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Talent : Cincinnati In The News

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Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

New study says Cincinnati among best U.S. cities for prosperity and inclusion over past 5 years


A new Metro Monitor report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program ranks the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas by growth, prosperity and inclusion during the recovery from the recession. Greater Cincinnati is in the top 20 for both prosperity and inclusion while sitting in the middle of the pack for overall growth.

The Atlantic's CityLab urban issues website summarizes the report's findings and provides links to all the charts, graphs and data metrics. One key takeaway is that, when analyzing the number trends from 2009 to 2014, city growth didn't necessarily equal prosperity for all of its residents.

Besides charting growth — GMP, jobs and aggregate wages — the report analyzes how that growth translates to individual prosperity, based on productivity, average annual wages and average standard of living. It also looks as whether that growth and prosperity includes all people across income and race brackets.

Read the full CityLab story and access the Brookings Metro Monitor report here.
 

Caribbean cricket star trying to break into baseball, thanks to Reds coach


An interesting feature story in The New York Times discusses how West Indies cricket star Kieran Powell is pursuing a dream to play professional baseball, working with a number of instructors that include Reds hitting coordinator Ryan Jackson.

Jackson is one of several coaches to have worked with Powell during the player’s six-month quest to sign with a baseball team, the story says, and told the Times that Powell “has made tremendous strides in a short period of time” and that the 6-foot-2, 190-pound Powell, age 25, profiled as a potential center fielder and leadoff hitter with a swing that could produce gap-to-gap line drives.

No professional cricket players have ever played major league baseball, the story says, though it references two pitchers from cricket-loving India, Dinesh Patel and Rinku Singh, who were signed to minor league deals by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2009 (their story was depicted in the movie Million Dollar Arm). Patel is no longer in organized baseball; Singh is, but he hasn't gotten anywhere near the major leagues.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 

UPDATE: AT&T to launch "smart cities" push with forward-thinking regions


AT&T is announcing this week how it will work with cities to turn everyday objects like traffic lights and parking spots into tools to manage congestion and conserve energy. Re/Code — a tech news, reviews and analysis website from Vox Media — says the "smart cities" sector, which includes everything from revamping the energy grid to digitizing government processes, is estimated to be a $1.5 trillion market by 2020 and that AT&T is anxious to get become a leader in the field.

"We see this as a massive opportunity," AT&T Mobility CEO Glenn Lurie told the website.

Broadly defined, explains Re/Code, "a smart city uses technology to change how urban environments are designed and managed to reduce expenses and improve efficiency. Telecom companies are working with forward-thinking municipalities to make decisions based on data from sensors added to locations and objects throughout the city. Imagine your car alerting you to the location of an open parking spot based on data broadcast by the spaces themselves or not having to wait at red lights because the road knows you are the only car there."

UPDATE: AT&T has announced that its first three U.S. partner cities will be Atlanta, Chicago and Dallas. Maybe next time for Cincinnati?

Read the full Re/Code post here.
 

Top 10 new bike projects in North America in 2015


Despite slow and hard-won progress for bike advocates across North America, says Next City writer Josh Cohen, there were plenty of victories worth celebrating in 2015. He details 10 such inspiring projects, mostly new protected bike lanes and street intersections along with the new Tilikum Crossing Bridge in Portland, Ore.

Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

In 2015, Cohen writes, "North American cities took some important steps with new, high-quality, physically separated bike infrastructure — the kind that helps more people feel comfortable riding, which in turn encourages DOTs to build more infrastructure, which then gets more people riding, and so on."

Greater Cincinnati had a few biking wins in 2015, including still-protected bike lanes on Central Parkway and Red Bike's expansion into Northern Kentucky, and real progress on the Wasson Way and Oasis Line paths is expected this year.

Read the full Next City story here.
 

Fountain Square Christkindlmarkt among top 10 German-style Christmas markets in U.S.


USA Today recently published a roundup of popular Christmas markets in Germany, accompanied by a slideshow of the 10 best German-style holiday markets in the U.S., including the Cincideutsch market on Fountain Square.

"The Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt brings European holiday traditions to Cincinnati, an Ohio River city with a deep German heritage and a huge Oktoberfest," the slideshow says in describing the downtown weekend market.

The fourth annual Christkindlmarkt is run by Cincideutsch, a group of German-speaking residents in Cincinnati who enjoy celebrating their German heritage. The market vendors offer a variety of traditional holiday sweets and European baked goods, Glühwein (hot spiced wine) and other hot beverages, Christian Moerlein beer and handcrafted gifts and seasonal decorations. It's open 4-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 20.

See the full USA Today top 10 list here.
 

Cincinnati one of the fastest growing U.S. "creative class hotspots"


Richard Florida, who invented the "creative class" concept when writing about trends among young, educated and mobile workers, has a new article on The Atlantic's CityLab website comparing U.S. cities' concentrations of the creative class in 2014 vs. 2000. Thanks to the efforts of many people here, Greater Cincinnati has the fifth fastest growing population of creative class residents among the 50 largest metro areas.

Cincinnati's creative class grew by 21 percent between 2000 and 2014, placing it in heady company with Las Vegas, Indianapolis, Portland and Salt Lake City.

"While most studies equate talent with the share of adults who hold college degrees, the creative class gauges what workers actually do by identifying the occupations in which they're employed," Florida writes. "Since I first wrote about this class more than a decade ago, it has gained millions more members. Today it comprises roughly a third of the workforce and accounts for about half of all wages and salaries across the United States."

The top cities in 2014 for creative class residents as a share of overall population are still on the coasts: San Jose, Washington D.C., Boston, San Francisco and Hartford, Conn. But Florida is impressed that job growth associated with the creative class has made inroads in the Midwest.

"When all is said and done, the winners and losers of the creative class look much the same in 2014 as they did in 2000," he writes. "But it's heartening to see that some of the metros with the lowest creative class shares a decade and a half ago — Las Vegas, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Milwaukee — have made substantial gains. This bodes well for the future prosperity of these metros, demonstrating that substantial creative class growth can occur in places that once lagged pretty far behind."

Read the full CityLab story here.
 

Stop letting starchitects ruin college campuses, including UC, says Project for Public Spaces


The University of Cincinnati received national attention from The New York Times in September for its focus on "starchitecture" in building new facilities on campus — a series of striking structures designed by high-profile architects. The new buildings have helped raise UC's national profile but contribute greatly to its $1.1 billion debt load; still, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent over the past 10 years.

The Project for Public Spaces has published an opinion piece that says such "build it and they will come" approaches are ruining college campuses. The nonprofit planning, design and educational organization describes itself as "dedicated to helping people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities."

College tuition has been on the rise for 40 years, the article says, but rather than cutting costs colleges are spending more and more money on their exterior aesthetics.

"One of the boldest examples comes from the University of Cincinnati, which has enlisted a 'murderers' row' of architects to redesign their campus, including Frank Gehry, Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Bernard Tschumi, and Thom Mayne," Project for Public Spaces says. "This adds up to a lot of shiny new buildings, including the crown jewel — Mr. Mayne’s exorbitant $112.9 million Campus Recreation Center, which opened in 2006. But there’s even more in the works: UC's Department of Athletics has requested a $70 million renovation of the basketball arena, which, if approved, will open in 2017."

The article then points out that academic spending per full-time undergraduate student at UC dropped 24 percent between 2005 and 2013 "while its professors earn salaries that rank far below those at similar research institutions."

Read the full Project for Public Spaces story here.
 

Can Cincinnati learn from these "top 10 urban innovations"?


Now that Cincinnati is testing its first streetcars and enjoys a variety of craft beer microbreweries, we can safely cross "Become a city of the future" off our civic to-do list.

But wait, what about 10 or 15 years from now when this "future" stuff will be boring and stupid? What are cities of the future planning for the next round of futuristic city living?

The Urban Edge — a blog from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University — provides a peek at the top 10 urban innovations happening around the world right now, according to a new World Economic Forum report.

"In its report, WEF seeks to answer the simple question: what will the cities of tomorrow be like? It highlights 10 innovations happening right now that may offer clues," says the intro to a Dec. 2 blog post.

The top 10 list includes digitally re-programmable space, an internet of freshwater pipes, adopting trees through social media, augmented humanity, unleashing share capacity and five others. Who wants to bet which one makes it to Cincinnati first?

Read the full Urban Edge blog post here.
 

Jens Lekman making music more personal and intimate from Cincinnati


Jens Lekman is one of Sweden's best-known musicians and a darling of the indie pop world, writes Stephen Heyman in The New York Times. He has three full-length albums to his name, including 2007's Night Falls Over Kortedala, which made it onto several critics' lists of the last decade's best records.

Heyman runs a Q&A in the Times's International Arts section to explore Lekman's recent push into more intimate and immediate ways of music-making and explains how he was in Cincinnati this fall working on a project called "Ghostwriting" in which he interviewed people about their lives and turned their stories into songs he later released for free on his website.

Lekman performed a few weeks ago at the Woodward Theater in a collaboration with MYCincinnati Youth Orchestra.

Read the full New York Times Q&A here.
 

How transportation planning is stuck in the past


A new report from the National League of Cities, "City of the Future: Technology & Mobility," details the many challenges city and regional leaders face in adapting their planning efforts to coming workforce and demographic changes. Bob Graves, associate director of the Governing Institute, writes about the report's findings in Governing Magazine.

"For all we hear about the impact that technology and social changes are having on urban mobility, you'd certainly expect to see their influence reflected in city transportation planning," he says. "For the most part, unfortunately, this simply isn't the case."

In short, Graves writes, the NLC study finds that the cities' planning efforts focus heavily "on the problem of automobile congestion and prescribe increased infrastructure in the form of new roads as the primary cure."

The study analyzed city and regional transportation planning documents from the 50 most populous U.S. cities as well as the largest cities in every state, for a total of 68 communities. Cincinnati didn't make the cut, but our regional planning shortcomings are certainly echoed in the report.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers


The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.
 

Did Kentucky governor's race kill political polling?


Politicians like to say that the only poll that matters is on Election Day. That's starting to be more true, according to analysis in Governing Magazine.

Writer Alan Greenblatt points out that polls in the Kentucky governor's race consistently showed Democrat Jack Conway with a slight lead over Republican Matt Bevin. Not only did Bevin win, but it wasn't even close, as he took 53 percent of the vote to Conway's 44 percent.

The day after the election, The Lexington Herald-Leader announced it would dump Survey USA as its pollster.

"We might as well buy monkeys and dartboards vs. what we had here with Survey USA," Greenblatt quotes Kentucky Republican consultant Scott Jennings.

"The problems aren't limited to the Bluegrass State," the article says. "Last year, polls around the country underestimated the Republican strength in several Senate races, as well as the governor's race in Wisconsin. Conversely, in 2012, the Gallup Poll showed Mitt Romney beating Barack Obama in the presidential election."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"


The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 
537 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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