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Talent : Cincinnati In The News

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Two local startup accelerators place among 30 best in national study


Two local startup accelerators were recently ranked among the best in the nation by Seed Rankings.

Over-the-Rhine's The Brandery was placed in the Silver category and Covington-based UpTech in the Bronze category. 

Seed Rankings looked at a number of data points, including Qualified Fundraising, Survival, Founder Satisfaction (which was obtained from a survey of entrepreneurs who have graduated from the pool of 150 accelerator programs) and Alumni Network.

The ranking provides information for entrepreneurs who are looking to join an accelerator and are in search of more information, including total dollars funded and the success rate of the accelerators.

Other startups that made the top 30 include Denver-based Techstars (Platinum), California's 500 Startups (Gold) and the nonprofit Lighthouse Labs (Bronze).

People's Liberty continues to make waves


People's Liberty is at the halfway point of its five-year mission. To date, it's funded 50 Cincinnatians to bring innovative ideas to the city — and it still has 50 more projects to fund.

PL has two rounds of applications a year; once projects are chosen, grants are given in three categories: $10,000 art installation grants, $15,000 storefront grants (the grantee sets up shop for six weeks in the Dept. of Doing, PL's first-floor retail space) and two $100,000 Haile Fellowships.

The philanthropic foundation's goal is to fund creative projects that lead to social engagement or change.

Read more about PL in this article from Forbes.
 

Cincinnati again tops the list of best places for college grads


For the second year in a row, Cincinnati is the best place for college graduates. There are endless job opportunities and room for growth, and the Queen City has the lowest average rent ($555) of any of the top 25 cities on this list. The cost of living here is about 3.5 percent lower than the national average too.

Smart Asset, a personal finance website, looked at 108 of the largest cities in the U.S. and examined data points that make the city suitable for a recent college graduate.
  • Jobs: The unemployment rate among those with bachelor’s degrees, the overall unemployment rate, earnings for college grads and the number of Indeed job listings.
  • Affordability: The median rent in each city and the cost of living as a percentage of the national average.
  • Fun: The concentration of entertainment and dining, the percentage of the population ages 20-29 and the Yelp scores of restaurants and bars.
To see the full ranking and find out more about Cincinnati's statistics, click here.
 

Star Wars costume exhibit considered must-see of the summer


There's been a ton of local hype around Star Wars and the Power of Costume — and now it's drawing some national attention from Cheapism.com's blog. It was recently included in the site's list of 20 must-see exhibits of the summer.

Visitors to the Cincinnati Museum Center (yes, parts of Union Terminal are open during renovations) get an up-close-and-personal look at over 60 costumes that were used in Star Wars movies. Exhibit highlights include robes worn by Obi-Wan Kenobi and Luke Skywalker, Darth Vader's suit and breathing mask and Stormtrooper uniforms. 

The exhibit is on display now through Oct. 1; tickets are $24 for adults, $21 for seniors and $16 for kids ages 3-12. Click here for more information.

 

Queen City tops list of 25 best cities for people under the age of 35


There are many reasons why Cincinnati attracts young professionals: locally owned and operated restaurants, great beer, rich history, affordable housing and a strong job market. According to CNBC, these are just a few of the reasons why the city made it on Growella's list of top 25 cities for people under the age of 35.

Cincinnati came in at no. 16, just ahead of St. Louis.

Cincinnati received an A-, and is considered a great place for millenials because it has the ninth strongest paycheck 17 percent more job openings than the average city.

To decide the top 25 cities, Growella, which is based right here in Cincinnati, looked at these criteria: 
  1. How many entry-level jobs are available in the city? (7.5 percent of score)
  2. How much time is spent commuting in the city? (7.5 percent of score)
  3. What's the public transportation situation like in the city? (10 percent of score)
  4. How many other young people live there? (15 percent of score)
  5. What's the after-work and weekend scene like in the city? (10 percent of score)
  6. How far does a paycheck get you in the city? (50 percent of score)
Cities that scored 90+ received an A.

Check out the other 24 cities.

 

Cincinnati State designs Ohio's first-ever degree in beer brewing science


Two years ago, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College began offering craft beer classes. It expanded the curriculum in 2016, and is now offering a two-year Associate of Applied Science in Brewing degree.

Cincinnati State is the first school in Ohio to offer a degree in beer brewing science.

The program is designed to help students find jobs as head or assistant brewers. The majority of brewers are self-taught home brewers who have a passion for craft beer — they then take the leap and open their own breweries. Much of the coursework is based off of information from local brewers.

One of the classes teams up with a local brewery to create a class beer, which is then brewed by the participating brewery and tapped for the class to try.

Check out the full story from U.S. News & World Report.

Lisnr developed a data-over-audio tech that has widespread applications


Founded in 2012, local startup Lisnr developed a data-over-audio technology in 2014 that could replace Bluetooth, NCR and QR code scanning.

Smart Tone doesn't need an internet connection to work, but the speakers that are "talking" to each other have to be in close proximity to one another. Lisnr's co-founder and CEO Rodney Williams says that his program has a lot of practical implications — Smart Tone was beta tested by ticketing companies, airlines, transportation companies, theaters, retailers, banks, mobile wallet providers, real estate companies and security firms.

Jaguar/Land Rover is now using it to personalize car settings by "talking" to the driver's smartphone. Lisnr also just landed the world's largest ticketing company as a customer, and Smart Tone has gone live in several locations around the globe. 

Lisnr isn't a one-trick pony: Locally, it has teamed up with the Contemporary Arts Center for an interactive museum experience that runs through June 18.

To read more about Smart Tone and Lisnr, click here.

International movie filmed locally at center stage at Cannes Film Festival


"The Killing of a Sacred Deer," which was filmed in Cincinnati last year and stars Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman, is being screened at the Cannes Film Festival this week.

The film is in the running for the festival's most prestigious award, the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm), along with 19 other films.

Cannes began on May 15 and runs until May 28; "The Killing of a Sacred Deer" will be screened on May 22 at the festival. Its anticipated international release date is November.

Read more about the Cannes Film Festival.

Cincinnati ranks in the top 150 best large cities to start a business


Cincinnati is known for its startup scene and constant flow of new, small business openings. But how does it rank when stacked up against other large U.S. cities?

WalletHub recently conducted a study that looked at 18 key metrics, ranging from five-year business survival rates to office-space affordability in 150 of the country's largest cities.

Cincinnati came in at no. 105 overall, and no. 126 in Business Environment, no. 56 in Access to Resources and no. 53 in Business Cost.

And when comparing Best Cities vs. Worst Cities in the category Lowest Availability of Human Capital, Cincinnati came in at no. 148.

To read more about how WalletHub determined its findings, click here.

Cintrifuse serves as model to spur Pittsburgh business collaboration


Pittsburgh-based business professional Kit Needham relied on advice from Cintrifuse's Eric Weismann in creating an awards ceremony to encourage interaction between corporations and startups.

The ceremony took place last week and honored Giant Eagle grocers for its utilization of human resource and management apps created by Pittsburgh startups.

“Even though we may not want to admit it during football season, we’re fighting the same fight,” Weissman says of the burgeoning Cincinnati-Pittsburgh entrepreneurial connection.

Needham took a cue from a Cintrifuse model that has influenced at least $97.6 million in investment, all through the creation of a syndicate “fund of funds” containing approximately $57 million. This syndicate fund invests in other pools around the U.S., which then invest in Cincinnati startups. 

Click here to read the full Pittsburgh Gazette story.

People's Liberty grantees featured on national podcast


This week's episode of the popular Plural of You podcast featured two local People's Liberty grantees and authors of The Neighborhood Playbook.

The podcast described Joe Nikol and Kevin Wright as two Cincinnati-based planners who "wrote a field manual...to guide developers and residents alike toward a common development model, which they divided into five steps or 'plays.'”

"What I’ve learned from Kevin and Joe is that community development doesn’t have to be this enormous, out-of-reach process that we sometimes imagine it to be," says the podcast host. "There are certainly caveats, and we have to be willing to let go of our own ideas and compromise sometimes to see them grow. At least we have the steps now to get out and start something new."

Click here for the full-length Plural of You episode.

 

Cincinnati is one of the world's most competitive cities


Cincinnati is growing at a rapid rate, and not just in the number of breweries that call the city home. Site Selection Magazine released its report on the World's Most Competitive Cities, and the Queen City finished in the top five of all North American cities in seven of the nine categories. 

Cincinnati ranked no. 3 in electronics and food and beverage; no. 4 in both automotive and chemicals and plastics; and no. 5 in aerospace, business and financial services, and machinery, equipment and construction.

These rankings mean that the Greater Cincinnati market is highly competitive when it comes to bringing new businesses and companies to town. 

To see where other world cities finished, click here.

 

Queen City is the third best city for young professionals


According to technology company Move Buddha, Cincinnati is the third best city for young professionals.

Move Buddha looked at several factors when evaluating cities, including the average cost of rent for a one-bedroom apartment, the number of bars per square mile, the percentage of the population between the ages of 20-30, the average age of residents and the unemployment rate.

Here are the statistics for Cincinnati:
  • Average rent: $630 (one-bedroom)
  • Bars per square mile: 12
  • Percent of population ages 20-30: 19%
  • Average age: 32.7
  • Unemployment rate: 4.1%
Are you a YP looking for a new city? Check out the full list here.

How can smart cities make money for the community?


Jon Salisbury, co-founder of Nexigen and creator of the smartLINK network, is one of the driving forces behind making Greater Cincinnati the first "smart" region in the country.

In this video from TechRepublic, Salisbury talks about how smart cities can create revenue and become self-sustaining based on looking for projects that add value, cut costs or create profit.

Salisbury gives examples like linkNYC, another kiosk company, that was able to sustain itself because of money being dumped into it but that he says is an ultimate failure because the city couldn't support it. However, linkNYC has been a learning experience for all involved.

On the other hand, Copenhagen has a smart city data exchange that works like the stock market, where data is put out there and customers can purchase that data. The companies selling the data receives a cut, and the city of Copenhagen gets a portion of that as well and has become self-sustaining.

 

Cladwell helps consumers buy less and work with what they already own

Cladwell, a locally designed clothing app, aims to help its users create a capsule wardrobe out of timeless pieces, rather than investing in fast-fashion. The app doesn't encourage users to go out and buy something new, but to make new outfits of pieces they already own.

To read more about other startups that are helping consumers buy less and utilize their closets in new ways, click here.

 
615 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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