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Diversity : Cincinnati In The News

202 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati ranked fourth healthiest city in the U.S.


According to data compiled by Healthgrades Inc., Cincinnati is the fourth healthiest city in the country. It came in just behind the Twin Cities, Denver and Sacramento, and just head of Portland, Baltimore and Milwaukee.


Cincinnati ranks very high in access to high-quality hospitals, and it received grades near the national average for the overall health of its population and the ratio of doctors to the population, but fell short in the risky behaviors ranking.

Healthgrades’ new index is designed to help consumers make healthcare choices in their market. It was created by combining information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2015 survey, the 2015 Association of American Medical Colleges Report and the Healthgrades 2018 hospital quality rankings.

To see how other cities stacked up, click here.
 


Locally founded Crossroads now the fastest-growing church in the U.S.


Crossroads has come a long way since its founding in 1995. It has 10 physical locations in Ohio and Kentucky (including three in Cincinnati and one more on the way), which equates to more than 28,000 parishoners.

Outreach Magazine recently named Crossroads the fastest-growing church in the U.S.; in 2016, its attendance jumped 26 percent. (Also, Crossroads has about 21,000 more members than the no. 2 fastest-growing church.)

To read more about Crossroads and view the other top 10 fastest-growing churches in the country, click here.
 

OTR named one of five Great Neighborhoods by the APA


Last week, the American Planning Association named Over-the-Rhine one of five Great Neighborhoods on its annual Great Places in America list. The list marks the kick-off for the APA’s National Community Planning Month celebration.

Like much of the city, OTR has undergone huge changes in the past 15 years, and it's now considered one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Planning efforts showcase the historic nature of OTR and will help preserve the neighborhood’s legacy.

As part of the distinction, Mayor John Cranley declared Oct. 4 “Over-the-Rhine ‘Great Neighborhood’ Day” in Cincinnati.

Through continued public-private partnerships and the ongoing support of the community’s residents, developers have been able to restore historic buildings like Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the former St. Paul's Evangelical Church (now home to Taft's Ale House); create community gathering spaces like Washington Park and Ziegler Park; and create new housing options all over OTR.

Along with OTR, APA also recognized Seward in Minneapolis; the Heart of Missoula; Uptown Greenwood, SC; and Pearl in San Antonio.

Click here to read more about APA's Great Places in America. 
 


La Soupe is on the fast track to help reduce the number of food insecure children in Cincinnati


Suzy DeYoung is perhaps best known for being the chef at La Petite Pierre, but she's now tackling something else that she's passionate about: food waste.

In 2014, DeYoung founded La Soupe, a nonprofit that seeks to feed the hungry with "leftover" food from local grocery stores, farms and restaurants. She takes all of that food and turns it into flavorful and inventive soups, which are then frozen and distributed to those in need.

On average, America wastes about 40 percent of the available food. In Cincinnati, this statistic is staggering because the childhood poverty rate is about double the national average, leaving many kids — and families — food insecure.

Last year, La Soupe saved about 125,000 pounds of produce from the landfill, and served 800 quarts a week through 47 participating agencies around the city during the school year. By July of this year, they’d already surpassed that amount of salvage, and expect to double it by the end of the year.

Click here to read more about La Soupe and DeYoung's efforts to reduce food insecurity and waste in Cincinnati.
 

Two Cincy universities make Money's best value list


Each year, Money releases its study of colleges and universities that yield the best bang for your buck. This year, the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University made the list.

Xavier came in at no. 438 and UC was ranked at no. 583.

Xavier's cost of tuition is estimated at $52,700 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 56 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 9 percent receive merit-based grants. After financial assistance, tuition is estimated at about $29,800.

The cost of an education at UC is estimated at $29,300 for the 2017-2018 school year, and about 24 percent of applicants receive need-based grants and 21 percent receive merit-based grants, with an average cost of tuition after financial aid of $21,800.

View the full list here, and learn how Money came up with its ranking.

P&G CEO David Taylor rated one of the top in the country


Glassdoor recently released its list of highest rated CEOS, employees' choice. Each CEO is ranked based on what employees have to say about them and the company, job openings and salaries at the company and company benefits.

David Taylor, CEO of P&G, once again made the list. This is the second year in a row that Taylor has been included in the ranking, although in 2016, he was ranked no. 11, and this year, he came in at no. 76 with a 90 percent employee approval rating. (For comparison, the CEO at the no. 1 spot, Benno Dorer of The Clorox Company, has a 99 percent employee approval rating.)

Other accolades for P&G include a top 25 spot on Glassdoor's Best Places to Work list in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2015.

To see the full list of CEOs, click here.
 

People's Liberty continues to make waves


People's Liberty is at the halfway point of its five-year mission. To date, it's funded 50 Cincinnatians to bring innovative ideas to the city — and it still has 50 more projects to fund.

PL has two rounds of applications a year; once projects are chosen, grants are given in three categories: $10,000 art installation grants, $15,000 storefront grants (the grantee sets up shop for six weeks in the Dept. of Doing, PL's first-floor retail space) and two $100,000 Haile Fellowships.

The philanthropic foundation's goal is to fund creative projects that lead to social engagement or change.

Read more about PL in this article from Forbes.
 

NKU lands on list of top 50 schools for LGBTQ students


College Choice recently ranked the top 50 colleges and universities for LGBTQ students. Northern Kentucky University came in at no. 31 on the list.

The website examined schools that protect their LGBTQ students through policy inclusion, resources, services and LGBTQ curriculum. From there, it compared the institutions' academic reputation, student satisfaction, affordability and average annual salary of graduates to create the ranking.

NKU has the LGBTQ Student Ambassadors, and every October, the entire campus celebrates LGBTQ History Month. NKU also has an active student life — including many queer and trans clubs and organizations for students. Its progressive campus safety policies and procedures; inclusive and exhaustive healthcare system; support groups for LGBTQ students struggling with depression and/or anxiety; and its LGBTQ policy statements and institutional commitments.

See what other schools made the list.

 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center receives award for best exhibition


The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center recently received a number of awards from the Ohio Museums Association, including one for best exhibit for the 2016 ENSLAVED: A Visual Story of Modern Day Slavery.

The museum also received the Gold Award (the top prize) for the visual communication competition for The Rosa Parks Experience campaign, and Jesse Kramer, the museum's creative director, received the 2016 Emerging Professional Award.

ENSLAVED: A Visual Story of Modern Day Slavery featured images by world-renowned photographer Lisa Kristine that documented the lives of slaves and the freedom they never dreamed possible. The Rosa Parks Experience is the museum’s virtual reality experience that commemorates Rosa Parks’ historic demonstration.

Founded in 1976, the OMA is the leading advocate for connecting and empowering the state's museums and museum professionals through professional development, networking events and advocacy. Each year, OMA’s annual awards program honors outstanding individual and institutional achievements and visual communications.

To find out more about the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and its exhibits, click here.

 

Cincinnati considered the best place to buy a house in Ohio


Due to its low cost of housing and family friendly destinations, Cincinnati is considered the best city to buy a home in the state of Ohio.

Simplemost recently evaluated all 50 states and compiled a list of the country's best cities in each state in which to buy a house.

Compared to other Ohio cities, Cincinnati has a lower unemployment rate; the median household income is about $35,000, and the average home price is about $140,000.

To see the top 50 cities to live in in the U.S., click here.


 

New York Times does Cincinnati on a budget


The New York Times' "Frugal Traveler" section visits Cincinnati via a new report from Lucas Peterson, who takes in "a former boomtown that was once called the 'Paris of America' because of its inspired architecture and ambitious engineering projects."

"I discovered that Cincinnati has a complicated and fascinating history that bridges (quite literally) the Northern and Southern United States," he writes. "There are, of course, great opportunities for the budget-conscious traveler: gorgeous buildings, interesting museums, open-air markets and good food, including Cincinnati's famous chili."

Peterson tries Skyline in Clifton and Camp Washington Chili, spends time at Findlay Market and Museum Center at Union Terminal and experiences a transcendent moment at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

"There’s an odd quietness in the (slave) pen, which visitors are allowed to enter: an almost ghostly chill," he writes. "It's a potent piece of history, and one of the more impressive artifacts I've encountered in any museum, anywhere."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Greater Cincinnati ranked #9 among regions "where manufacturing is thriving"


Forbes Magazine says manufacturing in the U.S. has enjoyed a renaissance since 2009, gaining back 828,000 jobs since the recession. And the industrial heartland has been leading the charge, in sharp contrast to other areas of the economy.

Forbes has released its ranking of the 48 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 50,000 manufacturing positions, based on employment growth in the sector over the short-, medium- and long-term, going back to 2005, and factoring in momentum (whether growth is slowing or accelerating). Greater Cincinnati is ranked #9.

"Perhaps no sector in the U.S. economy generates more angst than manufacturing," Joel Kotkin writes in the list's introduction. "Over the past quarter century, manufacturing has hemorrhaged over 5 million jobs. The devastation of many regional economies, particularly in the Midwest, is testament to this decline. If the information sector has been the golden child of the media, manufacturing has been the offspring that we pity but can't comfortably embrace."

Yet over the period from 1997 to 2012, he continues, labor productivity growth in manufacturing is 3.3% per year, one-third higher than the rest of the economy. In addition, "a dollar of final demand for manufacturing generates $1.33 in output from other sectors of the economy, considerably higher than the multiplier for information ($0.80) and more than twice as high as such fields as retail trade ($0.66) and business services ($0.61). Other estimates place this impact far higher."

Forbes says manufacturing employment in Greater Cincinnati grew by 3.29 percent in 2015 and 11.92 percent from 2010 to 2015.

Read the full Forbes story here.
 

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Local startup Spatial among 12 international companies in auto mobility accelerator


The mobility accelerator operated by Boulder-Color.-based Techstars recently named Cincinnati startup Spatial as one of the 12 companies in its Techstars Mobility Class of 2016. Each is building automotive mobility technologies and services that enable people and goods to move around more freely, according to the announcement posted on Techstars' website.

"The quality of teams and companies applying this year has been incredible," writes Techstars Mobility Managing Director Ted Serbinski. "We saw a world-wide response with applications from 52 countries across 6 continents. There was a 44 percent increase in mobility-focused companies. Most impressive, 50 percent of the 2016 companies include founders with diverse backgrounds."

Spatial uses data from social media platforms to describe the feel of a neighborhood on maps, a big help to people planning trips to cities or areas they aren't familiar with. The startup was part of Ocean's accelerator class earlier this year, graduating in April.

As part of the Techstars Mobility Class, Serbinski says, Spatial will participate in a Sept. 8 demo day "where we expect over 1,000 people to come see and meet these 12 startups."

Techstars has increased its investment relationship with Cintrifuse in recent years and is partnering with Cintrifuse to present its annual FounderCon in Cincinnati in October.

Read the full Techstars blog post here.
 
202 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All
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