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Talent : Cincinnati In The News

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Want a bike-friendly city? Get ready to fail until it works, says Wired


Here's a fascinating article from Wired about building a bike-friendly culture in cities. Although it doesn't specifically mention Cincinnati, its findings and recommendations definitely apply to us.

"Building any infrastructure, anywhere, is a pain in the neck," writes Aarian Marshall. "You've got to find exactly the right government agencies, community groups, funding sources and contractors. And then you've got to figure out the logistics of construction and worry about the inevitable delays and cost overruns."

But Marshall then says not to despair, that there's good news for our soon-to-be bicycling-loving cities. "Across the country, usually stodgy governments are trying quick and dirty pilot projects, putting down cheap and temporary bicycle infrastructure and giving it a literal test drive (well, ride) before committing to the big stuff."

Like bike-only lanes along Central Parkway?

"Laying down temporary infrastructure before ginning up anything permanent also provides an opportunity to convince skeptics about the upsides of bike travel," Marshall writes. "Demonstration projects go a long way in terms of alleviating fears. Once residents see bicycle infrastructure in action, he says, they (usually) decide it doesn’t take up too much room or cost too much money. That makes it politically easier to build permanent protected lanes, bike boxes and signals."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

20 years later, John Harkes is part of another soccer beginning


Washington Post soccer reporter Steven Goff interviewed FC Cincinnati head coach John Harkes after the local team won its home opener April 9, recalling another Harkes debut 20 years earlier.

"In April 1996, John Harkes stood at midfield before an inaugural soccer match at San Jose's Spartan Stadium, the captain of a new team in a new nationwide league featuring U.S. World Cup players who could finally earn a proper paycheck at home," Goff writes. "Twenty years and three days later, Harkes was again part of something fresh in American soccer, pacing the sideline on a cold Saturday night in Cincinnati as coach of an expansion club making its home debut in the prosperous third flight. D.C. United and MLS then, FC Cincinnati and USL now."

Goff remarks on FC Cincinnati's amazing support from 14,658 fans on a cold night, saying the Nippert Stadium crowd "was larger than MLS matches in Washington and Dallas and considerably bigger than all five games in the second-division North American Soccer League."

FC Cincinnati plays its second home match April 16 against Louisville. Read Soapbox's February interview with FC Cincinnati President Jeff Berding here.

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

Cincinnati's never-used subway is 100 years old this month


"In 1916, the people of Cincinnati voted to fund the construction of a subway that would revolutionize the city’s public transportation system," Scott Rodd writes at the Next City website. "One hundred years later, all that remains is a 2-mile stretch of abandoned tunnels below the declining Rust Belt city."

Rodd goes on to relate the fascinating story of how Cincinnati approved $6 million in bonds to build a subway "loop" centered in downtown only to have a subsequent mayor halt the project mid-stream, leaving abandoned tunnels and tracks under Central Parkway to this day. Foreshadowing, perhaps, for the Cincinnati Streetcar loop, which was almost halted a few years ago by newly-elected Mayor John Cranley? Instead, the streetcar starts public operations later this year.

(Note to Rodd: Cincinnati is a "declining Rust Belt city?" Dude, you need to get a clue from national reports like this, this and this of Cincinnati's renaissance and rejuvenation ...and those are from just the past week.)

The Ohio Department of Transportation eventually built large portions of Interstates 71 and 75 in urban Cincinnati on land the state had originally purchased for the subway loop, saving money by avoiding right-of-way acquisitions and eminent domain but forever destroying rail transit routes.

Read the full Next City story here.
 

Contemporary Arts Center was one of Zaha Hadid's most striking designs, says New York Times


The New York Times offers a tribute to architect Zaha Hadid, who died March 31 at age 65, by highlighting her seven most striking designs, including the Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts downtown.

The former Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp, one of Hadid’s great champions, famously wrote of the new CAC facility in 2003: "Might as well blurt it out: The Rosenthal Center is the most important American building to be completed since the end of the Cold War."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

KPMG study shows Cincinnati as most cost-friendly business location among large U.S. cities


Cincinnati is the most cost-friendly city to do business among the 31 largest U.S. metro areas, according to the recently released 2016 Competitive Alternatives study by audit, tax and advisory firm KPMG.

Favorable leasing costs and low property taxes contributed to Cincinnati's first place ranking in the study, which compares 26 key cost components in each market — including costs associated with taxes, labor, facilities, transportation and utilities — as they apply to seven different business-to-business service sector operations and 12 different manufacturing sector operations.

"Many factors go into site selection decisions, and a study such as ours helps businesses, city leaders and economic development teams begin to consider investments that should ultimately be good for the community and good for business," says Ulrich Schmidt, a managing director in KPMG's Global Location and Expansion Services practice, which helps companies that are expanding, relocating or consolidating their facilities.

Read the full KPMG report here.
 

Forbes rates Cincinnati as #15 best U.S. city for recent college grads


College graduates today face better job prospects than those from a few years ago but are typically saddled by student loan debt, Forbes magazine writes, so "they would be wise to consider carefully where to start their careers."

To find out which cities offer the best overall prospects for college-educated workers with five years of experience or less, Forbes has crunched data on job growth, unemployment rates, pay and cost of living in America’s largest 100 metro areas. Its resulting 2016 list of the 20 Best Cities for Young Professionals includes Cincinnati at #15.

The top cities, according to Forbes, are either job-heavy economic powerhouses where the pay is high and the cost of living is too (places like San Francisco at #1 and Silicon Valley at #2) or underrated mid-tier markets where the pay is still decent but the cost of living is a relative bargain.

According to the numbers, Cincinnati's median salary for college grads with 0-5 years experience is $50,800; the population with bachelor's degree is 31.44%; the average yearly job growth (2015-2017) is 1.96%; and the cost of living is 8.17% below the national average.

Two regional cities finished ahead of Cincinnati — Columbus at #7 and Indianapolis at #10.

Read the full Forbes list and methodology here.
 

Chefs around the country share why wood-fire cooking sparks their creativity


Just a few years ago, Kat Kinsman writes on the Tasting Table website, the dining world was poised to drown in a gurgle of futuristic gels, spheres and foams far removed from the sensory experiences most people might associate with food. That disconnect might factor into 80 percent of the 2016 semifinalists for the James Beard Best New Restaurant award featuring dishes containing the words "wood-grilled," "smoked" and "ember" on their current menus.

"Wood-fire cooking is roaring back in a big way," Kinsman says, "and chefs from coast to coast are using this ancient technique to spark some creative thinking in their kitchens."

One of the leading wood-fire experts she profiles is Jared Bennett, executive chef of Metropole in the 21c Museum Hotel downtown who "wants diners to really feel — and taste — the burn."

The article goes on to explore Bennett's menu at length, delighting in his mix of modern techniques "with ripping-hot wood-fired heat to distinctive effect."

Tasting Table describes itself as "a website and newsletter for culinary enthusiasts." Read the full story here.
 

How the smart cities like Cincinnati use Internet of Things to attract young, skilled workforce


Social media expert and management professor Beverly Macy writes in Huffington Post about the coming connectivity explosion through embrace of the Internet of Things, saying there will be 24 billion IoT devices installed globally by 2020 and $6 trillion invested in IoT solutions over the next five years.

As the "great digital transformation of 2016" proceeds in both the private and public sectors around the globe, Macy says, we'll all be affected by the digital innovation in more ways than one.

She says the nation's "smart cities" are attracting a youthful and highly skilled workforce with "livability and connectedness" as key selling points, using Cincinnati as a prime example. As part of the White House’s TechHire Initiative, Cincinnati is looking to retrain displaced workers as application developers who could be hired on in IoT startups popping up or by companies like local manufacturer Mazak Corp.

Read the full Huffington Post story here.
 

UC/Louisville split shows how football's power lurks behind the men's basketball tournament


As the NCAA men's basketball tournament officially opens today, The New York Times delves into the widening revenue/spending chasm between the “Power 5” football conferences and everyone else in Division I. The conclusion: even though UC and UConn remain competitive in the American Athletic Conference and Xavier and Villanova remain high-profile in the basketball-only Big East, the split between college sports' haves and have-nots threatens to destroy the basketball tournament's appeal.

The Times says “an instructive, if imperfect, analogy” of the widening split is illustrated by the University of Cincinnati and the University of Louisville, only 100 miles apart.

“Each has a respected basketball pedigree, and both are former members of the Big East,” Marc Tracy writes. “But when the old Big East broke apart a few years ago, scattering members into new leagues, Cincinnati landed in the American, and its budget indicated that it planned to spend a hair over $6 million on men’s basketball last year. By contrast, Louisville, seen by Southern football powers as an enviable rival, landed in the A.C.C., and it spent more than $12 million on men’s basketball in 2014, the last year for which figures are available.”

“I don’t see how all of that revenue they get for football is neutral for basketball,” Commissioner Amy Huchthausen of the America East Conference is quoted as saying. “It doesn’t all get spent on football. It gets spent on the whole athletics program.”

UC and Xavier both open NCAA Tournament play tomorrow night.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Many Ohio cities, including Cincinnati, aren't feeling Gov. Kasich's "miracle"


Ohio Gov. John Kasich is banking on winning tomorrow's Republican Party primary to keep his presidential campaign alive. He's been running radio and TV ads running across the state and elsewhere claiming “Ohio is booming again, and you know he could do the same for America.”

Kasich has repeatedly called Ohio “one of the fastest growing states in the country” and dubbed the transformation the “Ohio Miracle,” holding the state up as a model for Rust Belt recession recovery. But there's one problem with that message, Next City reports.

“According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Ohio has now gone 38 straight months with job growth below the national average,” Daniel McGraw writes. “And a recent report from the entrepreneur-driven Economic Innovation Group ranked three Ohio cities — Cleveland, Cincinnati and Toledo — in the top 10 of the 'most distressed cities' in America.”

McGraw says the divergence of Kasich's campaign claims vs. the reality of Ohio's urban distress begs the questions economists have long held: Do governors have much impact over their state economies, and should they get credit or blame?

Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

Read the full Next City story here.
 

Cincinnati lags behind other Midwestern cities for immigrants establishing roots


Coastal cities such as Los Angeles, Miami and New York have long been viewed as the gateways for immigrants starting new lives in America, Governing Magazine says, but the best immigrant-friendly strategies these days are to be found in the Midwest.

“Places like Indianapolis and Columbus and Dayton, Ohio, have pursued a wide range of immigrant-friendly strategies, in part to prop up vulnerable economies and stem population losses,” Mike Maciag writes. “Other Rust Belt jurisdictions are joining them.” Cincinnati is not among the top destinations for immigrants, according to the magazine's analysis of U.S. Census data.

“The Midwest is becoming the new gateway,” Guadalupe Velasquez, who coordinates the New American Initiative for the city of Columbus, tells Governing.

Governing compared Census data collected between 2005-2009 with data from 2010-2014 for all cities with populations of at least 100,000. Maciag's story accompanying the data highlights five cities with the best immigrant initiatives: Columbus, Dayton, Detroit, Louisville and Baltimore.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati one of America's 10 best new cities for beer lovers


Fortune Magazine has a new feature story about the top 10 U.S. cities with great under-the-radar craft beer scenes, including Cincinnati.

"Other cities are starting to build strong reputations of their own," the story says after citing San Diego, Denver, Portland and San Francisco as national craft beer powerhouses. "To avoid any regional bias, we spoke to people throughout the beer industry — from brewers to hop farmers — to get their take on areas that are showing a lot of potential, though may still be under-the-radar on a national basis."

The craft brewery industry has exploded across Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the story says, and mentions two breweries with large expansions: Rhinegeist in Over-the-Rhine and MadTree, which is preparing to build an $18 million brewery and taproom in Oakley.

Read the full Fortune story here.
 

8 best places to try Cincinnati's "remarkable chili"


The Daily Meal website returns to one of the national media's favorite regional food topics, Cincinnati chili, with a guide to eight key places in Southwest Ohio to try the crazy concoction. The writer makes a point to say he excluded Northern Kentucky spots on purpose, perhaps setting the stage for a future story.

"Even people who have never set foot in Cincinnati know that the city is crazy for chili," Matt Sulem writes. "However, locals will tell you that the only insane thing about chili is how good it is at the source. Not to mention instances when people dare to eat it the wrong way."

You'll have to find out all eight locations on your own, but Sulem offers a nice mix of the obvious (Skyline, Gold Star, Camp Washington) and small neighborhood chili parlors.

The Daily Meal, published by New York-based Spanfeller Media Group, "delivers a fresh take on dining news and trends and helps you succeed in the kitchen while highlighting the unifying aspects of food and drink and celebrating the people who create them."

See the Daily Meal Cincinnati chili slideshow here.
 

How "Carol" helped bring Hollywood to Cincinnati


"We hear a lot these days about the revival of many of once-great American cities, from the Rust Belt of Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and all the way down to Houston," John Oseid writes in the Forbes lifestyle section. "Everyone's got their own list, but most anyone's should include Cincinnati."

Oseid (author bio: "I cover the world of travel with gusto ... literally, the world") says the film industry has helped put Cincinnati on the path to revival.

"Carol director Todd Haynes is known, per The New York Times, for his meticulous period recreations, and recognized that Cincinnati was a goldmine of locations," he writes, mentioning a litany of other films that were shot in the area recently: Don Cheadle's "highly-anticipated" Miles Ahead, Marauders starring Bruce Willis and Christopher Meloni, hometown actress Royalty Hightower's breakout role in The Fits, James Franco's Goat and Mickey Rourke's boxing movie Tiger.

Forbes references a University of Cincinnati study saying this cinematic activity amounted to 8,880 local jobs created and $54 million in direct spending over the last two years alone. Oseid ends his story with this tip: "Should you wish to shoot your next movie in Hollywood on the Ohio, the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Film Commission is waiting for your call."

Read the full Forbes story here.
 
556 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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