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Leadership : Cincinnati In The News

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District 3 police headquarters showcased in sustainability design magazine


The new, 39,600-square-foot, District 3 police headquarters that serves about 95,000 people form Price Hill to Riverside to Westwood was completed in 2015. It's the first LEED platinum and net zero police station in the world, and was recently featured in Net Zero Buildings magazine.

A net zero building means that the total amount of energy used by the building annually is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on site.

The old police station was split between two historic buildings, and was inefficient for many reasons. When designing the new station, the goal was threefold: Maintain building security, insure occupant comfort and create a welcoming space that enhances the relationship between the public and the police.

Community engagement with neighborhood committees factored into the design process, as well as public art within the building and on the surrounding site.

Messer Construction was the general contractor, and emersion DESIGN was the architect.

To read more about the new District 3 headquarters and what it means for sustainability design, click here.
 

Two Cincy universities make Money's best value list


Each year, Money releases its study of colleges and universities that yield the best bang for your buck. This year, the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University made the list.

Xavier came in at no. 438 and UC was ranked at no. 583.

Xavier's cost of tuition is estimated at $52,700 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 56 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 9 percent receive merit-based grants. After financial assistance, tuition is estimated at about $29,800.

The cost of an education at UC is estimated at $29,300 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 24 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 21 percent receive merit-based grants, with an average cost of tuition after financial aid of $21,800.

View the full list here, and learn how Money came up with its ranking.

People's Liberty continues to make waves


People's Liberty is at the halfway point of its five-year mission. To date, it's funded 50 Cincinnatians to bring innovative ideas to the city — and it still has 50 more projects to fund.

PL has two rounds of applications a year; once projects are chosen, grants are given in three categories: $10,000 art installation grants, $15,000 storefront grants (the grantee sets up shop for six weeks in the Dept. of Doing, PL's first-floor retail space) and two $100,000 Haile Fellowships.

The philanthropic foundation's goal is to fund creative projects that lead to social engagement or change.

Read more about PL in this article from Forbes.
 

People's Liberty grantees featured on national podcast


This week's episode of the popular Plural of You podcast featured two local People's Liberty grantees and authors of The Neighborhood Playbook.

The podcast described Joe Nikol and Kevin Wright as two Cincinnati-based planners who "wrote a field manual...to guide developers and residents alike toward a common development model, which they divided into five steps or 'plays.'”

"What I’ve learned from Kevin and Joe is that community development doesn’t have to be this enormous, out-of-reach process that we sometimes imagine it to be," says the podcast host. "There are certainly caveats, and we have to be willing to let go of our own ideas and compromise sometimes to see them grow. At least we have the steps now to get out and start something new."

Click here for the full-length Plural of You episode.

 

Cincinnati among top cities of the future in the U.S.


fDi Intelligence recently released its list of cities of the future, and Cincinnati made it, mostly in part to the flurry of tech and startup activity here.

New York came out on top of the national list, followed by San Francisco, Houston, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Boston, Atlanta, Sao Paulo and Sunnyvale, Cali.

Along with the national list, fDi also looks at subcategories, which is where Cincinnati was recognized multiple times. The Queen City placed:
  • Sixth overall in Large Cities of American Cities of the Future
  • Ninth in Large Cities for Economic Potential
  • Eighth in Large Cities for Business Friendliness
  • Fourth in Large Cities for FDI Strategy

Foreign direct investment, or FDI, is a strategy that the City of Cincinnati's Department of Community and Economic Development is focused on to generate innovative financing, helping to close the financial gap and bring catalytic developments to the area.

A strong FDI plan enables the City of Cincinnati to create jobs, fill real estate and infrastructure gaps and open trade opportunities.

The rankings further reinforce Cincinnati’s visibility as a city well-positioned for global connectivity. On March 31, the Department of Community and Economic Development partnered with REDI Cincinnati to host an FDI symposium featuring key local, regional, national and international executives who came together to discuss the many facets and implications of foreign capital flows into the region.

A regional resource manual based on best practices and insights from the event will be compiled and shared based on ideas shared at the symposium.

Check out the full list of Cities of the Future here.
 


Butler County SBDC receives national award, celebrated on #SBDCDay


The Butler County Small Business Development Center recently received the 2017 National Small Business Development Center of the Year award. It celebrated its accomplishments on March 22, or #SBDCDay.

Over the past three years, the Butler County SBDC has generated over $20 million in loan funding to local small businesses. The Hamilton Mill-based organization helps build small businesses through a number of programs and activities — combined with strategic partnerships with other business-oriented groups — to provide a strong entrepreneurial assistance environment in Butler County.

The SBDC network was signed into law in 1980, and since then, the network has grown to over 1,000 centers. America’s SBDC network leverages a partnership that includes U.S. Congress, SBA, the private sector, and the colleges, universities and state governments that manage SBDCs across the nation. Each year, SBDCs provide management and technical assistance to about one million small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs.

Read more about #SBDCDay here.

UC School of Law receives "A" grade from National Jurist, moves up in national ranking


In 2014, the University of Cincinnati College of Law was ranked by National Jurist as one of the top 60 law schools in the country. This year, UC's law school came in at no. 13 with an "A" grade.

Rankings are based on the school's experiential learning opportunities, with data provided by the American Bar Association and the individual schools. National Jurist looked at five categories: clinics, externships, simulation courses, interschool competitions and "other."

Clinical experience is most important, as students get the chance to work with real clients, under the direction of their professors. UC has a number of programs where students get this real-world experience, including a partnership with MORTAR that allows students to provide free legal counsel to clients

To read the article, "Best Schools for Practical Training," and to see the full list, click here.

 

Miami Ohio business students advanced to finals round of VCIC competition and took home second


A group of business students from Miami University scored big in the first round and took home $1,000 at the regional Venture Capital Investment Competition, held in Chicago. Miami was the only school in Ohio and one of only seven schools in the Midwest to get an invite.


The VCIC is an invitation-only international competition that's carried out over two rounds: a preliminary round held in five different regions with 6-8 schools and a finals round with winners from each region competing for the international title. Student teams act as institutional investors representing a venture capital firm.

Teams are given business plans from three real-world startups, as well as information about the venture capital firm they're representing and a profile of the venture fund from which they're going to make their investments. Teams then have 36 hours to conduct research, analyze the market and prepare questions for a Q&A with the founders. On the final day of the competition, teams listen to and evaluate each startup’s pitch presentation and conduct a one-on-one interview with the founder of each company.

With the regional victory, the team competed in the finals round of the competition this past weekend in Chapel Hill. At the international competition, the Miami team took home second place. 

Read more about the competition here.

 

 


 

Rhinegeist founder used data algorithm to determine future


Before co-founding Rhinegeist Brewery, Bob Bonder was working in San Francisco for a business consulting firm. He used his company's data algorithm to predict what his next move should be.

Originally, Bonder thought about opening a bed-and-breakfast in Brazil, but after the algorithm revealed that Asheville, NC, and Cincinnati were the best places for him to pursue his love of coffee, he spent time in each city and decided the Queen City was the place for him. He started Tazza Mia Coffee, but realized that Cincinnatians loved beer even more than coffee. 

He teamed up with Bryant Goulding, who had experience in the craft beer industry, and they opened Rhinegeist in 2013.

To read the full article about Rhinegeist's beginnings and success, click here.
 

Local startup makes list of top up-and-coming startups in the world


In 2009, market researcher Quid (then called YouNoodle) put together a list of the world's 50 most promising startups. Although a number of the companies named to that initial list don't exist anymore, others like Evernote and Spotify have increased exponentially in value.

Quid put together another list, and based its findings on these top three criteria:
  • Have the founders worked together before?
  • Is the business in a popular sector?
  • Has it raised funding quickly?
After researching 50,000 startups, it came up with a list that includes Cincinnati's own Eccrine Systems. It is developing a non-invasive, electronic wearable system that measures and transmits real-time data about human sweat; since its inception, the company has raised a total of $8.9 million.

To see Quid's full list of rising star startups, read this article from Bloomberg.

UC grad named to Forbes' 30 Under 30 List


Mario Jovan Shaw, a 2012 University of Cincinnati grad, made Forbes' list of 30 Under 30 in the social entrepreneurship category.

Shaw and business partner Jason Terrell started Profound Gentlemen, an education-based nonprofit. The organization is made up of 100 male educators of color from around the country who provide mentorship to young men of color.

Shaw joins 599 other standout artists, techies, educators, scientists, foodies, gamers, doctors, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, entertainers, lawyers, marketers, musicians and athletes in this year's 30 Under 30 class.

To read more about the 600 members of 2017's class of 30 Under 30, click here.

Eric Avner and People's Liberty lauded for innovative approach to philanthropy


People's Liberty is a five-year experiment to see how philanthropy can be done differently and possibly even more effectively, CEO Eric Avner explains in an "Innovator of the Week" profile story from Urban Innovation Exchange. Avner and his team didn't want something permanent but instead devised a timeline with a sense of urgency.
 
"Building this as a separate brand from the (Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation) gives us ability to be more experimental, to have a slightly cheekier tone, a different pace, a different way of using tech and design," Avner tells UIX. "All of these things, whether storytelling or design or metrics or outreach or work culture, will ultimately make us better grant makers. It also sets the tone for how to reach people in ways that are more authentic without seeming stuffy, but do it in a different way than foundations typically operate."
 
Avner, Vice President and Senior Program Manager at the Haile Foundation, launched People's Liberty in summer 2014 and awarded its first grants later that year.

Detroit-based Urban Innovation Exchange is an initiative to advance the growing movement of people leading change in cities. Launched in 2012 as a three-year project funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, UIX now showcases catalytic talent transforming cities and neighborhoods across the U.S.

Soapbox's parent company, Issue Media Group, is a UIX national partner.

Read the full Urban Innovation Exchange story here.
 

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 

Streetcars: If you build it, will they come?


Slow to build and expensive to operate, streetcars could be the most maligned mode of transportation in America, Governing Magazine says in its June issue, but cities keep building them.

This could be a banner year for streetcar openings, Daniel Vock writes, with a total of eight streetcar projects opening or about to come online, including five in cities with no previous service: Cincinnati; Detroit; Kansas City, Mo.; St. Louis; and Washington, D.C.

"What generally distinguishes streetcars from light rail is that streetcars are smaller, travel in traffic, have shorter routes and make more frequent stops," he writes. "Light rail is built to move people between neighborhoods, while streetcars typically help people get around within neighborhoods. Although the distinctions may seem small, they help explain why streetcars seem to get a lot more criticism than light rail projects, even though both have proliferated rapidly in recent years."

The most emulated streetcar system in the country is Portland’s, Vock says, and a "pilgrimage to Portland is virtually a prerequisite for any city leader serious about building a streetcar system at home. Cincinnati’s delegation has visited Portland 39 times because it’s an example of how a streetcar can both improve transportation and create a vibrant neighborhood out of an overlooked industrial area."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Local startup Spatial among 12 international companies in auto mobility accelerator


The mobility accelerator operated by Boulder-Color.-based Techstars recently named Cincinnati startup Spatial as one of the 12 companies in its Techstars Mobility Class of 2016. Each is building automotive mobility technologies and services that enable people and goods to move around more freely, according to the announcement posted on Techstars' website.

"The quality of teams and companies applying this year has been incredible," writes Techstars Mobility Managing Director Ted Serbinski. "We saw a world-wide response with applications from 52 countries across 6 continents. There was a 44 percent increase in mobility-focused companies. Most impressive, 50 percent of the 2016 companies include founders with diverse backgrounds."

Spatial uses data from social media platforms to describe the feel of a neighborhood on maps, a big help to people planning trips to cities or areas they aren't familiar with. The startup was part of Ocean's accelerator class earlier this year, graduating in April.

As part of the Techstars Mobility Class, Serbinski says, Spatial will participate in a Sept. 8 demo day "where we expect over 1,000 people to come see and meet these 12 startups."

Techstars has increased its investment relationship with Cintrifuse in recent years and is partnering with Cintrifuse to present its annual FounderCon in Cincinnati in October.

Read the full Techstars blog post here.
 
431 Leadership Articles | Page: | Show All
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