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Entrepreneurship : Cincinnati In The News

199 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 

UPDATE: AT&T to launch "smart cities" push with forward-thinking regions


AT&T is announcing this week how it will work with cities to turn everyday objects like traffic lights and parking spots into tools to manage congestion and conserve energy. Re/Code — a tech news, reviews and analysis website from Vox Media — says the "smart cities" sector, which includes everything from revamping the energy grid to digitizing government processes, is estimated to be a $1.5 trillion market by 2020 and that AT&T is anxious to get become a leader in the field.

"We see this as a massive opportunity," AT&T Mobility CEO Glenn Lurie told the website.

Broadly defined, explains Re/Code, "a smart city uses technology to change how urban environments are designed and managed to reduce expenses and improve efficiency. Telecom companies are working with forward-thinking municipalities to make decisions based on data from sensors added to locations and objects throughout the city. Imagine your car alerting you to the location of an open parking spot based on data broadcast by the spaces themselves or not having to wait at red lights because the road knows you are the only car there."

UPDATE: AT&T has announced that its first three U.S. partner cities will be Atlanta, Chicago and Dallas. Maybe next time for Cincinnati?

Read the full Re/Code post here.
 

Co-ops are an old alternative to the new app-based economy


Companies like Uber drive money out of local communities and erase the benefits that employees have fought hard for, Alex Morgan writes in Governing Magazine. Co-ops could slow that shift.

Morgan cites the example of a city like Cincinnati adopting a co-op ride-sharing model as a way for people to keep their dollars in their own communities.

"Taxi drivers in, say, Cincinnati (perhaps those already driving for Uber or Lyft) could band together and start a co-op service with its own app that might be called Big Red Ride," he writes. "Members could keep the 20 to 30 percent Uber would otherwise get and use that money to not only undercut Uber on price but also to provide Big Red Ride’s driver-owners with health insurance, vacation time and so on."

Morgan thinks the ongoing shift to an app-based economy is pushing communities to a real crossroads.

"Unless current trends are countered ... this new economy has the potential to return us to a very old economy, a pre-Industrial Revolution one in which merchants put out work at meager piece rates to families and individuals," he writes. "Co-ops are flexible because at their core is not technology but a set of legally defined relationships. The owners, or members, have control, not outside investors. People vote, not money."

Xavier University hosted a conference on the co-op movement in November, which Soapbox previewed here. Xavier will host a follow-up conference, The Cooperative Economy: Building a More Sustainable Future, April 21-22 at its on-campus Cintas Center.

Would Cincy Red Bike be interested in starting a ride-sharing co-op?

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati one of the fastest growing U.S. "creative class hotspots"


Richard Florida, who invented the "creative class" concept when writing about trends among young, educated and mobile workers, has a new article on The Atlantic's CityLab website comparing U.S. cities' concentrations of the creative class in 2014 vs. 2000. Thanks to the efforts of many people here, Greater Cincinnati has the fifth fastest growing population of creative class residents among the 50 largest metro areas.

Cincinnati's creative class grew by 21 percent between 2000 and 2014, placing it in heady company with Las Vegas, Indianapolis, Portland and Salt Lake City.

"While most studies equate talent with the share of adults who hold college degrees, the creative class gauges what workers actually do by identifying the occupations in which they're employed," Florida writes. "Since I first wrote about this class more than a decade ago, it has gained millions more members. Today it comprises roughly a third of the workforce and accounts for about half of all wages and salaries across the United States."

The top cities in 2014 for creative class residents as a share of overall population are still on the coasts: San Jose, Washington D.C., Boston, San Francisco and Hartford, Conn. But Florida is impressed that job growth associated with the creative class has made inroads in the Midwest.

"When all is said and done, the winners and losers of the creative class look much the same in 2014 as they did in 2000," he writes. "But it's heartening to see that some of the metros with the lowest creative class shares a decade and a half ago — Las Vegas, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Milwaukee — have made substantial gains. This bodes well for the future prosperity of these metros, demonstrating that substantial creative class growth can occur in places that once lagged pretty far behind."

Read the full CityLab story here.
 

Can Cincinnati learn from these "top 10 urban innovations"?


Now that Cincinnati is testing its first streetcars and enjoys a variety of craft beer microbreweries, we can safely cross "Become a city of the future" off our civic to-do list.

But wait, what about 10 or 15 years from now when this "future" stuff will be boring and stupid? What are cities of the future planning for the next round of futuristic city living?

The Urban Edge — a blog from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University — provides a peek at the top 10 urban innovations happening around the world right now, according to a new World Economic Forum report.

"In its report, WEF seeks to answer the simple question: what will the cities of tomorrow be like? It highlights 10 innovations happening right now that may offer clues," says the intro to a Dec. 2 blog post.

The top 10 list includes digitally re-programmable space, an internet of freshwater pipes, adopting trees through social media, augmented humanity, unleashing share capacity and five others. Who wants to bet which one makes it to Cincinnati first?

Read the full Urban Edge blog post here.
 

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers


The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.
 

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"


The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 

Procter & Gamble to run its home care/fabric product factories with wind power


Procter & Gamble officials announced at their annual shareholder meeting that the company is teaming up with EDF Renewable Energy to build a wind farm in Texas to power all of its North American plants that manufacture home care and fabric products. Those facilities make some of the company’s best-known household items, including Tide, Febreze and Mr. Clean.

"It is Procter & Gamble’s biggest foray into wind power, and is the latest in a burst of partnerships between major American corporations and renewable energy companies," writes Rachel Abrams in The New York Times. "The initiative also represents an opportunity for P.&G. to garner good will with environmentally conscious consumers at a time when personal care companies are under more pressure than ever to respond to their concerns."

Shailesh Jejurikar, president of P&G’s North American fabric care division, told The Times, "More and more, we find a very large number — call it two-thirds of consumers — looking to make some kind of contribution in the space, and hopefully not making trade-offs in value or performance."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

How a fiddler and an astrophysicist introduced predictive analytics to Cincinnati


Backchannel, a tech-focused subsite at Medium.com, is back at it, heaping praise on the city of Cincinnati's efforts to lead the charge toward the future of local government by integrating data into its daily operations. The praise is centered on Ed Cunningham, head of the city's building code enforcement operations who also happens to be front man and fiddle player for Comet Bluegrass All-Stars.

Back in April, Backchannel writer Susan Crawford used glowing terms to describe how City Manager Harry Black and Chief Performance Officer Chad Kenney built the city's Office of Performance and Data Analytics. With this new story she revisits Cincinnati's newfound fascination with data, focusing on Cunningham's experiments with Predictive Blight Prevention.

"Even if you aren’t immediately eager to read another column about Cincinnati, keep going," Crawford writes. "Like other good stories, this one has drama, memorable characters, sudden bursts of insight, and a cliffhanger ending that hints at future episodes. It also has a soundtrack."

Read the full Backchannel article here.
 

Wired likes local project's use of video games to fight urban decay


Wired magazine took notice of local designer Giacomo Ciminello's use of video game play to help re-invigorate blighted spaces through his People’s Liberty grant project, Spaced Invaders. Soapbox was on hand Aug. 27 for the project's first public display in Walnut Hills.

"I like the idea of just 'spaced invaders' because that is literally what we are doing," Ciminello tells Wired. "We aren't destroying property, we aren't making permanent marks. We are having fun, and opening up people's eyes to possibility. Why is this parking lot here? Empty? … What does this neighborhood or community need and can it be in this space? That's the kind of dialogue we are hoping for."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Social media roundup of FC Cincinnati announcement


FC Cincinnati was introduced Wednesday as an expansion team in the United Soccer League (USL), the equivalent of AA minor league baseball in the hierarchy of U.S. soccer. The team will play at UC's newly renovated Nippert Stadium starting next year, and former U.S. Men’s National Team standout John Harkes will be its first head coach.

The USL has a roundup of social media reaction to and coverage of the FC Cincinnati announcement.

See the full report on the United Soccer League website.
 

Cincinnati's marketing efforts a "best practices" model for collaboration


Andrew Levine writes about "marketing places" for Forbes, and his most recent article discussed how successful cities find ways for their two main marketing organizations — the convention and visitors bureau and the economic development agency —  to work together to increase investment in the city.

Levine suggests five ways the two marketing organizations should collaborate and uses Cincinnati as one of his "best practices" examples.

"Cincinnati is a good example of collaboration," he writes. "In May 2014, the Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, REDI Cincinnati and half a dozen major arts organizations in the region led a ten-day mission to New York City (titled 'Cincy in NYC'). Amid performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and the Joyce Theatre, the group connected with meeting planners, site selection consultants, corporate executives, travel/business media and past Cincinnati residents. It was a tour de force for the community."

Read the full Forbes article here.
 

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy


Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.
 

Midwestern cities connect manufacturing past with tomorrow's next big tech invention


Next City looks at how Midwestern cities are trying to revive manufacturing in the startup economy under the catchy title "Cleveland Wants to Make Sure the Next Wright Brothers Come From the Rust Belt." Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

The article is written by Lee Chilcote, managing editor of Fresh Water, Soapbox's sister publication in Cleveland, and focuses on emerging "hardware" startup scenes in Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown. Although Cincinnati isn't mentioned, the manufacturing startup ecosystem here — embodied at First Batch and Hamilton Mill, among other local business backers — certainly fits the changing dynamic the article describes.

"Hardware startups ... are more viable than ever thanks to evolving prototyping technology and, in many places, a renewed emphasis on advanced manufacturing," Chilcote writes. "While software's promised land has long been Silicon Valley, the Rust Belt is fast becoming a land of milk and honey — and plasma — for hardware. In cities such as Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown, Ohio, there is already an infrastructure for affordable manufacturing in place. Plenty of institutional partners like NASA in Cleveland are eager to support new entrepreneurs."

Read the full Next City article here.
 
199 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All
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