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Talent : Cincinnati In The News

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Queen City job market ranked eighth best


When people relocate for a job, they tend to gravitate toward millennial hotspots like New York and San Francisco. But if you’re looking for a change of scenery, a midsize city with working-class roots may be the best option.

New data from Glassdoor reveals the 25 best U.S. metro areas for jobs, based on affordability, job openings and job satisfaction. Pittsburgh, Indianapolis and Kansas City topped the list, with Cincinnati coming in at no. 8.

The top three cities, all rapidly-evolving destinations for tech talent, have over 80,000 job openings each, and a cost of living that puts big cities to shame. Other Midwestern cities on the list, like Minneapolis and Detroit, have well over 100,000 openings a piece.

Cincinnati has about 80,000 job openings with a median base salary of just over $44,000. Job satisfaction rating is 3.3, and the median home value is $152,600.

Click here to see the complete stats from the top 25 best U.S. metro areas for jobs.
 


Rhinegeist's Dad makes best winter beers list


Winter isn't just about eating too much food and spending time with family — it's also a time when breweries step up their game with winter warmer beers. These beers are typically Scotch ales or ambers, and feature pie spieces like cinnamon, nutmeg and cardamom. USA Today rounded up 28 of the country's best winter beers, and it's no surprise that Rhinegeist's Dad made the list.

Dad is a flannel-inspired beer, and is a nod to Rhinegeist's founder’s own flannel-wearing father, complete with notes of pine, citrus and caramel. 

Dad joines other mouth-watering beers from around the U.S., including Bourbon Barrel Aged Gingerbread Imperial Stout from Moody Tongue Brewing in Chicago, Three Cranes from Mystic Brewery in Massachusetts and an EggNog IPA from Evil Twin Brewing in Brooklyn.

See the full list here.
 

MORTAR helps local entrepreneurs overcome business obstacles, one step at a time


MORTAR co-founders Derrick Braziel, William Thomas II and Allen Woods saw the need to provide resources for underrepresented entrepreneurs. 

Together, they help entrepreneurs from diverse backgrounds build a business plan, launch their business, gain access to customers and funding and connect with other entrepreneurs and mentors. 

Watch this video from Forbes to learn more.
 

Two Cincinnati groups get GRAMMY nods


Tune into the 60th annual GRAMMY Awards on Jan. 28th to see if two Cincinnati groups receive a coveted award in their category.
 

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, led by conductor Louis Langrée, received a nomination for Best Orchestral Performance for the album "Concertos for Orchestra."  

Composer Zhou Tian (pronounced Jo-Tyen) also earned a spot in the Best Contemporary Classical Composition category for that same album.
 
The CSO has been here before — it was previously nominated in the Best Orchestral Performance category but has not taken home that trophy. But they have won Grammys related to production and engineering, most recently for a 2008 release.

The National, a Brooklyn-based, Cincinnati-bred group, also received a nod for its latest release, "Sleep Well Beast" in the Best Alternative Music Album and Best Recording Package categories.

The National also received a nomination in the Best Alternative Music Album category for 2013's "Trouble Will Find Me."

See if your favorite artist is up for a GRAMMY here.
 


Two Cincinnati entrepreneurs named to Forbes 30 Under 30


Rithvik Venna and Michael Markesbery of Oros, a Cincinnati startup, were named to this year's Forbes 30 Under 30 list. They, along with 598 others, are considered among the brightest minds of 2017. 

In 2015, the two — who were still in college at Miami University at the time — successfully launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund their business venture. They raised about $600,000 to get Oros off the ground.

For about three years, Oros has been tinkering with and improving its garments, making them warmer, thinner, more comfortable and sleek, with an aerogel insulation foam they call SolarCore, which is inspired by NASA technology. Oros has a new line of high-tech jackets and cold-weather apparel, and this year, they've added fleeces and vests.

See the other 30 Under 30 members, or read more about Venna and Markesbery here.

 

BLINK not the only draw in Cincinnati


This October brought BLINK to the Queen City, a free, walkable, light and art festival that spanned from The Banks to Findlay Market and included 60 large-scale installations and projections. Over one million people attended, putting it on the radar of people all over the region, and the country.

While in town for BLINK, travel blog Cool Hunting uncovered a myriad of other can't-miss options in town, including the 21c, Findlay Market, the Contemporary Arts Center, the Cincinnati Arts Museum, the Lucky Cat Museum, Taft's Ale House, brewery tours in Over-the-Rhine, the American Sign Museum, Rhinegeist's new restaurant, Music Hall and drinks at Sundry and Vice.

Click here to read more about Cool Hunting's four days of Cincinnati discovery.


 


Cincinnati is the eighth best city to live in if you love beer


In honor of International Stout Day (Nov. 2), Zumper.com evaluated the cities with the best bang for your buck, when it comes to beer.

Rankings were based on the number of breweries and brewpubs per capita, the number of bars per capita, the number of medals won at the Great American Beer Festival since its founding in 1982, the median rent for a one-bedroom apartment, the state's beer tax and the average price for a pint of beer.

The results are in, and Cincinnati is the eighth best city in the U.S. to live in if you're an avid beer drinker. Local breweries have won 13 medals at GABF, and on average, beer is about $3.50 a pint. There are also 66 bars per capita, which gives residents a ton of options.

See the full ranking here.
 

Cincinnati, Hamilton lead the way for startup development


Cincinnati, Columbus and Hamilton have landed themselves on the list of the top 100 cities to start a business in the U.S., according to a new survey from the company How to Start an LLC.

The top five cities in which to launch a startup are New Braunfels, Texas; San Antonio; Jacksonville; Cincinnati; and Arlington, respectively. The states with the most highly-ranked cities are, in order of the amount of cities, California, Massachusetts, Arizona, Texas, Florida, Colorado and Ohio.

Columbus ranks no. 16 and Hamilton ranks no. 28 on the list.

Metrics that factored into the ranking included cost of living, unemployment, university data and the Kauffman Index of Startup Activity, which focuses on new business creation activity and people engaging in business startup activity.

To read more about the ranking and see the full list, click here.
 


Please Cincinnati jumping on pink trend


The color Millennial Pink is all over the place, from social media to food. It's a shade that restaurants are embracing, including Cincinnati's own Please.

Inside, customers can find locally made light-pink ceramic bowls, pink wine books and checkbooks and Please's Instagram-famous pink-flecked bathroom tile, which was handpainted by Chef Ryan Santos and his girlfriend, Jessie.

Check out other pink restaurant trends here.
 

Queen City ranked no. 16 for economic growth in country


Cincinnati's booming economic opportunities landed it among 50 cities that restaurant website Yelp is watching in its latest project.

The Queen City ranks no. 16 on Yelp’s list of 50 cities for economic opportunity as part of its new Local Economic Outlook program.

The project was launched to use Yelp’s high volume of data to help businesses succeed and enable policymakers to make effective change to boost their communities. To date, the website has about 135 million users, allowing for a large amount of data to be collected.

On top of the top 50 cities for economic opportunity, Yelp also compiled data on the top 50 most improved neighborhoods for economic opportunity and the 10 most improved business categories for economic opportunity. To see all of the reports, click here.
 


Local startup shoots for the stars in data analysis


Astronomer, a CincyTech seed fund company, is working to give data analysts some of their time back. The two-year-old local startup has already raised $5.5 million in funding from Silicon Valley accelerators AngelPad and 500 Startups, as well as venture capital firm Frontline Ventures.

The startup helps companies build automated data pipelines, which are programs that gather data from various sources and collect it in central databases for analysis. This means that data analysts can spend less time manually entering data into spreadsheets and more time finding trends within the data.

Astronomer's goal is to make data tasks easier for non-tech companies. Its platform comes in two tiers — the base tier simplifies the pipeline process to selecting source and destination applications from a list of built-in integrations. Pricing is structured simply, starting at free to use and gradually scaling with the number of data events per month.

Its software has sold well in the non-tech sector, and companies like Roadtrippers, Everything But The House and CVG are already customers.

Click here to read more about Astronomer in Forbes.

 

Beer is rebooting Cincinnati neighborhoods


"Beer is bringing back our neighborhoods." Mayor John Cranley, 2017 State of the City address

Food & Wine recently dived into this statement, and found that Cranley is right. According to numbers from the Brewers Association, which represents the interests of small and independent breweries nationwide, craft brewing contributed about $68 billion to the economy last year, and created nearly half a million jobs.

Cincinnati is currently home to over 40 breweries, and another 11 are in the works. It's evident that neighborhood breweries are helping boost the city's economy — brewery owners are renovating buildings, hiring local workers and boosting the local economy.

Food & Wine highlighted four breweries — Brink, Rhinegeist, Urban Artifact and Woodburn — that are doing all of the above.

Click here to read more about Cincinnati's booming brewconomy.
 

Cincy's food scene affordable, accessible and boozy


Cincinnati's great restaurants and strong foodie scene recently landed it on WalletHub's list of the best cities in America for foodies.

The study looked at more than 180 of the largest U.S. cities across 24 data points, including affordability and accessibility of high-quality restaurants, food festivals per capita and craft breweries and wineries per capita.

Cincy came in at no. 20 on the list, and is one of the more foodie-friendly cities in the country. Here's how Cincinnati's food scene ranked in a few categories:
 
  • Average beer and wine price: no. 29
  • Restaurants per capita: no. 24
  • Affordability and accessibility of highly rated restaurants: no. 32
  • Gourmet specialty food stores per capita: no. 12
  • Craft breweries and wineries per capita: no. 11
  • Coffee and tea shops per capita: no. 32
To see how other cities stacked up, click here.


 

BLINK: by the numbers


This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
 
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.
 

 


DAAP connection pays off for UCLA professor


Casey Reas, professor of design media arts at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, has roots in Cincinnati: he's a graduate of UC's DAAP. His DAAP connections have landed him work with The National, an alt-rock band. 

Reas met The National's bassist, Scott Devendorf, and singer Matt Berninger when they were all graphic design students at DAAP — he even played drums for them, once upon a time.

The National just released its seventh album, "Sleep Well Beast," and Reas helped create four music videos for songs on the album. He used an open-source programming language called Processing, which he helped co-create, to make the videos.

Along with music videos, Reas' work has been exhibited in art galleries and projected onto buildings all over the globe.

To read more about Reas' process for creating The National's music videos, click here.
 
650 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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