| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Cincinnati In The News

1777 Articles | Page: | Show All

Streetcars: If you build it, will they come?


Slow to build and expensive to operate, streetcars could be the most maligned mode of transportation in America, Governing Magazine says in its June issue, but cities keep building them.

This could be a banner year for streetcar openings, Daniel Vock writes, with a total of eight streetcar projects opening or about to come online, including five in cities with no previous service: Cincinnati; Detroit; Kansas City, Mo.; St. Louis; and Washington, D.C.

"What generally distinguishes streetcars from light rail is that streetcars are smaller, travel in traffic, have shorter routes and make more frequent stops," he writes. "Light rail is built to move people between neighborhoods, while streetcars typically help people get around within neighborhoods. Although the distinctions may seem small, they help explain why streetcars seem to get a lot more criticism than light rail projects, even though both have proliferated rapidly in recent years."

The most emulated streetcar system in the country is Portland’s, Vock says, and a "pilgrimage to Portland is virtually a prerequisite for any city leader serious about building a streetcar system at home. Cincinnati’s delegation has visited Portland 39 times because it’s an example of how a streetcar can both improve transportation and create a vibrant neighborhood out of an overlooked industrial area."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Walkable neighborhoods in U.S. cities are both wealthier and more highly educated


Urbanist Richard Florida writes in CityLab about a new report from the George Washington University School of Business regarding the effects of walkable places on the wealth and equity of U.S. metro areas. Cincinnati is rated #18 of the 30 metros studied and is ranked in the "lower-middle walkable urbanism" grouping, the second lowest of four tiers.

Florida explains that the report ranks walkability for America’s 30 largest metros using data on 619 walkable urban neighborhoods based on their high walk scores and large concentrations of office and/or retail space. It then examines the connection between metro walkability and factors like economic development (based on GDP per capita), educational attainment (the share of adults with college degrees) and social equity (based on housing and transportation costs, as well as the number of jobs near a given residence).

"While walkable neighborhoods occupy only one percent of land mass across the 30 largest metros, they account for the majority of office and multi-family rental development," Florida writes. "Between 2010 and 2015, the market shares of walkable urban places increased in all 30 metros, with 27 metros seeing their growth double since 2010."

The top-ranked tier of walkable cities includes (in order) New York City; Washington, D.C.; Boston; Chicago; San Francisco; and Seattle. Other cities ranked in the same tier as Cincinnati are Cleveland, Detriot, Houston, Miami, Los Angeles, Kansas City and St. Louis.

Read the full CityLab story here.
 

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Local startup Spatial among 12 international companies in auto mobility accelerator


The mobility accelerator operated by Boulder-Color.-based Techstars recently named Cincinnati startup Spatial as one of the 12 companies in its Techstars Mobility Class of 2016. Each is building automotive mobility technologies and services that enable people and goods to move around more freely, according to the announcement posted on Techstars' website.

"The quality of teams and companies applying this year has been incredible," writes Techstars Mobility Managing Director Ted Serbinski. "We saw a world-wide response with applications from 52 countries across 6 continents. There was a 44 percent increase in mobility-focused companies. Most impressive, 50 percent of the 2016 companies include founders with diverse backgrounds."

Spatial uses data from social media platforms to describe the feel of a neighborhood on maps, a big help to people planning trips to cities or areas they aren't familiar with. The startup was part of Ocean's accelerator class earlier this year, graduating in April.

As part of the Techstars Mobility Class, Serbinski says, Spatial will participate in a Sept. 8 demo day "where we expect over 1,000 people to come see and meet these 12 startups."

Techstars has increased its investment relationship with Cintrifuse in recent years and is partnering with Cintrifuse to present its annual FounderCon in Cincinnati in October.

Read the full Techstars blog post here.
 

Mortar turns locals into entrepreneurs in Cincinnati's gentrifying economy


Mortar's nine-week business development program is explained and celebrated in Yes! Magazine, a nonprofit, ad-free online and print publication offering tools for citizen engagement and stories about real people working for a better world.

While Mortar is open to all, Araz Hachadourian writes, the majority of its students are low-income women — like Jasmine Ford, who is featured in the story. After going through the Mortar program and raising funds through a Kiva campaign, Ford is planning to open a storefront bakery, Jazzy Sweeties, in Walnut Hills.

"The (Mortar) idea sprung from founders Derrick Braziel and Allen Woods, who live in Cincinnati’s historic Over-the-Rhine neighborhood," Hachadourian writes. "Once a working-class neighborhood made up mostly of German immigrants, the area was later populated by African Americans arriving during the Great Migration. Most businesses then were bars and small shops.

"Over the years, tech firms moved in and more than $843 million was invested in Over-the-Rhine and the surrounding downtown area, bringing an onslaught of development and new residents. Braziel says the neighborhood still has small businesses, 'but they’re serving a different demographic now.'"

"A lot of the entrepreneurs that we work with operate out of the underground cash economy," Braziel says. "They’re running businesses out of their living room or they’re doing business out of their trunk or they’re hustling in some way, shape, or form. There’s talent all around, what’s lacking is the know-how."

Read the full Yes! Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus to use high-tech tools to fight blight


Next City explores how the Motor City Mapping project, a citywide effort to create a comprehensive property dashboard in Detroit, is now expanding to Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus. Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

"The Detroit Land Bank Authority used the data to make decisions about which houses to save versus tear down," Lee Chilcote writes. "Officials also inventoried vacant and occupied properties for the first time, concentrating their efforts on tearing down vacant homes and preventing residents who are behind on their taxes from losing their homes."

The same technology is coming to Ohio thanks to a $1 million grant from JPMorgan Chase to the Western Reserve Land Conservancy that will allow the agency to create property dashboards for Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus. WRLC will work with Detroit-based Loveland Technologies, which developed the Motor City Mapping project.

Loveland founder and CEO Jerry Paffendorf says the technology has been a game changer for Detroit because it's "the most accurate thing that exists as far as getting a look at occupancy, vacancy and condition" of properties.

"With information in a single, easy-to-use interface that is updated in real-time, Detroit residents can get a much more accurate picture of the condition of their neighborhoods," the story says, which will be the same for Cincinnati neighborhoods.

Read the full Next City story here.
 

Avondale program shows how the arts contribute to creating more equitable places


Local arts leader Margy Waller has published a report about her painting project in Avondale on Americans for the Arts' ArtsBlog. It's her fifth blog post in 2016 related to her involvement with the organization's New Community Visions Initiative, a two-year effort to explore the role of community-based arts enabling organizations, funders, cultural institutions and artists in shaping the future of local arts in the U.S.

Waller's new blog post asks how the arts can contribute to creating more equitable places and offers her Avondale experience as an example of success.

"Leaders at two of the area hospitals seem to recognize the damage done to the neighborhood (by large institutions replacing homes with office buildings and parking lots) and are looking for ways to connect with residents, bridging and bonding with the community, creating a stronger place for all," she writes. "These leaders called for a partner to create an experience, having in mind something like the ArtWalks — community inspired and co-created crosswalk murals — we’ve created in other neighborhoods."

The resulting painting project at Gabriel's Place, Waller says, "might seem a small thing. But, no. Co-creating the art is a major happiness element, enhancing quality of life and connecting the neighborhood residents to people working at the encroaching institutions. Recognizing the damage done, the racist and privileged actions over decades, is large."

Read Margy Waller's full blog post here.
 

Japp's recognized by Esquire as one of the "best bars in America"


Molly Wellmann and her Japp's establishment on Main Street get high praise from Esquire Magazine's David Wondrich, who includes the Over-the-Rhine gem on his list of the 18 best bars in America.

Wondrich writes about the revolution he's witnessed over 11 years as Esquire's Drinks Correspondent, where most U.S. cities are now supporting craft cocktail bars that are full.

"People are paying double to drink in them, and they're not outraged," he writes. "They're coming back, over and over. They're putting their phones away (well, mostly), forgetting about the game, doing their best to act sober. (In my years of visiting these joints, I've rarely seen anybody visibly intoxicated — tipsy, sure; drunk, uncool.) The bartenders, their mustachioed, inked hipsterdom aside, are generally studious and hardworking (if perhaps too devoted to making things by hand that really don't need to be). All of this while the media and the political class are hyperventilating about the irreparable decline of America."

Wondrich suggests getting a Cool Jules at Japp's, "a gin-and-port stunner." Unless it's Tiki night, "in which case, pick something rummy from the chalkboard."

Read the full Esquire Magazine list here.
 

Under Armour deals show how much money UC athletics miss by not being in major conference


The New York Times reports on a new equipment/shoe/jersey contract signed by Under Armour with UCLA that breaks the record for the largest college sponsorship deal ever — the fifth time in the past two years the record has been broken.

Under Armour will pay UCLA’s athletic department $280 million in cash and apparel over 15 years, an average of $18.7 million per year. It extends a trend of rapidly escalating contracts as three sportswear companies — Under Armour, Nike and Adidas — seek greater footholds in the lucrative college sports industry.

The Times story explains that the three companies are focusing their big dollars on high-profile sports programs in the so-called Power 5 conferences, including Ohio State ($16.7 million/year), Michigan ($15.8 million/year) and Texas ($16.8 million/year). It also mentions that Under Armour signed an agreement with the University of Cincinnati, not in a Power 5 conference, worth $5 million/year.

The Enquirer has written extensively about UC's efforts to join the Big 12 Conference, one of the Power 5 that's headed by Texas and Oklahoma.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Over-the-Rhine is Cincinnati's booming foodie neighborhood


The Chicago Tribune's travel section features a nice guide to Over-the-Rhine dining options, saying, "Eating in the so-called OTR starts — but doesn't necessarily stop — in the 1300 block of Vine Street, which has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past decade. You can do breakfast, lunch and dinner without leaving the block."

Spots highlighted include Holtman's Donuts (the story features a photo of staffer DeShawn Ashley holding a tray of donuts), The Eagle, Pontiac BBQ, Quan Hapa, Graeter's and Findlay Market.

Read the full Chicago Tribune story here.
 

Brent Spence Bridge an "infrastructure emergency," now what?


The Hill political newspaper website leads off its take on the top five "infrastructure emergencies" across the U.S. with the Brent Spence Bridge, which it says is responsible for moving 4 percent of gross national product.

"Advocates for investing in the nation's infrastructure are hesitant to single out certain projects as deserving priority over others, arguing that sustained funding and attention is needed equally across the board," the story opens. "But there are some crumbling structures threatening both the economy and public safety that are just too urgent not to point out."

That's not news in Greater Cincinnati, where finding a replacement for the aging, overcrowded highway bridge has been a quixotic journey for corporate, government and community leaders for years. Design concepts were announced in 2010, but Ohio, Kentucky and federal political leaders can't agree on funding sources or methods.
 
"Some transportation planners are calling on officials not only to rehabilitate the bridge but to construct a new one alongside it," The Hill writes. "Every year of delay in the start of construction costs the taxpayers nearly $75 million per year in inflation, according to the Ohio Department of Transportation."

President Obama visited the Brent Spence Bridge in 2011 as part of a broader push for infrastructure investments, saying, "It's in such poor condition, it's functionally obsolete."

Read the full story from The Hill here.
 

Cincinnati continues to add population, says Census Bureau report


Cincinnati continues to add residents, although slowly, according to 2015 Census Bureau estimates of U.S. cities' populations.

The city's 2015 population is estimated at 298,550 — a slight increase over the 2014 estimate of 298,041. It was the fourth straight year of population increases in the city, according to the Census Bureau.

Seven of the 10 fastest growing U.S. cities are in Texas and all are below 200,000 population. The average year-over-year change for all cities with 100,000 or more residents was +1 percent.

Read the full Governing Magazine story and access the full Census Bureau report here.
 

Cincinnati and Columbus have recovered recession job losses, Cleveland not so much


Cincinnati and Columbus have regained the jobs each metro area lost during the 2007-09 recession, says a United States Conference of Mayors' report based on Labor Department and other government data. Cleveland won't recover all its recession-era job losses for nearly two more years.

The three metro areas represent Ohio's largest labor markets, each with more than 1 million jobs.

"Though the Cleveland area lags its large metro counterparts in recovering jobs, it will bounce back before some other areas in the state," Olivera Perkins writes in The Cleveland Plain Dealer. "For example, the Dayton and Toledo areas aren't projected to recover their lost jobs until after 2021."

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 

Hotel Covington named one of South's five hottest new boutique hotels


The New York Times Travel section has a guide to "A New Crop of Boutique Hotels in the South," including one that isn't even open yet: Hotel Covington. The other four are in New Orleans, East Nashville, Richmond and Marfa, Tex.

The story's theme is "Five one-of-a-kind boutique destinations that favor authentic, highly localized design." Hotel Covington is lauded for "vintage free-standing clothing racks (that) pay homage to the location’s past (as a department store). The gastro pub, Coppin’s, will source local and regional ingredients and feature Southern classics including fried chicken, country ham and black-eyed peas. And this summer the spacious patio will host pop-up bars, movie nights and Sunday suppers."

Soapbox's March 15 update on Hotel Covington's progress is here.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Oyler School a good example of how "community schools" help improve student outcomes


A blog post from the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) says that more and more cities are trying community schools that wrap health, dental, therapeutic and family support services around existing schools to try to mitigate the effects of poverty and thereby improve students’ learning and life prospects.

"This idea is not new," Paul Hill writes. "Its modern incarnation started in Cincinnati in the early 2000s and has now spread to New York City and Philadelphia."

Hill praises Oyler School in Lower Price Hill as "the great community schools exemplar in Cincinnati," saying anyone who visits "is sure to be moved and impressed."

Martin Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, praised Oyler School last fall on The Huffington Post.

The Center on Reinventing Public Education is a research and policy analysis center at the University of Washington Bothell developing systemwide solutions for K–12 public education.

Read the full CRPE blog post here.
 
1777 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts