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Arts + Culture : Cincinnati In The News

350 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Avondale program shows how the arts contribute to creating more equitable places


Local arts leader Margy Waller has published a report about her painting project in Avondale on Americans for the Arts' ArtsBlog. It's her fifth blog post in 2016 related to her involvement with the organization's New Community Visions Initiative, a two-year effort to explore the role of community-based arts enabling organizations, funders, cultural institutions and artists in shaping the future of local arts in the U.S.

Waller's new blog post asks how the arts can contribute to creating more equitable places and offers her Avondale experience as an example of success.

"Leaders at two of the area hospitals seem to recognize the damage done to the neighborhood (by large institutions replacing homes with office buildings and parking lots) and are looking for ways to connect with residents, bridging and bonding with the community, creating a stronger place for all," she writes. "These leaders called for a partner to create an experience, having in mind something like the ArtWalks — community inspired and co-created crosswalk murals — we’ve created in other neighborhoods."

The resulting painting project at Gabriel's Place, Waller says, "might seem a small thing. But, no. Co-creating the art is a major happiness element, enhancing quality of life and connecting the neighborhood residents to people working at the encroaching institutions. Recognizing the damage done, the racist and privileged actions over decades, is large."

Read Margy Waller's full blog post here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Covington the most underrated place in Kentucky, says Thrillist ranking


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published another one of its "best/worst things in all 50 states list," this time identifying the most underrated place in each state. The city of Covington gets the honor for Kentucky: "This one-time downtrodden river town has become a hipster enclave," Thrillist declares.

The list's introduction says Thrillist asked the experts to help compile its list, "from our knowledgeable local writers and editors, to the state tourism boards and visitors bureaus, to our high school friends who never moved away."

Covington is noted for its "stunning views of America’s 10th-best skyline (Cincinnati!);" for "two of America’s best bourbon bars," Wiseguy and the Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar; for numerous historic districts; for the Cathedral Basilica, "a one-third replica of the cathedral at Notre Dame;" and for the Roebling Suspension Bridge, "the inspiration for that, you know, lesser-known bridge in Brooklyn."

Ohio's most underrated place is Cedar Point, and Indiana's is the Indianapolis Zoo.

Read the full Thrillist list here.
 

Preservation Magazine sees how Covington's Shotgun Row fosters a sense of community


Preservation Magazine's Spring issue includes a glowing feature story on how Covington is bringing back its West Side neighborhood, centered around rehabs of old shotgun homes on Orchard Street.

Soapbox profiled several "neighborhood heroes" in 2015 who helped lead that revitalization effort, particularly around reducing crime. We also covered the Shotgun Row concept as it geared up in 2014 and homes were put on the market in 2015 as work/living spaces for artists.

Preservation Magazine — published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation — interviews Sarah Allan, program director for the nonprofit Center for Great Neighborhoods, about its ongoing efforts to acquire, rehabilitate and sell derelict or seriously dilapidated historic buildings on Covington's West Side, "a working-class enclave across the Ohio River from Cincinnati."

"The Center has completed more than 30 projects in Covington in recent years, but Shotgun Row, for which it received a state historic preservation award, might be its crown jewel," the story says.

"These houses were so far gone, people questioned why we would even want to save them," Allan tells the magazine. "But with this project we were leveraging so much more than just a single building. We basically took the worst block and helped transform it. People look at Shotgun Row now and don’t even see the (individual) houses. It's like its own beautiful entity. It was definitely the most transformative project we've ever done."

Read the full Preservation Magazine story here.
 

Fodor's Travel explains why Cincinnati is now "a destination for those in the know"


Cincinnati is "stepping up its game and becoming a destination for those in the know," writes David Duran at Fodor's Travel in a post titled "Long Weekend in Cincinnati."

"Neighborhoods are diversifying, bringing more and more locals to the actual city center, which is in turn bringing more restaurants, shops and culture to areas that might have been lacking but were just waiting for a little TLC," Duran continues. "Cincinnati might surprise you, so a weekend away could be all it takes to convince you of how great the city truly is."

His itinerary included Friday night drinks at 21c Museum Hotel and dinner at Sotto; Saturday in Over-the-Rhine, including a walking tour and beer sampling at Rhinegeist, Taft's Ale House and Christian Moerlein; and Sunday at Findlay Market and Washington Park.

Read the full Fodor's Travel story here.

 

Contemporary Arts Center was one of Zaha Hadid's most striking designs, says New York Times


The New York Times offers a tribute to architect Zaha Hadid, who died March 31 at age 65, by highlighting her seven most striking designs, including the Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts downtown.

The former Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp, one of Hadid’s great champions, famously wrote of the new CAC facility in 2003: "Might as well blurt it out: The Rosenthal Center is the most important American building to be completed since the end of the Cold War."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 

Cincinnati's historic neighborhoods are well worth visiting


Sometimes, says a travel article in the Lexington Herald-Leader, we’re just in the mood for a nice getaway — one that doesn’t take too much advance planning and doesn’t put a substantial dent in the bank balance. Writer Patti Nickell suggests that Cincinnati — just a little more than an hour’s drive from Lexington, Ky. — offers great value for a reasonable price.

Nickell runs down a full list of name-brand attractions in Greater Cincinnati (Kings Island, Bengals games, Cincinnati Symphony, Museum Center at Union Terminal, etc.) but says the best surprises to be found here are in the historic neighborhoods. She spends a day each in her two favorites, Mt. Adams and Covington's MainStrasse.

Read the full Lexington Herald-Leader story here.
 

Fountain Square Christkindlmarkt among top 10 German-style Christmas markets in U.S.


USA Today recently published a roundup of popular Christmas markets in Germany, accompanied by a slideshow of the 10 best German-style holiday markets in the U.S., including the Cincideutsch market on Fountain Square.

"The Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt brings European holiday traditions to Cincinnati, an Ohio River city with a deep German heritage and a huge Oktoberfest," the slideshow says in describing the downtown weekend market.

The fourth annual Christkindlmarkt is run by Cincideutsch, a group of German-speaking residents in Cincinnati who enjoy celebrating their German heritage. The market vendors offer a variety of traditional holiday sweets and European baked goods, Glühwein (hot spiced wine) and other hot beverages, Christian Moerlein beer and handcrafted gifts and seasonal decorations. It's open 4-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 20.

See the full USA Today top 10 list here.
 

Good times in Cincinnati, A (art) to Z (Zula)


Andrew Davis, managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times, a newspaper and website serving the LGBTQ community, visited Cincinnati recently as part of its TRAVEL series and came away impressed.

"When I told several people I'd be headed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and neighboring northern Kentucky," Davis wrote in the opening to his report, "I pretty much received a collective shrug as well as comments like, 'You'll probably run out of things to do within a day.' Well, I'm here to tell people near and far that Cincinnati and Kentucky have a LOT to offer — primarily with (courtesy of revitalization) some pretty unique spots that make the area memorable."

Davis' whirlwind visit included Over-the-Rhine, Covington's MainStrasse district ("reminded me of Evanston"), Clifton and Northside ("full of treasures of all types").

Read the full story from Windy City Times here.
 

Jens Lekman making music more personal and intimate from Cincinnati


Jens Lekman is one of Sweden's best-known musicians and a darling of the indie pop world, writes Stephen Heyman in The New York Times. He has three full-length albums to his name, including 2007's Night Falls Over Kortedala, which made it onto several critics' lists of the last decade's best records.

Heyman runs a Q&A in the Times's International Arts section to explore Lekman's recent push into more intimate and immediate ways of music-making and explains how he was in Cincinnati this fall working on a project called "Ghostwriting" in which he interviewed people about their lives and turned their stories into songs he later released for free on his website.

Lekman performed a few weeks ago at the Woodward Theater in a collaboration with MYCincinnati Youth Orchestra.

Read the full New York Times Q&A here.
 

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers


The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.
 
350 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
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