibles that makes up the college experience can't be measured by a series of data points," USN&WR does just that. And how do the data points add up for area schools?

In the "National Universities" category, Ohio State is the first area school at #52. Other area institutions include Indiana University at 75, Miami University 82, University of Dayton 108, University of Kentucky 129, Ohio University 135 and University of Cincinnati 140.

In the "Regional Universities" category, the Midwest features Xavier at #6 and Mount St. Joseph at 68. The South includes Thomas More at 53 and NKU 80.

In the "National Liberal Arts Colleges" category, the region's highest ranked school is Oberlin at 23, followed by Kenyon 25, Centre 45, Denison 55, Earlham 61 and Berea 67.

Forbes magazine released its own college rankings last month, with Miami, Indiana and Ohio State as the highest rated area schools as well, but in that order.

See the full U.S. News & World Report rankings here.

NKY's Judge David Bunning "has guts," Washington Post reports

The Washington Post is among the national media covering the drama in a federal courthouse in Ashland, Ky., where Judge David Bunning jailed Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for her refusal to issue marriage licenses in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling legalizing same-sex marriage.

Bunning is a Ft. Thomas resident, graduate of Newport Central Catholic High School and son of former U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning. This case has thrust him into the national media glare.

"After hearing both sides inside a federal courtroom in Ashland, Ky., the 49-year-old judge made his decision: The devout Catholic and son of former U.S. senator and Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Bunning became the first U.S. judge to issue a jail sentence to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling that made gay marriage legal across the country," The Post explains in a profile story published this morning.

"Bunning's decision Thursday came at a pivotal juncture in the gay marriage debate that has divided the country along starkly partisan lines. But notably, it has been the decisions of a Republican judge appointed by a Republican president, George W. Bush, in a conservative state that have halted the latest effort to use religious freedom objections to the ruling."

Read the full Washington Post story here.

Cincinnati Public Library improves to fifth busiest in U.S.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County checked out more than 18 million items in 2014, making it the fifth busiest public library system in the U.S., according to a new Public Library Data Service statistical report. In last year’s report (2013 usage data), the Library was the sixth busiest library in the U.S.

The 2015 report is based on survey responses collected from more than 1,800 public libraries in the U.S. and Canada for fiscal year 2014. It's published each year by the Public Library Association, the largest division of the American Library Association.

Read the full Cincinnati Business Courier story here.
526 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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