| Follow Us:

Uptown : Buzz

275 Uptown Articles | Page: | Show All

New for aspiring doctors, the people skills test

The University of Cincinnati Medical School joins seven other top medical training programs, including Stanford and UCLA, to include nine brief interviews to test if potential medical school students have the social skills needed to survive in a field where communication is critically important and too often undervalued.

Read the full story here.

National NIOSH symposium here July 12-13

A national safety symposium taking place at the University of Cincinnati this week looks at successful partnership models from around the country, and broadcasts some of its sessions live.

Read the full story here.

Cincinnati ranks #1 for best emergency care

HealthGrades ranked the Top 10 Cities for Emergency Medicine, ranking Cincinnati as the number one place for the best emergency care. HealthGrades analyzed patient volumes, quality ratings, and range of services provided at each hospital.

Read the full story here.

UC research digs deep into the fracking controversy

A new growing industry promises jobs and access to cheaper energy resources on American soil. But this process raises concern and controversy as "fracking" involves using millions of gallons of water, sand, and chemical to break up organic-rich shale to release natural gases. A University of Cincinnati doctoral student of geography, Deborah Kittner, has been researching this topic and will present "What's the Fracking Problem?" at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting.

Read the full story here.

New startup incubator focuses on innovation in the health sector

Startup catalyst Rock Health is soliciting hopeful health startups to apply for a chance to develop their ideas into fully-fledged businesses, products and services. To assist them, they will receive a grant, office space in Silicon Valley, branding, design and PR advice from Rock Health's in-house Creative Director, and access to experts at hospital partners such as Cincinnati Childrens Hospital.

Read the full story here.

UC launches first comprehensive brain cancer research program with $6.5M

University of Cincinnati hopes to improve treatment strategies for brain cancer and has launched the first comprehensive brain metastasis-specific translational research program in the country to better understand how cancer spreads in the brain.

Read the full story here.

Tour of the University of Cincinnati DAAP

Michael DiTullo, a member of frog design - a global innovation firm - toured the University of Cincinnati's DAAP and interacted with students through conversation and critiques. Having worked with DAAP grads in the past, DiTullo's impression was validated as he was impressed by the hardworking students and professors.

Read the full story here.

JCPenney unveils new logo designed by UC student

JC Penny revamped its logo to bring younger and lapsed consumers into its stores. After reviewing many submissions from company associates, design agencies, the University of Cincinnati, and Rhode Island School of Design, JC Penny chose a design by Luke Langhus, a third-year graphic design student at UC. The new logo will be featured at the end of this month and the store will update all packaging and external store signage in the next three years.

Read the full story here.

UC Psychology students to present on cheaper textbook alternatives at national conference

Eleven University of Cincinnati psychology students will present their research on educational technology alternatives to purchasing college textbooks at the national EDUCAUSE Annual meeting in Washington D.C. Their research is a part of the Digital Bookshelf Project, which is an initiative to develop flexible and affordable systems for educational purposes. Students found that free e-textbooks, lower cost print materials, and Wikipedia all provided similar learning support.

Read the full story here.

Scientists study hand movements for ADHD clue

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center partnered with Baltimore's Kenny Krieger Institute for research on children with ADHD. Research found that children's impulsive hand movements control ability may have insight on brain-based differences of the ADHD children. Different studies showed that ADHD children had twice the amount of unintentional extra movements showing that actions and behavior may be unintentional as well.

Read the full story here.

Using clot buster for mild stroke could save millions

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that the blood-clot dissolving drug (tPA) can help reduce the number of patients left disabled after suffering from strokes, saving $200 million in annual disability costs. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

Read the full story here.

A toast to history: 500 years of wine-drinking cups mark social shifts in ancient Greece

How commonly used items - like wine drinking cups - change through time can tell us a lot about those times, according to research presented by Kathleen Lynch, UC associate professor of classics, at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Read the full story here.

Famed designer says DAAP one of few design schools not failing their students

Famed designer,Gadi Amit, questions if design schools are failing their students. As Amit reviewed candidate's portfolios to join his growing team, he noticed the lack of quality in student's work. According to Amit, fortunately the one U.S. exception is the University of Cincinnati with "an excellent program and very solid graduates."

Read the full story here.

Children's Hospital part of mother's crusade against rare form of muscular dystrophy

Children's Hospital part of mother's crusade against rare form of muscular dystrophy. A mother of two sons with Duhenne Muscular Dystrophy in Middletown, Ohio is an activist for research for a cure. She also helped lobby congress to pass legislation in order to fund research and founded the organization Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy. Cincinnati's Children's Hospital is the leading clinical treatment center for Duhenne in the country.

Read the full story here.

Future e-readers could be made of paper

With E-books' popularity over hardcover books increasing this past year, engineers at the University of Cincinnati have revealed that paper could be used as a flexible backing for an electronic display. Using paper is a convenient, renewable, flexible, and cheap material that could be used as a platform for electrowetting. Researchers experimented with all sorts of papers, hoping to develop a future device that rolls and feels like paper yet delivers books, news, and video.

Read the full story here.
275 Uptown Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts