| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Non-Profit : Cincinnati In The News

36 Non-Profit Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati to join national list of Culinary Fight Club cities in April


Thanks to shows like Food Network's "Guy's Grocery Games" on Food Network and Bravo's "Top Chef," we're no stranger to food competitions. Cincinnati even hosts Food Fight 513, which pits local chefs against each other for the honor of top culinary dog.

This spring, Cincinnati will host its first-ever national Culinary Fight Club event. Chefs will sign up to compete in a taco round in April, a pantry race in September and a seafood competition in October.

At each event, attendees will watch as contestants — anyone from home cooks to executive chefs — raid the pantry in 45 seconds. Contestants get to choose from 15 provided ingredients, and from there, they have 60 minutes to create the most gourmet dish that represents their take on the monthly theme. The audience and judges vote and decide on a winning dish.

Culinary Fight Club also gives back exclusively to Fight2Feed, which partners top restaurants with food trucks to provide service and support to the hungry.

For more info on Culinary Fight Club or to register to compete in Cincinnati, click here.

To read the full article about Culinary Fight Club, click here.
 

Freedom Center recognizes civil rights champion

The New York Times reported that National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will honor Jim Obergefell on Oct. 22 with its Everyday Freedom Hero award which recognizes people and organizations that strive to live up to the ideals of the Underground Railroad movement.

Obergefell was the lead plaintiff in the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that led to the legalization of same sex marriage in 2015 as he  battled to have his marriage with his dying partner John Arthur legally recognized in Obergefell v. Hodges. The Everyday Freedom Hero Award presentation is free and open to the public. RSVPs are requested as seating is limited.

The Everyday Freedom Hero Award  was created to recognize individuals and organizations who strive to live up to the ideals of the Underground Railroad movement—courage, cooperation and perseverance, while using one’s resources for the wellbeing and betterment of their community.

After marrying John, his partner of more than 20 years, who was dying of ALS, they decided to file suit against the state of Ohio to demand recognition of their lawful Maryland marriage on John’s impending death certificate.

Read more here.

Walk through Findlay Market reveals 40 vendors & restaurants


Findlay Market is getting lots of attention this summer as new developments crop up around it and the streetcar opening looms near. USA Today recently named it one of the top U.S. food markets.

USA Today now has compiled a virtual "tour" of Findlay Market, complete with photos of vendors, merchants and restaurants. If you can't make it to the market, this tour is for you.

Take the full virtual tour here.
 

Eric Avner and People's Liberty lauded for innovative approach to philanthropy


People's Liberty is a five-year experiment to see how philanthropy can be done differently and possibly even more effectively, CEO Eric Avner explains in an "Innovator of the Week" profile story from Urban Innovation Exchange. Avner and his team didn't want something permanent but instead devised a timeline with a sense of urgency.
 
"Building this as a separate brand from the (Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation) gives us ability to be more experimental, to have a slightly cheekier tone, a different pace, a different way of using tech and design," Avner tells UIX. "All of these things, whether storytelling or design or metrics or outreach or work culture, will ultimately make us better grant makers. It also sets the tone for how to reach people in ways that are more authentic without seeming stuffy, but do it in a different way than foundations typically operate."
 
Avner, Vice President and Senior Program Manager at the Haile Foundation, launched People's Liberty in summer 2014 and awarded its first grants later that year.

Detroit-based Urban Innovation Exchange is an initiative to advance the growing movement of people leading change in cities. Launched in 2012 as a three-year project funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, UIX now showcases catalytic talent transforming cities and neighborhoods across the U.S.

Soapbox's parent company, Issue Media Group, is a UIX national partner.

Read the full Urban Innovation Exchange story here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Preservation Magazine sees how Covington's Shotgun Row fosters a sense of community


Preservation Magazine's Spring issue includes a glowing feature story on how Covington is bringing back its West Side neighborhood, centered around rehabs of old shotgun homes on Orchard Street.

Soapbox profiled several "neighborhood heroes" in 2015 who helped lead that revitalization effort, particularly around reducing crime. We also covered the Shotgun Row concept as it geared up in 2014 and homes were put on the market in 2015 as work/living spaces for artists.

Preservation Magazine — published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation — interviews Sarah Allan, program director for the nonprofit Center for Great Neighborhoods, about its ongoing efforts to acquire, rehabilitate and sell derelict or seriously dilapidated historic buildings on Covington's West Side, "a working-class enclave across the Ohio River from Cincinnati."

"The Center has completed more than 30 projects in Covington in recent years, but Shotgun Row, for which it received a state historic preservation award, might be its crown jewel," the story says.

"These houses were so far gone, people questioned why we would even want to save them," Allan tells the magazine. "But with this project we were leveraging so much more than just a single building. We basically took the worst block and helped transform it. People look at Shotgun Row now and don’t even see the (individual) houses. It's like its own beautiful entity. It was definitely the most transformative project we've ever done."

Read the full Preservation Magazine story here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

Can Cincinnati learn from these "top 10 urban innovations"?


Now that Cincinnati is testing its first streetcars and enjoys a variety of craft beer microbreweries, we can safely cross "Become a city of the future" off our civic to-do list.

But wait, what about 10 or 15 years from now when this "future" stuff will be boring and stupid? What are cities of the future planning for the next round of futuristic city living?

The Urban Edge — a blog from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University — provides a peek at the top 10 urban innovations happening around the world right now, according to a new World Economic Forum report.

"In its report, WEF seeks to answer the simple question: what will the cities of tomorrow be like? It highlights 10 innovations happening right now that may offer clues," says the intro to a Dec. 2 blog post.

The top 10 list includes digitally re-programmable space, an internet of freshwater pipes, adopting trees through social media, augmented humanity, unleashing share capacity and five others. Who wants to bet which one makes it to Cincinnati first?

Read the full Urban Edge blog post here.
 

25 years later: Cincinnati and Mapplethorpe


Cincinnati writer/artist Grace Dobush has a well-researched and well-written story in today's Washington Post about this weekend's activity at the Contemporary Arts Center celebrating the 25th anniversary of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's infamous Perfect Moment exhibition at the CAC. Events and the symposium continue through tomorrow; see the full schedule here.

Dobush does a nice job reminding readers of the local tumult in 1990, centering around the prosecution of the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and their subsequent acquittal by a Hamilton County jury. She also discusses Cincinnati's slow recovery from the culture wars that created an atmosphere where art could be prosecuted as obscenity.

"When Chris Seelbach became Cincinnati’s first openly gay City Council member in 2011 ... Cincinnati’s score on the Human Rights Council’s Municipal Equality Index, which evaluates cities on support for LGBT populations, was 68," Dobush writes. "As of 2014, it was a perfect 100. And Cincinnati son Jim Obergefell was at the center of the landmark Supreme Court decision this year to legalize gay marriage."

Interviews include Seelbach, CAC Director Raphaela Platow, Source Cincinnati's Julie Calvert, former Mercantile Library Director Albert Pyle and Vice Mayor David Mann. Great job, Grace!

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

When art fought the law in Cincinnati and art won


This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Contemporary Arts Center's Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, The Perfect Moment, that resulted in obscenity charges against the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and ultimately their exoneration by a Hamilton County jury. Smithsonian Magazine does a good job recapping the 1990 events and trying to explain how Cincinnati — the arts community and the city in general — has evolved since then.

Writer Alex Palmer interviews Barrie and his lead defense attorney, Lou Sirkin, to provide memories of the 1990 events as well as current CAC Director Raphaela Platow and Curator Steven Matijcio for "what does it mean today" context.
 
"The case has left a positive legacy for the CAC, and for Barrie, who went on to help defend offensive song lyrics at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum," Palmer writes. "'People see the CAC as a champion of the arts,' says Matijcio. 'We're still always trying to be challenging and topical, to draw on work that's relevant and of the moment.'"

The CAC commemorates the 25th anniversary with a series of programs and exhibitions, starting with a "Mapplethorpe + 25" symposium Oct. 23-24.

Read the full Smithsonian Magazine story here.
 

Wired likes local project's use of video games to fight urban decay


Wired magazine took notice of local designer Giacomo Ciminello's use of video game play to help re-invigorate blighted spaces through his People’s Liberty grant project, Spaced Invaders. Soapbox was on hand Aug. 27 for the project's first public display in Walnut Hills.

"I like the idea of just 'spaced invaders' because that is literally what we are doing," Ciminello tells Wired. "We aren't destroying property, we aren't making permanent marks. We are having fun, and opening up people's eyes to possibility. Why is this parking lot here? Empty? … What does this neighborhood or community need and can it be in this space? That's the kind of dialogue we are hoping for."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Cincinnati Public Library improves to fifth busiest in U.S.


The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County checked out more than 18 million items in 2014, making it the fifth busiest public library system in the U.S., according to a new Public Library Data Service statistical report. In last year’s report (2013 usage data), the Library was the sixth busiest library in the U.S.

The 2015 report is based on survey responses collected from more than 1,800 public libraries in the U.S. and Canada for fiscal year 2014. It's published each year by the Public Library Association, the largest division of the American Library Association.

Read the full Cincinnati Business Courier story here.
 

All signs point to Cincinnati


American Sign Museum was featured in a travel story in yesterday's Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer, the second time this year the funky Camp Washington museum has received national media coverage.

"For a guy who has spent his life around signs, Tod Swormstedt sure has a difficult name to fit on one," the article says in introducing the local icon. "He's the founder of the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, a celebration of the art of signage, from painted wooden panels to wildly lighted neon extravaganzas."

Writers Larissa and Michael Milne get in the requisite mention of Cincinnati chili at the end, pointing readers/visitors to nearby Camp Washington Chili.

Read the full Philadelphia Inquirer story here.
 

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.
 

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup


The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.
 
36 Non-Profit Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts