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Diversity : Cincinnati In The News

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How Cincinnati fares in analysis of U.S. bike & walk commuting

The League of American Bicyclists recently released its 2014 edition of “Where We Ride: An Analysis of Bicycling in American Cities,” a look at the growth of bicycle commuters based on new data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey. Topics covered include how all 50 states rank according to bicycle commuters as a share of all commuters, how cities with a high percentage of bicycle commuters compare to other cities in their regions and even numbers on the rate of growth among walking commuters.

The broad results show there was a modest increase of 0.5 percent from 2013 to 2014 in the percentage of bike commuters nationwide. That number has grown by 62 percent nationally since 2000.

Cincinnati, Ohio and Kentucky show up throughout the report, of course, with mixed results. The best news: Cincinnati is the third fastest growing city for bike commuting, with 350 percent growth in bike commuters between 2000 and 2014. Only Detroit and Pittsburgh grew faster.

Cincinnati ranks #31 among U.S. cities for percentage of commuter trips taken by bike (0.9 percent), which is about where the city sits in overall market size (#35). Portland, Ore. is #1.

In terms of overall share of commuting performed on bicycle, Ohio ranks 36 and Kentucky 43. Oregon is #1.

Interestingly, 6.4 percent of Cincinnati workers commuted by walking in 2014, which ranks ninth among U.S. cities in the 200,000-500,000 population range. Pittsburgh was first in that size category with 11 percent.

Read the full League of American Bicyclists report here.

When art fought the law in Cincinnati and art won

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Contemporary Arts Center's Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, The Perfect Moment, that resulted in obscenity charges against the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and ultimately their exoneration by a Hamilton County jury. Smithsonian Magazine does a good job recapping the 1990 events and trying to explain how Cincinnati — the arts community and the city in general — has evolved since then.

Writer Alex Palmer interviews Barrie and his lead defense attorney, Lou Sirkin, to provide memories of the 1990 events as well as current CAC Director Raphaela Platow and Curator Steven Matijcio for "what does it mean today" context.
"The case has left a positive legacy for the CAC, and for Barrie, who went on to help defend offensive song lyrics at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum," Palmer writes. "'People see the CAC as a champion of the arts,' says Matijcio. 'We're still always trying to be challenging and topical, to draw on work that's relevant and of the moment.'"

The CAC commemorates the 25th anniversary with a series of programs and exhibitions, starting with a "Mapplethorpe + 25" symposium Oct. 23-24.

Read the full Smithsonian Magazine story here.

Wired likes local project's use of video games to fight urban decay

Wired magazine took notice of local designer Giacomo Ciminello's use of video game play to help re-invigorate blighted spaces through his People’s Liberty grant project, Spaced Invaders. Soapbox was on hand Aug. 27 for the project's first public display in Walnut Hills.

"I like the idea of just 'spaced invaders' because that is literally what we are doing," Ciminello tells Wired. "We aren't destroying property, we aren't making permanent marks. We are having fun, and opening up people's eyes to possibility. Why is this parking lot here? Empty? … What does this neighborhood or community need and can it be in this space? That's the kind of dialogue we are hoping for."

Read the full Wired story here.

How Hamilton produced "drill rap" star Slim Jesus

Apparently Hamilton is home to an up-and-coming rap star who goes by the name Slim Jesus. The Atlantic's CityLab attempts to find out why a white rapper from small-town Ohio has a video with more than 1.5 million YouTube views (image from the video is above) and close to 16,500 "thumbs-up" as well as more than 7,000 "thumbs-down."

"His song 'Drill Time' has launched him into overnight celebrity status, in no small part to his gunshow spectacle, but also because of the power of social media," Brentin Mock writes. "There are plenty of blogs, listicles, and Reddit threads attempting to explain who Slim Jesus is. However, his hometown of Hamilton — the city where (President George W.) Bush dropped bombs on education and Iraq in the same speech (in 2002) — perhaps most deserves examination to understand how Slim Jesus came to be."

Among "the conditions that created Slim Jesus," Mock focuses on Ohio's vanishing manufacturing sector, which hit Hamilton especially hard, and the state's steady pro-firearms legislative march.

"While gun violence is often associated with black teens, it's not surprising to find such a huge arsenal of guns in the hands of the white, teenaged rapper," he writes. "He's a reflection of his city — which is 84 percent white and 22.9 percent poor — and a reflection of the values of the predominantly white National Rifle Association. Along with Slim Jesus, Ohio also produced Machine Gun Kelly, from Cleveland, a Rust Belt city that has recovered a bit better than Hamilton but is still in an economic rut."

Read the full CityLab story here.

Oyler School's role in transforming Lower Price Hill praised by national education leader

"Imagine an old, abandoned end unit row house that is tall, slender in build, and neglected in infrastructure," writes Martin J. Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, in The Huffington Post's education blog. "For many years it's been a crack house, filled with needles — a revolving door of drugs and criminal activity. The back of this house overlooks a local schoolyard, where neighborhood children and youth come to learn and play. The house stands in contrast to a beautiful rebuilt school and is a reminder of the challenges students, educators, families, and the community face daily."

Blank then describes how the house offered an opportunity to be part of the amazing transformation of Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati thanks to the reconstruction of Oyler Community Learning Center.

Titled "What Happens When a Crack House Becomes an Early Childhood Learning Center?" the blog post describes how Oyler leaders helped renovate the house to become a neighborhood pre-school center.

The Robert & Adele Schiff Early Learning Center opened late last year, expanding a program that Oyler began by housing it inside the school.

Public radio education reporter Amy Scott premiered her documentary film about the same Lower Price Hill experiment, Oyler, in May at the school. It's screening Thursday night at the 2015 Cincinnati Film Festival.

Read the full Huffington Post column here.

U.S. News ranks Ohio State as top area college, followed by IU and Miami

U.S. News & World Report is out with its latest college rankings, which the magazine suggests "provide an excellent starting point ... for families concerned with finding the best academic value for their money."

After the listings intro states, "The host of intangibles that makes up the college experience can't be measured by a series of data points," USN&WR does just that. And how do the data points add up for area schools?

In the "National Universities" category, Ohio State is the first area school at #52. Other area institutions include Indiana University at 75, Miami University 82, University of Dayton 108, University of Kentucky 129, Ohio University 135 and University of Cincinnati 140.

In the "Regional Universities" category, the Midwest features Xavier at #6 and Mount St. Joseph at 68. The South includes Thomas More at 53 and NKU 80.

In the "National Liberal Arts Colleges" category, the region's highest ranked school is Oberlin at 23, followed by Kenyon 25, Centre 45, Denison 55, Earlham 61 and Berea 67.

Forbes magazine released its own college rankings last month, with Miami, Indiana and Ohio State as the highest rated area schools as well, but in that order.

See the full U.S. News & World Report rankings here.

Cincinnati the cheapest of 24 major U.S. cities surveyed for living costs

Yahoo Finance has gathered statistics from the Economic Policy Institute's 2015 Family Budget Calculator to demonstrate, once and for all, that living in San Francisco and New York City is really expensive. The accompanying story suggests that Cincinnati might be a cheaper — and vastly superior (our interpretation) — alternative.

"Even if you're living on your own, expenses can add up," Yahoo Finance explains. "Especially in a big city."

The Economic Policy Institute gathered data in 618 metro areas throughout the the U.S. for several different family types, and Yahoo's story focused on the cost of living for a single person (one adult, zero children) in 24 major U.S. cities. Their numbers measure the annual cost of necessities for one adult to live a "modest lifestyle" by estimating the costs of housing, food, transportation, health care, other necessities and taxes; the numbers don't include savings or discretionary spending.

It costs over $43,500 per year for a single person to live in San Francisco and NYC, the two most expensive cities of the 24 surveyed. Cincinnati comes in as the cheapest, costing a single person $25,403 per year. Cleveland, San Antonio and Pittsburgh were just behind Cincinnati on the list.

Read the full Yahoo Finance story here.

"Choice amenities" like Washington Park are changing urban landscape across U.S.

Michael Gaughan, a director with the National Development Council, writes a column on the Governing Magazine web site today discussing how new ideas and players are coalescing to provide attractive options for the livability of cities, saying that's good news for economic development. He includes Washington Park on a short list of examples of urban projects centering on new forms of recreation and mobility that often have a blurry distinction.

"More recently, a new movement has taken hold that is creating an equally powerful set of amenities for today's city-dwellers," Gaughan writes. "A hallmark of this transformation has been an interdisciplinary approach in which transportation departments and public/private developers are as important to recreation as parks departments have long been. For economic-development professionals, this evolution requires further expansion in the definition of what constitutes an urban amenity as well as who should be recruited for growth partnerships."

Read the full Governing Magazine column here.

NYT Magazine chronicles Cincinnati Reds' long connection to Cuba

The New York Times Magazine has a photo story about the Cincinnati Reds' long connection to Cuban baseball, starting with a 1908 tour of Cuba and the debut of Cuban players on the Reds in 1911. The slide show includes information about Tony Perez, whose statue at Great American Ball Park will be unveiled this weekend, and ends with the team's three current Cubans: Raisel Iglesias, Aroldis Chapman and Brayan Pena.

"The Reds were one of the first National League teams to play in Cuba," the photo story says. "During a 1908 exhibition tour of the island, the Reds were sometimes outmatched by the local talent, and the rest of the baseball world took notice. Over the last century of baseball, the team has had consistent luck developing some of the major league's biggest Cuban stars."

See the New York Times slide show here.

47 local companies ranked on Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing private firms

The Business Courier reports on 47 Greater Cincinnati companies being ranked in this year's Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing privately held firms. Two local companies — United Installs in Erlanger and ePremium Insurance in Mason — make the more selective Inc. 500 list. In fact, ePremium Insurance ranks for the second year in a row.

The largest local private company on the list is RoundTower Technologies of Blue Ash with revenue of $131.5 million. It ranks #1,668 with "only" 244 percent growth over the past three years.

Read the Cincinnati Business Courier article here.

Could Cincinnati be a model for police reform nationwide?

Boston's public radio station discusses the recent spate of police shootings of unarmed African Americans by asking the question, "Could Cincinnati be a model for police reform nationwide?"

Website columnist Rich Barlow explains why Cincinnati is succeeding where other U.S. cities aren't.

"One place to look for answers, ironically, is Cincinnati," Barlow writes on WBUR.com. "Ironic, because that’s the city where a white cop stands accused of murdering unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose. But DuBose’s killer is a university cop, not a municipal one, and that’s important: The Cincinnati PD is a model for the sea change needed in policing.
"After race riots 14 years ago following an officer’s killing a black man, Cincinnati altered the way it policed and interacted with its black residents. A lengthy Atlantic article described how the key reform was something called community-oriented policing, which seeks to address problems leading to arrests before the arrests have to be made."

Read the full WBUR column here.

Miami, XU, UC and NKU ranked in Forbes' top 650 colleges

Forbes is out with its annual rankings of U.S. colleges and universities, focusing more than ever on the hot topic of a college degree's return on investment — which it says differentiates its rankings from U.S. News & World Report, among others.

Miami University was the top Cincinnati area college, ranking 167 overall, ahead of Xavier University at 315, University of Cincinnati at 381 and Northern Kentucky University at 626. Other notable area rankings include Indiana University at 112, Ohio State University at 155, University of Dayton at 220, University of Kentucky at 319 and Ohio University at 407.

"While the cost of U.S. higher education escalates, there’s a genuine silver lining in play," Caroline Howard writes in the intro to "America's Top Colleges Ranking 2015." "A growing number of colleges and universities are now focusing on student-consumer value over marketing prestige, making this a new age of return-on-investment education. This pivot is the result of intense public scrutiny on the substantial cost of a degree vs. long tail worth — the very heart of Forbes' definitive Top Colleges ranking, now in its eighth year."

Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity to rank the top 650 schools on what Howard says distinguishes is "our belief in 'output' over 'input.' We’re not all that interested in what gets a student into college, like our peers who focus heavily on selectivity metrics such as high school class rank, SAT scores and the like. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting out of college?"

Forbes' rankings score colleges on post-graduate success (32.5% of grade), student satisfaction (25%), student debt (25%), academic success (10%) and graduation rate (7.5%).

Read the full Forbes article and rankings here.

Roundup: Media coverage of Tensing indictment

Cincinnati is the latest U.S. city in the media crosshairs over a police shooting of an unarmed African-American citizen. Hamilton County's indictment of UC Officer Ray Tensing on murder charges for the killing of Samuel DuBose hinged directly on video from Tensing's body camera of the traffic stop that led to DuBose's death.

In case you want more information and perspectives, here's a roundup of local and national media coverage surrounding Tensing's indictment and police/community relationships in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Enquirer online section: Everything you need to know about the Samuel DuBose shooting

WCPO: How video differed from report of UC shooting, and why attorneys say it's crucial

P.G. Sittenfeld column at Huffington Post: Why white politicians should say black lives matter

New York Times editorial: This environment of death and distrust is a threat to the fabric of society and to democracy itself

Washington Post column: How the lack of police 'discretion' killed Samuel DuBose and Sandra Bland

CityLab: Police body cameras coming everywhere in 3 to 5 years

New York Times: Glare of video is shifting public's view of police

PBS: Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell talks about Cincinnati's changes in policing since 2001 and how Samuel DuBose's death has stirred up old feelings

MSNBC: How Cincinnati learned from riots in 2001

Christian Science Monitor: Cincinnati shooting tests 'blue wall of silence'

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy

Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.

How Cincinnati nailed the All Star Game

After a solid year of planning and publicity, the 2015 All Star Game has come and gone. What were the main impressions Cincinnati left on the MLB players and officials, the visitors and the media? Will there be any long-term benefits? And what did we residents ultimately get out of the experience?

It'll take months if not years to sort out the benefits, but two things are clear the day after the game: Cincinnati did a masterful job of planning and hosting the All Star Game, and we really lucked out with the weather. Every major outdoor event went off as planned, and even a last-minute replacement headliner for the free concert at Paul Brown Stadium turned lemons into lemonade.

Local organizers were surely dying a thousand deaths during Monday's and Tuesday's storms, but the Cincinnati presented during national TV segments was sunny, balmy and happy.

Here's a roundup of day-after media coverage:

8 ways Cincinnati rocked the All Star Game (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Fans, visitors impressed with Cincinnati's show (WVXU-FM)

All Star players impressed with Cincinnati and events (Local 12)

Cincinnati's All Star festivities a home run for visitors, locals (Business Courier)

9 lessons Cincinnati learned from the All Star Game (WCPO.com)

Alisha Perkins: I was fully prepared to not like Cincinnati, but I kind of fell in love with this place (Huffington Post)

Pete Rose drama plays out on baseball's biggest stage (New York Times)
154 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All
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