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Uptown : Cincinnati In The News

287 Uptown Articles | Page: | Show All

UC students test dive mechanical dolphin tails

University of Cincinnati's School of Architecture and Interior Design created and tested prosthetic tails in the Florida Keys. The mechanical foot fins allow swimmers to move like a dolphin and swim twice as fast as an Olympic swimmer. The "Retail Design" course linked design students with entrepreneurs and it will be presented at an international design conference in August.

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A 'Best' hospital for Cystic Fibrosis kids

Cincinnati's Children's Hospital has pushed since 2001 to become one of a handful of elite Cystic Fibrosis Centers for kids. The hospital sought a "pursuing perfection" grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and used tools such as using evidence-based medicine, collecting and sharing data, learning from other centers, defining goals, collaborating with families, and adopting electronic records. Kids with CF suffer daily by participating in four hours of treatment to pursue a normal lifestyle. By adopting these new tools, the hospital pushes to improve the quality of life for their patients.

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UC researchers find changes in fat cells linked to diabetes

A research team at the University of Cincinnati recently found that cellular changes in fat tissue leads to type 2 Diabetes. Formerly believed to be linked to the immune system, this new research suggests otherwise as it may provide knowledge about different drugs to treat type 2 Diabetes and an insight into how aggressive cancers form. Researchers looked at the role of a gene known as protein kinase C, which has a dual role in the molecular signaling that leads to inflammation.

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Children's Hospital implements its own version of health-care reform

Two Harvard Business School professors explore how Cincinnati Children's Hospital implemented its own version of health care reform and transformed performance levels from below average to the top ten percent of the industry. One of the key players at the hospital, Dr. Uma Kotagal, used funding for a series of improvement projects such as an education program within the hospital on improvement science and the use of employees to serve as internal quality improvement consultants. This model at Children's Hospital shows that small changes can lead to significant change in the future.

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UC part of Iraq education partnership

The University of Cincinnati is among five universities to support and give resources to five Iraqi Universities. This linkage gives the universities a chance to transform Iraq's program and create a self-sustaining partnership. This program will focus on courses in basic English, education, economics, business, and finance.
 
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Cincinnati Zoo's Go Green Garden installs a Windspire wind turbine

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden installed the Windspire® wind turbine to help power the ticketing and membership building. This cost and energy efficient turbine produces approximately 2000 kilowatt hours per year in 12 mph average winds. The addition demonstrates the Zoo's dedication to going green and furthers its reputation as the greenest zoo in the country.

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Children's Hospital fights pediatric obesity

Pediatric surgeon Dr. Thomas Inge at Cincinnati Children's Hospital discusses pediatric obesity and weight loss surgery on teens. Prevention and education are the first solutions, but weight loss surgery has been a success by decreasing serious health problems such as diabetes and sleep apnea.

Read the full story here.

UC researchers get $2.3M grant for flu diagnostics

The University of Cincinnati received a five-year $2.3 million grant from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease. The research team is responsible for developing a rapid diagnostic tool for detecting the influenza virus. This tool will be beneficial to create effective countermeasures in the future.

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UC physician awarded $150K from the National Kidney Foundation for dialysis study

Timmy Lee, MD, UC Health nephrologist, staff VA physician and lead investigator on the study, was awarded the National Kidney Foundation's Young Investigator Award-totaling $150,000 over three years-to look at ways to improve access placement in patients starting dialysis for the first time. The goal is to increase the use of the most effective dialysis access in order to prevent extra surgeries and interventions in patients. This study along with a multi-disciplinary clinic at the VA for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease will be used in order to perform the research to improve the lives of patients.

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UC wins $3M in Third Frontier funding

The Ohio Third Frontier Wright Projects Program gave many local institutions funding for different research projects. The University of Cincinnati was awarded $3 million to research microfluidics technology and $7 million to develop and commercialize energy efficient building system technologies, designs, and best practices. GE Aviation Electrical Power Systems and Children's Hospital also received Third Frontier Funds and will collaborate with other Ohio institutions for research.

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Cincinnati Zoo renovates one of the world's oldest zoo's for kids

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden recently renovated and reopened the Joseph H. Spaulding Children's Zoo - one of the world's oldest. The renovated area includes a new play area with special features, a larger petting yard with the Zoo's friendliest animals, and an updated nursery viewing area.

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Cincinnati Children's Hospital lands $2.3M grant for cancer research

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have landed a $2.3 million federal grant to continue research into treatments for leukemia and and bone marrow failure.  The grants were distributed by the National Institute of Health and will fund five years worth of research.

The first of the two grants will fund research work studying the blocking of a protein that initiates disease in bone marrow and leukemia stem cells.  The second grant will be used to focus on how certain proteins affect the development of blood cells in bone marrow.

Read full article here.

First-generation college students stay the course in Cincinnati

First-generation college students at the University of Cincinnati are part of a new program that focuses on these often vulnerable students in a way to make sure they don't get left behind.  Many of first-generation college students nationally are also low-income students, and 89 percent end up leaving college within six years without a degree.

At UC, school officials have created dedicated housing exclusively for these at-risk students.  The housing provides a support structure specifically designed to get the students through the perils of college and out with a degree.

Watch full report here.

CrowdGather buys UC student's website for $1 Million

UC student Phil Santoro recently sold the website he created, Freeforums.org, to CrowdGather for $1 Million. Santoro's three-year-old site lets anybody set up an online forum and claims to have the "largest community among free forum hosts."

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University of Cincinnati researchers convert carbon dioxide and sunlight into fuel

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have successfully converted carbon dioxide and sunlight into fuel in a breakthrough for artificial photosynthesis research.  They did so by taking water, adding carbon dioxide and powering it by clean solar energy.

For some time researchers have been trying to figure out how to copy nature's extremely efficient photosynthesis process, and thanks to a Tungara frog, Cincinnati researchers may be close to releasing the findings on how to do it and, more astonishingly, in a more efficient process than nature itself.

Read full article here.
287 Uptown Articles | Page: | Show All
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