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Leadership : Cincinnati In The News

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Greater Cincinnati no. 1 metro area in sustainability


Site Selection released its 2017 Sustainability Rankings, which are driven by a unique index of factors. Ohio is the third most sustainable state in the U.S., and among U.S. metro areas, the Greater Cincinnati area landed itself at no. 1.

This ranking is in part because of companies like Procter & Gamble, which continues to pursue its own aggressive sustainability agenda. Recent green steps include investments in recycling and beneficial reuse that by 2020, will eliminate all manufacturing waste from P&G's global network of more than 100 production sites.

UC is also a leader in the sustainability game. The new $120 million Carl H. Lindner College of Business will be LEED Gold certified when it opens in 2019. Since 2004, UC has constructed six LEED-certified buildings, including the award-winning Morgans and Scioto student residence halls.

To see where other states, countries and metro areas ranked, click here.
 


Locally founded Crossroads now the fastest-growing church in the U.S.


Crossroads has come a long way since its founding in 1995. It has 10 physical locations in Ohio and Kentucky (including three in Cincinnati and one more on the way), which equates to more than 28,000 parishoners.

Outreach Magazine recently named Crossroads the fastest-growing church in the U.S.; in 2016, its attendance jumped 26 percent. (Also, Crossroads has about 21,000 more members than the no. 2 fastest-growing church.)

To read more about Crossroads and view the other top 10 fastest-growing churches in the country, click here.
 

The numbers don't lie: Cincinnatians know how to have a good time


According to a recent study from WalletHub, Cincinnati is the 13th most fun of the top 150 largest U.S. cities. The study examined 58 key metrics, including the number of fitness centers per capita to movie costs to the average open hours of breweries.

Here's how Cincinnati ranked in a few of these categories:
 
  • No. 9: Park playgrounds per capita
  • No. 15: Bar accessibility (have you been to Over-the-Rhine lately?)
  • No. 20: Festivals per capita (Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, Taste of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Food and Wine Classic, etc.)
  • No. 22: Restaurants per capita
  • No. 24: Average beer price (about $5 a pint)
  • No. 26: Fitness centers per capita
  • No 33: Number of attractions (Findlay Market, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Reds, Bengals, etc.)
  • No. 40: Parkland acres per capita
  • No. 61: Dance clubs per capita
  • No. 75: Movie costs
The full report is available here
 

Affordability makes Cincy hotbed for tech talent attraction


According to a new report from CBRE Group Inc., Ohio has some of the lowest living expenses in the U.S. for attracting tech talent, with Cincinnati among the leading cities.

The report shows that Cincinnati is the sixth-most affordable tech market in the U.S., with the Midwest home to four of the top six markets. The results are based on the rent-to-tech wage ratio in 50 U.S. cities.

Columbus came in at no. 1 with a ratio of 11.3 percent, followed by Oklahoma City (11.4 percent), St. Louis and San Antonio (12.6 percent each), Indianapolis (12.7 percent) and Cincinnati (13 percent).

Those six cities are also among the top 10 markets for the most affordable apartment rents. New York has the least affordable tech market (35 percent), followed by Long Island and Los Angeles.

To read the full report, click here.

 


Six area colleges earn nods for nation's best, top business programs


Miami University and the University of Cincinnati once again ranked highly on U.S. News & World Report's list of top colleges.

Miami came in at no. 78, up one spot from last year, and UC came in at no. 133, up two spots from last year.

The study is based on things like retention, graduation rate and how that graduation rate meets U.S. News' own predictions for the school. The next greatest factor are the opinions of college presidents and provosts, as well as high school guidance counselors. It also looks at faculty resources, class size, faculty pay, the percentage of faculty with the highest degrees in their fields, student performance, financial resources and alumni giving.

Miami received an overall score of 55/100, with high marks in retention (91 percent) and graduation rate (78 percent). UC received an overall score of 43/100, with a retention rate of 87 percent and a 67 percent graduation rate.

Three other area schools also received recognition from U.S. News:
 
  • Xavier ranked no. 5 among regional universities in the Midwest
  • Mount St. Joseph University ranked no. 87 in the Midwest
  • NKU ranked no. 73 among Southern regional universities
  • Thomas More College ranked no. 80 in the South
  • Miami's Farmer School of Business ranked no. 45
  • UC's Lindner School of Business ranked no. 91
  • Xavier's Williams School of Business ranked no. 128
Click here to see the full list.
 

Kroger launching restaurant concept in NKY store


Kroger is getting ready to launch its first restaurant concept, Kitchen 1883, out of it's Union, Ky., store. The restaurant's menu will feature comfort food with made-from-scratch dishes and a bar with hand-crafted cocktails.

With Amazon's recent purchase of Whole Foods and inexpensive alternatives like Aldi, this new enterprise is a way for Kroger, which is the largest grocery chain in America, to raise the bar and get ahead of the competition.

Grocery chains owning and operating restaurants isn't a new thing — Hy-Vee is a franchisee owner of 26 Wahlburger locations, making it the largest franchisee of the burger chain.

You can read more about Kroger's restaurant here.
 

La Soupe is on the fast track to help reduce the number of food insecure children in Cincinnati


Suzy DeYoung is perhaps best known for being the chef at La Petite Pierre, but she's now tackling something else that she's passionate about: food waste.

In 2014, DeYoung founded La Soupe, a nonprofit that seeks to feed the hungry with "leftover" food from local grocery stores, farms and restaurants. She takes all of that food and turns it into flavorful and inventive soups, which are then frozen and distributed to those in need.

On average, America wastes about 40 percent of the available food. In Cincinnati, this statistic is staggering because the childhood poverty rate is about double the national average, leaving many kids — and families — food insecure.

Last year, La Soupe saved about 125,000 pounds of produce from the landfill, and served 800 quarts a week through 47 participating agencies around the city during the school year. By July of this year, they’d already surpassed that amount of salvage, and expect to double it by the end of the year.

Click here to read more about La Soupe and DeYoung's efforts to reduce food insecurity and waste in Cincinnati.
 

District 3 police headquarters showcased in sustainability design magazine


The new, 39,600-square-foot, District 3 police headquarters that serves about 95,000 people form Price Hill to Riverside to Westwood was completed in 2015. It's the first LEED platinum and net zero police station in the world, and was recently featured in Net Zero Buildings magazine.

A net zero building means that the total amount of energy used by the building annually is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on site.

The old police station was split between two historic buildings, and was inefficient for many reasons. When designing the new station, the goal was threefold: Maintain building security, insure occupant comfort and create a welcoming space that enhances the relationship between the public and the police.

Community engagement with neighborhood committees factored into the design process, as well as public art within the building and on the surrounding site.

Messer Construction was the general contractor, and emersion DESIGN was the architect.

To read more about the new District 3 headquarters and what it means for sustainability design, click here.
 

Two Cincy universities make Money's best value list


Each year, Money releases its study of colleges and universities that yield the best bang for your buck. This year, the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University made the list.

Xavier came in at no. 438 and UC was ranked at no. 583.

Xavier's cost of tuition is estimated at $52,700 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 56 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 9 percent receive merit-based grants. After financial assistance, tuition is estimated at about $29,800.

The cost of an education at UC is estimated at $29,300 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 24 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 21 percent receive merit-based grants, with an average cost of tuition after financial aid of $21,800.

View the full list here, and learn how Money came up with its ranking.

People's Liberty continues to make waves


People's Liberty is at the halfway point of its five-year mission. To date, it's funded 50 Cincinnatians to bring innovative ideas to the city — and it still has 50 more projects to fund.

PL has two rounds of applications a year; once projects are chosen, grants are given in three categories: $10,000 art installation grants, $15,000 storefront grants (the grantee sets up shop for six weeks in the Dept. of Doing, PL's first-floor retail space) and two $100,000 Haile Fellowships.

The philanthropic foundation's goal is to fund creative projects that lead to social engagement or change.

Read more about PL in this article from Forbes.
 

People's Liberty grantees featured on national podcast


This week's episode of the popular Plural of You podcast featured two local People's Liberty grantees and authors of The Neighborhood Playbook.

The podcast described Joe Nikol and Kevin Wright as two Cincinnati-based planners who "wrote a field manual...to guide developers and residents alike toward a common development model, which they divided into five steps or 'plays.'”

"What I’ve learned from Kevin and Joe is that community development doesn’t have to be this enormous, out-of-reach process that we sometimes imagine it to be," says the podcast host. "There are certainly caveats, and we have to be willing to let go of our own ideas and compromise sometimes to see them grow. At least we have the steps now to get out and start something new."

Click here for the full-length Plural of You episode.

 

Cincinnati among top cities of the future in the U.S.


fDi Intelligence recently released its list of cities of the future, and Cincinnati made it, mostly in part to the flurry of tech and startup activity here.

New York came out on top of the national list, followed by San Francisco, Houston, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Boston, Atlanta, Sao Paulo and Sunnyvale, Cali.

Along with the national list, fDi also looks at subcategories, which is where Cincinnati was recognized multiple times. The Queen City placed:
  • Sixth overall in Large Cities of American Cities of the Future
  • Ninth in Large Cities for Economic Potential
  • Eighth in Large Cities for Business Friendliness
  • Fourth in Large Cities for FDI Strategy

Foreign direct investment, or FDI, is a strategy that the City of Cincinnati's Department of Community and Economic Development is focused on to generate innovative financing, helping to close the financial gap and bring catalytic developments to the area.

A strong FDI plan enables the City of Cincinnati to create jobs, fill real estate and infrastructure gaps and open trade opportunities.

The rankings further reinforce Cincinnati’s visibility as a city well-positioned for global connectivity. On March 31, the Department of Community and Economic Development partnered with REDI Cincinnati to host an FDI symposium featuring key local, regional, national and international executives who came together to discuss the many facets and implications of foreign capital flows into the region.

A regional resource manual based on best practices and insights from the event will be compiled and shared based on ideas shared at the symposium.

Check out the full list of Cities of the Future here.
 


Butler County SBDC receives national award, celebrated on #SBDCDay


The Butler County Small Business Development Center recently received the 2017 National Small Business Development Center of the Year award. It celebrated its accomplishments on March 22, or #SBDCDay.

Over the past three years, the Butler County SBDC has generated over $20 million in loan funding to local small businesses. The Hamilton Mill-based organization helps build small businesses through a number of programs and activities — combined with strategic partnerships with other business-oriented groups — to provide a strong entrepreneurial assistance environment in Butler County.

The SBDC network was signed into law in 1980, and since then, the network has grown to over 1,000 centers. America’s SBDC network leverages a partnership that includes U.S. Congress, SBA, the private sector, and the colleges, universities and state governments that manage SBDCs across the nation. Each year, SBDCs provide management and technical assistance to about one million small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs.

Read more about #SBDCDay here.

UC School of Law receives "A" grade from National Jurist, moves up in national ranking


In 2014, the University of Cincinnati College of Law was ranked by National Jurist as one of the top 60 law schools in the country. This year, UC's law school came in at no. 13 with an "A" grade.

Rankings are based on the school's experiential learning opportunities, with data provided by the American Bar Association and the individual schools. National Jurist looked at five categories: clinics, externships, simulation courses, interschool competitions and "other."

Clinical experience is most important, as students get the chance to work with real clients, under the direction of their professors. UC has a number of programs where students get this real-world experience, including a partnership with MORTAR that allows students to provide free legal counsel to clients

To read the article, "Best Schools for Practical Training," and to see the full list, click here.

 

Miami Ohio business students advanced to finals round of VCIC competition and took home second


A group of business students from Miami University scored big in the first round and took home $1,000 at the regional Venture Capital Investment Competition, held in Chicago. Miami was the only school in Ohio and one of only seven schools in the Midwest to get an invite.


The VCIC is an invitation-only international competition that's carried out over two rounds: a preliminary round held in five different regions with 6-8 schools and a finals round with winners from each region competing for the international title. Student teams act as institutional investors representing a venture capital firm.

Teams are given business plans from three real-world startups, as well as information about the venture capital firm they're representing and a profile of the venture fund from which they're going to make their investments. Teams then have 36 hours to conduct research, analyze the market and prepare questions for a Q&A with the founders. On the final day of the competition, teams listen to and evaluate each startup’s pitch presentation and conduct a one-on-one interview with the founder of each company.

With the regional victory, the team competed in the finals round of the competition this past weekend in Chapel Hill. At the international competition, the Miami team took home second place. 

Read more about the competition here.

 

 


 
438 Leadership Articles | Page: | Show All
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