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Architecture + Design : Cincinnati In The News

219 Architecture + Design Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincy recognized as one of the top destinations for design this fall


Architectural Digest sought out the top five travel destinations this fall for those interested in design, and Cincinnati made the list. Other cities include Mexico City; Washington, D.C.; Shenzhen, China; and New York's Hudson Valley. 

October is a busy month for Cincinnati, with events like the first-ever BLINK festival (Oct. 12-15) and DesignBuildCincy (Oct. 28 & 29). Design-lovers can also appreciate the historic buildings like those designed by Samuel Hannaford (Music Hall, City Hall, the Cincinnati Observatory and the Mutual Building in NKY, just to name a few). 

AD suggests staying at the 21c Musuem Hotel and checking out the Contemporary Arts Center, which was designed by Zaha Hadid. 
 

District 3 police headquarters showcased in sustainability design magazine


The new, 39,600-square-foot, District 3 police headquarters that serves about 95,000 people form Price Hill to Riverside to Westwood was completed in 2015. It's the first LEED platinum and net zero police station in the world, and was recently featured in Net Zero Buildings magazine.

A net zero building means that the total amount of energy used by the building annually is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on site.

The old police station was split between two historic buildings, and was inefficient for many reasons. When designing the new station, the goal was threefold: Maintain building security, insure occupant comfort and create a welcoming space that enhances the relationship between the public and the police.

Community engagement with neighborhood committees factored into the design process, as well as public art within the building and on the surrounding site.

Messer Construction was the general contractor, and emersion DESIGN was the architect.

To read more about the new District 3 headquarters and what it means for sustainability design, click here.
 

Artichoke owners chosen as 2017 Impact Merchants by HomeWorld Business


Brad and Karen Hughes — the owners of Artichoke, Over-the-Rhine's only gourmet kitchen store — were chosen for this year's HomeWorld Business Impact Merchant awards.

The Hughes opened Artichoke in 2016 adjacent to Findlay Market, and not only does the couple stock every kitchen utensil and appliance you could possibly need, they also pay close attention to detail.

Artichoke's interior is asthetically pleasing, and is based on simple, modern elements of design. The store's inventory is kept in the basement of the small store rather than on the shelves, and everything down to the packaging of each product the Hughes carry is carefully considered.

The rest of the recipients are from big businesses like Target, Best Buy and Costco. Artichoke is the only locally-owned small business to make the list.

Read HomeWorld Business' full profile on the Hughes.

Say goodbye to Cincinnati being just a "fly-over" city


Our beloved Queen City just landed itself among the pages of Southwest Airlines' in-flight monthly, Southwest: The Magazine.

The feature spread shows off everything that we know and love about our city, including its rich beer heritage; locally owned and nationally acclaimed restaurants; the Star Wars costume exhibit at the Cincinnati Museum Center; its many attractions, including the Reds, the Bengals, Findlay Market, King's Island and the zoo; its rich arts history (P.S. Did you see the first story in our series about Cincinnati's arts heritage?); and the much-anticipated, new design festival, BLINK.

If you're taking a Southwest flight this month, make sure to check out, or access it here.
 

People's Liberty grantees featured on national podcast


This week's episode of the popular Plural of You podcast featured two local People's Liberty grantees and authors of The Neighborhood Playbook.

The podcast described Joe Nikol and Kevin Wright as two Cincinnati-based planners who "wrote a field manual...to guide developers and residents alike toward a common development model, which they divided into five steps or 'plays.'”

"What I’ve learned from Kevin and Joe is that community development doesn’t have to be this enormous, out-of-reach process that we sometimes imagine it to be," says the podcast host. "There are certainly caveats, and we have to be willing to let go of our own ideas and compromise sometimes to see them grow. At least we have the steps now to get out and start something new."

Click here for the full-length Plural of You episode.

 

Hotel Covington named one of the best new hotels in the South


Hotel Covington opened just last fall, but it's already gaining national attention — it was recently named one of the best hotels in the American South by CNN.

In the early 1900s, John Roberts Coppin built Coppin's Department Store (1910-1977) in downtown Covington. City Hall used the building from 1990-2014, when it moved out to make way for Aparium Hotel Group and The Salyers Group to develop their 114-room hotel concept.

The building underwent a $22 million renovation, and also houses a restaurant, Coppin's, that serves up classic American comfort food. The restaurant recently opened a walk-up window for late-night customers.

Check out the other eight hotels that made CNN's list.

Visual aid: Age of Cincinnati buildings


Ever wondered which neighborhood has the oldest buildings in Cincinnati? This map, provided by CincyInsights, which is a real-time data representation program from the City of Cincinnati.

Submitted by a Cincinnati resident, this map shows a visual representation of the age of the city's buildings to show the historical progression of construction. It shows us what many Cincinnatians already know — that Over-the-Rhine is home to much of the city's historic building stock. But it also shows that just a few blocks south of OTR lies the majority of the city's new construction. 

This accompanying blog post from map creator Nathan Rooy provides more information about his map.

What other information can you gather from Rooy's map?

Beer, spirits and entrepreneurship breathing life back into OTR


Over-the-Rhine was founded over 150 years ago by German immigrants who loved their beer. Today, beer, spirits and an entrepreneurial spirit are redeveloping the neighborhood, one building at a time.

People like Molly Wellmann and Julia Petiprin, Stuart King and Ryan Rizzo are bringing their own flare to Japp's and Sundry and Vice, respectively. They're taking Cincinnati back to its pre-Prohibition roots and re-introducing residents to what built the city: beer and booze.

Along the way, these entrepreneurs are taking dilapidated buildings and renovating them into bars, breweries, restaurants and eclectic shops that are scattered throughout OTR.

There's a lot to still be done in the neighborhood, but check out how far it's come.

Travel + Leisure plans perfect three-day weekend in Cincinnati


Travel + Leisure lays out three days of must-sees, must-dos and must-eats for tourists in Cincinnati, including exploring spots in downtown, Over-the-Rhine and Northern Kentucky.

During the day, take in art at the Contemporary Arts Center or take a Cincinnati Brewery Tour to see the underground lager tunnels. Hop on the streetcar or rent a Cincy Red Bike to get around and see the sights. Food highlights include dinner at Mita's and Sotto; breakfast at Maplewood Kitchen and Bar; drinks at Taft's Ale House or the 21c rooftop bar; and donuts at Holtman's.

To see the full three-day travel plan, click here.

Cincinnati one of the best cities for vintage homebuyers


TV shows like This Old House and Fixer Upper have inspired homeowners to purchase older, outdated homes. They're looking for that perfect house to flip, and Cincinnati has plenty of turn-of-the-century options.

Much of Cincinnati's housing stock is from the mid- to late-1800s, and although many of those houses have received updates like new roofs, electric and plumbing over the years, there is still so much potential to make these houses your own.

Apartment Theory recently compiled a list of its top 10 cities to purchase a "vintage" home, and Cincinnati came in at no. 9, with the average home price of $170,000.

To see what other cities are on the list, click here.
 

Cincinnati considered the best place to buy a house in Ohio


Due to its low cost of housing and family friendly destinations, Cincinnati is considered the best city to buy a home in the state of Ohio.

Simplemost recently evaluated all 50 states and compiled a list of the country's best cities in each state in which to buy a house.

Compared to other Ohio cities, Cincinnati has a lower unemployment rate; the median household income is about $35,000, and the average home price is about $140,000.

To see the top 50 cities to live in in the U.S., click here.


 

21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati tops the list of Ohio's best hotels


U.S. News & World Report ranked the state's top hotels, based on awards, expert recommendations and user ratings. Downtown's 21c Museum Hotel topped the list.

Open since 2012, 21c is home to a free, 24-hour contemporary art gallery and Metropole restaurant (named in honor of the Metropole Hotel that used to be located at the site) and a rooftop bar. The Cincinnati hotel is just one of seven 21c hotels in the country — others are located in Bentonville, Ark., Durham, NC, Lexington, Louisville, Oklahoma City and Nashville.

The 21c came in at no. 1 on USN's list of Best Ohio Hotels, with three other Cincinnati hotels — the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, The Cincinnatian and The Westin — making the top 10.

See the list of Ohio's top 15 best hotels here.

 

Five Cincinnati high schools named most beautiful in the state


Five Cincinnati schools made Aceable's list of most beautiful high schools in the state.

Withrow University High School in Hyde Park came in at no. 1. It was designed by Frederick W. Garber, and features a 114-foot clock tower and arched bridge. 

Other Cincinnati schools were:To see the full list of 28 of Ohio's most beautiful high schools, click here.
 

Brent Spence Bridge causes traffic jams downtown on both sides of the river


Rush hour in Cincinnati is the worst, especially if you're trying to cross the Brent Spence Bridge from either side of the river. It seems that no matter the time of day, the I-75 at I-74 and the I-75/I-71 at I-275 interchanges are always congested.

The Brent Spence Bridge, which is the cause of those traffic jams, recently made American Transporation Research Institute's list of top 100 bottlenecks in the country, coming in at no. 35 and no. 84, respectively.

Since 2002, the ATRI has collected and processed GPS data from trucks to help support the Federal Highway Administration's Freight Performance Measures initiative, which collects and monitors key performance measures of the country's freight transportation system.

See the full list of the country's worst 100 bottleneck interchanges here.





 

Cincinnati and Covington both make Travel + Leisure's list of best places to travel


Travel + Leisure recently named its top 50 travel destinations in the world, and Cincinnati and Covington both made the list because of the investment made by developers and the community to reinvigorate the region.

Cincinnati's must-see destinations include Over-the-Rhine and Union Terminal, and reasons to visit in the near future include Music Hall and Ziegler Park, both after renovations are completed, of course.

Locations in Covington include the newly opened Hotel Covington, which is in a former department store.

See the full list of destinations here.
 
219 Architecture + Design Articles | Page: | Show All
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