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Architecture + Design : Cincinnati In The News

231 Architecture + Design Articles | Page: | Show All

Oakley Square's transformation showcases importance of neighborhood greenspace


The businesses on Oakley Square surround a 350-foot linear park, Geier Esplanade, which is in the center of the traffic pattern. This design proved a unique challenge for the redesign, but now, the heart of the neighborhood is more pedestrian-friendly.

Over the years, the esplanade had shrunken to create more space for through traffic, which didn't support the original main street environment. The City of Cincinnati wanted to restore and enhance Oakley's business district, which serves as not only a transportation junction but also the economic and social heart of the neighborhood.

Pedestrian safety was an issue, especially at the six-point intersection at the northeast end of the square. The intersection had large turn lanes and confusing signage; for the recent redesign, streets were realigned, the intersection was simplified, traffic signals were upgraded and new crosswalks were created.

To read more about Oakley Square's redevelopment from the Congress for a New Urbanism, click here.
 


Documentary featuring new District 3 police headquarters airing on Dec. 24


A new film showcasing the redevelopment and sustainability efforts of the City of Cincinnati will air again on Dec. 24 at 6:30 p.m. on CET (PBS).

Filmmaker Laure Quinlivan documented the construction of the new Cincinnati Police District 3 West Side headquarters over two years. The building is the city's first LEED Platinum building, the first time including public art and the first time engaging citizens. The new police headquarters is also the first Net Zero Energy police station in the country. 

View the trailer here, and tune into the documentary on Dec. 24.
 

Cincy's 10 most beautiful neighborhoods all have unique identities


Ten Cincinnati neighborhoods have been recognized by Only in Your State as the city's most beautiful. 

Here are the neighborhoods and the reasons these spots are so iconically beautiful.
 
  • Loveland: historic downtown and bike trails
  • Mariemont: European-inspired central business district
  • Hyde Park: estate homes
  • Columbia-Tusculum: "painted ladies" and views of the river
  • Clifton: Gaslight District
  • Over-the-Rhine: new shops, restaurants, small businesses and murals
  • Northside: unique business district
  • Glendale: train that runs through the heart of it
  • Wyoming: historic homes and parks
  • Westwood: "neighborhood" feel and resurgent business district
Read more about these neighborhoods here
 

BLINK not the only draw in Cincinnati


This October brought BLINK to the Queen City, a free, walkable, light and art festival that spanned from The Banks to Findlay Market and included 60 large-scale installations and projections. Over one million people attended, putting it on the radar of people all over the region, and the country.

While in town for BLINK, travel blog Cool Hunting uncovered a myriad of other can't-miss options in town, including the 21c, Findlay Market, the Contemporary Arts Center, the Cincinnati Arts Museum, the Lucky Cat Museum, Taft's Ale House, brewery tours in Over-the-Rhine, the American Sign Museum, Rhinegeist's new restaurant, Music Hall and drinks at Sundry and Vice.

Click here to read more about Cool Hunting's four days of Cincinnati discovery.


 


Behind closed doors: Cincinnati's most beautiful restaurants


Many of Cincinnati's best restaurants are hidden behind unassuming doors. Only in Your State rounded up the top eight local spots that you have to see for yourself.
 
  • Boca
  • Sotto
  • Mita's
  • Restaurant L
  • Metropole
  • Taft's Ale House
  • The Mercer OTR
  • Abigail Street
Click here to see the photos.

 

Cincinnati named the most hipster city in the country


Hipster trends are popping up all over the place: craft coffee, craft beer, local art galleries, etc. Cincinnati has a plethora of all of these, and was recently recognized by Jetsetter.com as the most hipster city in America.

Cincinnati has 19th-century and Art Deco architecture, historic breweries and European-style neighborhoods. But we're also experiencing a cultural revival, with buzzy storefronts, boutique hotels, standout restaurants and hip bars cropping up all over the city. Jetsetter highlighted Over-the-Rhine, which is in the midst of an $80 million revitalization, has cool shops like MiCA 12/V, local art galleries and cafes.

Holtman’s Donuts has taken the city by storm, topping its donuts with maple bacon, cereal or coconut. The Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center is the first freestanding American museum designed by a woman (none other than Zaha Hadid), and it's full of cutting-edge photography, film and performance art; and downtown's 21c Museum Hotel features a free contemporary art gallery, rooftop bar and restaurant.

Read about the other six hipster cities here.
 

21c Cincinnati named top hotel in Midwest by Condé Nast Traveler


Condé Nast Traveler recently announced its 30th annual Readers’ Choice Awards, recognizing 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati as one of the best in the world. Each of 21c Museum Hotels’ seven properties received high honors, with 21c Cincinnati landing at the no. 5 spot on the Top Hotels in the Midwest list.

Five other 21c Museum Hotels were named as Top Hotels in the South, including 21c Lexington (No. 6), 21c Nashville (No. 15), 21c Louisville (No. 17), 21c Durham (No. 22) and 21c Bentonville (No. 37). The rankings are based on the quality of rooms, service, food and dining, location and overall design.

More than 300,000 readers submitted millions of ratings and tens of thousands of comments, voting on a record-breaking 7,320 hotels and resorts, 610 cities, 225 islands, 468 cruise ships, 158 airlines and 195 airports.

For more information about the awards, click here.
 


Music Hall renovations set the stage for NYC's Geffen Hall


The New York Philharmonic's performance space, David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, is in desperate need of renovations. But it just scrapped a $500 million gut renovation, unlike Cincinnati's Music Hall, which just underwent a $135 million renovation.

On Oct. 6, Music Hall reopened with much pomp and circumstance. The two-year renovation paid off — patrons are now "closer to the music," as the CSO's Louis Langrée put it.

Read the New York Times' article about how Cincy is leading the way for Geffen Hall's proposed transformation.

You can read our full Cincy Sets the Stage series about Music Hall's renovation here
 

Greater Cincinnati no. 1 metro area in sustainability


Site Selection released its 2017 Sustainability Rankings, which are driven by a unique index of factors. Ohio is the third most sustainable state in the U.S., and among U.S. metro areas, the Greater Cincinnati area landed itself at no. 1.

This ranking is in part because of companies like Procter & Gamble, which continues to pursue its own aggressive sustainability agenda. Recent green steps include investments in recycling and beneficial reuse that by 2020, will eliminate all manufacturing waste from P&G's global network of more than 100 production sites.

UC is also a leader in the sustainability game. The new $120 million Carl H. Lindner College of Business will be LEED Gold certified when it opens in 2019. Since 2004, UC has constructed six LEED-certified buildings, including the award-winning Morgans and Scioto student residence halls.

To see where other states, countries and metro areas ranked, click here.
 


BLINK: by the numbers


This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
 
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.
 

 


OTR named one of five Great Neighborhoods by the APA


Last week, the American Planning Association named Over-the-Rhine one of five Great Neighborhoods on its annual Great Places in America list. The list marks the kick-off for the APA’s National Community Planning Month celebration.

Like much of the city, OTR has undergone huge changes in the past 15 years, and it's now considered one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Planning efforts showcase the historic nature of OTR and will help preserve the neighborhood’s legacy.

As part of the distinction, Mayor John Cranley declared Oct. 4 “Over-the-Rhine ‘Great Neighborhood’ Day” in Cincinnati.

Through continued public-private partnerships and the ongoing support of the community’s residents, developers have been able to restore historic buildings like Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the former St. Paul's Evangelical Church (now home to Taft's Ale House); create community gathering spaces like Washington Park and Ziegler Park; and create new housing options all over OTR.

Along with OTR, APA also recognized Seward in Minneapolis; the Heart of Missoula; Uptown Greenwood, SC; and Pearl in San Antonio.

Click here to read more about APA's Great Places in America. 
 


UC's Crosley Tower considered one of nation's ugliest buildings


Cincinnati has a rich architectural history: some of its most historic buildings were designed by famed architect Samuel Hannaford, and residents are proud of its rich architectural history. Efforts continue to renovate and restore the city's gems, which is evident in the soon-to-reopen Music Hall and Union Terminal.

However, Crosley Tower at the University of Cincinnati was named one of the ugliest buildings in the U.S. by Architectural Digest. The magazine claims that the building looks like it's a single slab of concrete and would be a good home for a Disney villain. 

Crosley Tower isn't alone — click here to see the other seven buildings that made AD's list.
 

Cincy recognized as one of the top destinations for design this fall


Architectural Digest sought out the top five travel destinations this fall for those interested in design, and Cincinnati made the list. Other cities include Mexico City; Washington, D.C.; Shenzhen, China; and New York's Hudson Valley. 

October is a busy month for Cincinnati, with events like the first-ever BLINK festival (Oct. 12-15) and DesignBuildCincy (Oct. 28 & 29). Design-lovers can also appreciate the historic buildings like those designed by Samuel Hannaford (Music Hall, City Hall, the Cincinnati Observatory and the Mutual Building in NKY, just to name a few). 

AD suggests staying at the 21c Musuem Hotel and checking out the Contemporary Arts Center, which was designed by Zaha Hadid. 
 

District 3 police headquarters showcased in sustainability design magazine


The new, 39,600-square-foot, District 3 police headquarters that serves about 95,000 people form Price Hill to Riverside to Westwood was completed in 2015. It's the first LEED platinum and net zero police station in the world, and was recently featured in Net Zero Buildings magazine.

A net zero building means that the total amount of energy used by the building annually is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on site.

The old police station was split between two historic buildings, and was inefficient for many reasons. When designing the new station, the goal was threefold: Maintain building security, insure occupant comfort and create a welcoming space that enhances the relationship between the public and the police.

Community engagement with neighborhood committees factored into the design process, as well as public art within the building and on the surrounding site.

Messer Construction was the general contractor, and emersion DESIGN was the architect.

To read more about the new District 3 headquarters and what it means for sustainability design, click here.
 

Artichoke owners chosen as 2017 Impact Merchants by HomeWorld Business


Brad and Karen Hughes — the owners of Artichoke, Over-the-Rhine's only gourmet kitchen store — were chosen for this year's HomeWorld Business Impact Merchant awards.

The Hughes opened Artichoke in 2016 adjacent to Findlay Market, and not only does the couple stock every kitchen utensil and appliance you could possibly need, they also pay close attention to detail.

Artichoke's interior is asthetically pleasing, and is based on simple, modern elements of design. The store's inventory is kept in the basement of the small store rather than on the shelves, and everything down to the packaging of each product the Hughes carry is carefully considered.

The rest of the recipients are from big businesses like Target, Best Buy and Costco. Artichoke is the only locally-owned small business to make the list.

Read HomeWorld Business' full profile on the Hughes.
231 Architecture + Design Articles | Page: | Show All
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