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Branding + Design : Cincinnati In The News

19 Branding + Design Articles | Page: | Show All

Please Cincinnati jumping on pink trend


The color Millennial Pink is all over the place, from social media to food. It's a shade that restaurants are embracing, including Cincinnati's own Please.

Inside, customers can find locally made light-pink ceramic bowls, pink wine books and checkbooks and Please's Instagram-famous pink-flecked bathroom tile, which was handpainted by Chef Ryan Santos and his girlfriend, Jessie.

Check out other pink restaurant trends here.
 

BLINK: by the numbers


This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
 
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.
 

 


DAAP connection pays off for UCLA professor


Casey Reas, professor of design media arts at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, has roots in Cincinnati: he's a graduate of UC's DAAP. His DAAP connections have landed him work with The National, an alt-rock band. 

Reas met The National's bassist, Scott Devendorf, and singer Matt Berninger when they were all graphic design students at DAAP — he even played drums for them, once upon a time.

The National just released its seventh album, "Sleep Well Beast," and Reas helped create four music videos for songs on the album. He used an open-source programming language called Processing, which he helped co-create, to make the videos.

Along with music videos, Reas' work has been exhibited in art galleries and projected onto buildings all over the globe.

To read more about Reas' process for creating The National's music videos, click here.
 

Nine Cincy restaurants are experts at the social media game


Illumen Media recently examined the social media accounts of 100 Greater Cincinnati restaurants, and came up with nine whose social marketing and online customer interaction are on-point.
 
  • Buzzed Bull Creamery: The relatively new alcoholic ice cream shop posts photos of its food, which sells — both the food and the business. Plus, they regularly interact with their customers on all social media platforms. @buzzedbullcreamery
  • Mac Shack and other 4EG-owned restaurants: This new restaurant concept is constantly changing its menu, and its social media game. @macshackclifton
  • Grand Central Deli: This New York-style deli has everything: a great concept, great food, strong graphics and excellent digital marketing. Everything ties back to the 1920s vibe. @gcdeli
  • Mac's Pizza Pub: This bar/pizza joint manages social media for all four of its locations, with a separate social presence for each spot. No matter the location, they're always promoting the game of the day and their events. @macspizzapub
  • Arnold's Bar & Grill: As the oldest tavern in town, it's had to adapt to the changing digital landscape. Event updates and unique local partnerships consistently receive high audience engagement. @arnolds_cincinnati
  • Bard's Burgers: A small, single-location dive in Covington that posts multiple times a day. They've created a community around their restaurant and regularly feature customers and competitions. @bardsburgers
  • Injoy Street Food: As a mobile food stand, digital marketing is super important. The images place Injoy's colorful food front-and-center, and their social channels consistently update customers on where to find them. @injoystreetfood
  • Court Street Lobster Bar: A one-of-a-kind concept in Cincy, Court Street Lobster uses that to its advantage. Specials and regular updates are super important too. @courtstlobster
  • Che: This Argentinian spot frequently changes its menu, and its social media accounts let customers know to come get its limited-time offers. @che_cincinnati
To read more about the restaurants that are playing the digital game right and for some takeaways from each, click here.
 

District 3 police headquarters showcased in sustainability design magazine


The new, 39,600-square-foot, District 3 police headquarters that serves about 95,000 people form Price Hill to Riverside to Westwood was completed in 2015. It's the first LEED platinum and net zero police station in the world, and was recently featured in Net Zero Buildings magazine.

A net zero building means that the total amount of energy used by the building annually is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on site.

The old police station was split between two historic buildings, and was inefficient for many reasons. When designing the new station, the goal was threefold: Maintain building security, insure occupant comfort and create a welcoming space that enhances the relationship between the public and the police.

Community engagement with neighborhood committees factored into the design process, as well as public art within the building and on the surrounding site.

Messer Construction was the general contractor, and emersion DESIGN was the architect.

To read more about the new District 3 headquarters and what it means for sustainability design, click here.
 

Artichoke owners chosen as 2017 Impact Merchants by HomeWorld Business


Brad and Karen Hughes — the owners of Artichoke, Over-the-Rhine's only gourmet kitchen store — were chosen for this year's HomeWorld Business Impact Merchant awards.

The Hughes opened Artichoke in 2016 adjacent to Findlay Market, and not only does the couple stock every kitchen utensil and appliance you could possibly need, they also pay close attention to detail.

Artichoke's interior is asthetically pleasing, and is based on simple, modern elements of design. The store's inventory is kept in the basement of the small store rather than on the shelves, and everything down to the packaging of each product the Hughes carry is carefully considered.

The rest of the recipients are from big businesses like Target, Best Buy and Costco. Artichoke is the only locally-owned small business to make the list.

Read HomeWorld Business' full profile on the Hughes.

Say goodbye to Cincinnati being just a "fly-over" city


Our beloved Queen City just landed itself among the pages of Southwest Airlines' in-flight monthly, Southwest: The Magazine.

The feature spread shows off everything that we know and love about our city, including its rich beer heritage; locally owned and nationally acclaimed restaurants; the Star Wars costume exhibit at the Cincinnati Museum Center; its many attractions, including the Reds, the Bengals, Findlay Market, King's Island and the zoo; its rich arts history (P.S. Did you see the first story in our series about Cincinnati's arts heritage?); and the much-anticipated, new design festival, BLINK.

If you're taking a Southwest flight this month, make sure to check out, or access it here.
 

Well-known Cincinnati brands named to list of top 500 brands


Ten Cincinnati brands, including Fifth Third Bank, Kroger, Macy's, P&G and six P&G brands, made Brand Finance's list of top 500 international brands.

Brand Finance publishes its list every year, and at the top of this year's list is Google. It edged out Apple, which was no. 1 in 2016, for the top spot. Gillette is the top ranking local company, coming in at no. 54. Other local companies and their rankings are as follows:

#73: Pantene
#95: Kroger
#124: Macy's
#125: Head and Shoulders
#149: Tide/Ariel
#190: Olay
#239: P&G
#281: Fifth Third Bank
#389: Cintas Corp.

All of the above companies, except Macy's and P&G, jumped up in ranking from the 2016 list.

Check out all 500 companies and their ranking here.
 

American Sign Museum's CoSign project expanding to Iowa City


CoSign provided new signs to local businesses in Northside and Covington, and now it's launching nationally. Its first stop: Iowa City.

The program pairs business owners with local artists and professional sign manufacturers to design, create and install new signs for the business' storefronts. CoSign helps create a sense of place, and adds vibrancy to neighborhood business districts.

CoSign launched in Northside in 2012, and crossed the river to Covington in 2014. Iowa City's new signs will be installed and unveiled in August during MidWestOne Bank's "Rock the Chalk" event. 

To read more about why the American Sign Museum chose Iowa City, click here.

Landor's recent rebranding of City of Covington receives national attention


Japanese publication, +81, released its third-ever branding edition in December. It focused on the appealing visual design of logos, signs, packaging, shopping bags, print media, websites, smaller galleries, shops, hotels, restaurants, cafes, web media and other local businesses.

It even showcased the city-wide rebranding of the City of Covington, which was done by local design firm Landor.

See the Q&A with Landor's creative director, Joe Napier, which is shared here. See the roundup of +81's branding favorites here.

Under Armour deals show how much money UC athletics miss by not being in major conference


The New York Times reports on a new equipment/shoe/jersey contract signed by Under Armour with UCLA that breaks the record for the largest college sponsorship deal ever — the fifth time in the past two years the record has been broken.

Under Armour will pay UCLA’s athletic department $280 million in cash and apparel over 15 years, an average of $18.7 million per year. It extends a trend of rapidly escalating contracts as three sportswear companies — Under Armour, Nike and Adidas — seek greater footholds in the lucrative college sports industry.

The Times story explains that the three companies are focusing their big dollars on high-profile sports programs in the so-called Power 5 conferences, including Ohio State ($16.7 million/year), Michigan ($15.8 million/year) and Texas ($16.8 million/year). It also mentions that Under Armour signed an agreement with the University of Cincinnati, not in a Power 5 conference, worth $5 million/year.

The Enquirer has written extensively about UC's efforts to join the Big 12 Conference, one of the Power 5 that's headed by Texas and Oklahoma.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers


The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.
 

Cincinnati's marketing efforts a "best practices" model for collaboration


Andrew Levine writes about "marketing places" for Forbes, and his most recent article discussed how successful cities find ways for their two main marketing organizations — the convention and visitors bureau and the economic development agency —  to work together to increase investment in the city.

Levine suggests five ways the two marketing organizations should collaborate and uses Cincinnati as one of his "best practices" examples.

"Cincinnati is a good example of collaboration," he writes. "In May 2014, the Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, REDI Cincinnati and half a dozen major arts organizations in the region led a ten-day mission to New York City (titled 'Cincy in NYC'). Amid performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and the Joyce Theatre, the group connected with meeting planners, site selection consultants, corporate executives, travel/business media and past Cincinnati residents. It was a tour de force for the community."

Read the full Forbes article here.
 

Get an M.B.A. from Indiana University if you want to work at P&G


Media outlets love to do splashy high school and college graduation stories at this time of the year, and The New York Times is no exception. Today's Education Life section has a story about how to choose the right university for your M.B.A. degree, which The Times says "has clearly become a commodity."

"Conventional wisdom will tell you that Harvard is for Fortune 500 jobs, Wharton for Wall Street, Kellogg for marketing and Insead for multinational entities," the story continues. "There's truth to some of it, but times change, and so do employers' recruiting preferences."

If you want to work at Procter & Gamble, for instance, you should enroll at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

"P&G clearly has a thing for Kelley," the story says. "The school is its biggest source of brand managers. Of the 172 Kelley alumni there, the most senior is Marc S. Pritchard, the chief brand officer."

Read the full story here.
 

Rockfish's Dave Knox featured in AdAge "40 Under 40"


Advertising Age magazine is out with its "40 Under 40" list of the top rising talent in the U.S. advertising community that features Rockfish Chief Marketing Officer Dave Knox, 34.

"This year's class of achievers have many varied accomplishments, but they all share one trait," the special section introduction says. "They are smart forward-thinkers who will be driving the business for years to come."

Ad Age makes note of Knox's work at Procter & Gamble, his launch role with The Brandery, his prized possessions and his teenage run-in with a wooden fence.

Read the full list here.
 

Frameri lenses attract Jay Z's online attention


Frameri founder and CEO Konrad Billetz talks about his company's popular interchangeable eyewear lenses with Life+Times, Jay Z's digital home covering art, sports, music, fashion and culture. He also discusses the Over-the-Rhine startup's future in the wake of his recognition as one of Forbes magazine's "30 Under 30" and why Cincinnati was the right place to launch Frameri.

"Cincinnati has to be one of most creative places I’ve ever experienced," Billetz tells Life+Times. "Being in Cincinnati has really helped us significantly. The entire community of designers, photographers, and creatives in general have been really supportive of us. Everyone wants to help and contribute to our mission, so we end up getting a lot of creative work either significantly discounted or free. Thank you Cincy!"

Read the full interview here.
 

Cincinnatians among Forbes "30 Under 30" changing the world


Forbes magazine is out with its annual "30 Under 30" list of young folks making a mark and changing the world. This year's list has a total of 600 millennials in 20 different categories (art & style, venture capital, consumer tech, music, etc.) — so 30 people in each.

A number of present and past Cincinnatians have a presence on the lists, many of them running startups developed through The Brandery. Konrad Billetz, CEO of Frameri eyeglass startup in Over-the-Rhine, was named among the leaders in manufacturing & industry, while Mayor John Cranley's director of external affairs, Daniel Rajaiah, made the law & policy list; he heads up Cranley's high-profile Task Force on Immigration. The Business Courier has a roundup of other Cincinnati connections to the lists.

Read the Forbes "30 Under 30" section here.
 

Cincinnati one of 8 candidates for "next Silicon Valley"

Cincinnati is one of eight U.S. cities identified as potential "next Silicon Valleys" in a Huffington Post report on new destinations for "burgeoning techies" that was produced in conjunction with Citi Group. Cincinnati "may not seem like the next tech hub from the outside, but it actually is exactly where major investors are flocking," the piece says. It also touts the work The Brandery has done to lead the startup community here, referencing the glowing 2013 profile of the organization at Entrepreneur.com. Read more here.
 
19 Branding + Design Articles | Page: | Show All
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