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Cincinnati In The News

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21c Cincinnati named top hotel in Midwest by Condé Nast Traveler

Condé Nast Traveler recently announced its 30th annual Readers’ Choice Awards, recognizing 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati as one of the best in the world. Each of 21c Museum Hotels’ seven properties received high honors, with 21c Cincinnati landing at the no. 5 spot on the Top Hotels in the Midwest list.

Five other 21c Museum Hotels were named as Top Hotels in the South, including 21c Lexington (No. 6), 21c Nashville (No. 15), 21c Louisville (No. 17), 21c Durham (No. 22) and 21c Bentonville (No. 37). The rankings are based on the quality of rooms, service, food and dining, location and overall design.

More than 300,000 readers submitted millions of ratings and tens of thousands of comments, voting on a record-breaking 7,320 hotels and resorts, 610 cities, 225 islands, 468 cruise ships, 158 airlines and 195 airports.

For more information about the awards, click here.

The Golden Lamb: Ohio's oldest restaurant

When it's time to try out a new restaurant, we're used to reading Yelp and Facebook reviews, but the longevity of a place says something too. Delish rounded up the oldest restaurant in each state — and some of these eateries have been open for centuries, including Ohio's.

Just north of Cincinnati is Lebanon, home to the oldest continuously operating hotel and restaurant in the state, The Golden Lamb. Open since 1803, it's seen its fair share of famous folks, including 12 U.S. presidents and author and abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Located in the heart of downtown Lebanon, The Golden Lamb's signature fried chicken has stood the test of time and is a favorite among locals and visitors alike. Plus, it's rumored that the hotel is haunted by at least three ghosts.

Check out the full list of oldest restaurants in America here.

Local startup shoots for the stars in data analysis

Astronomer, a CincyTech seed fund company, is working to give data analysts some of their time back. The two-year-old local startup has already raised $5.5 million in funding from Silicon Valley accelerators AngelPad and 500 Startups, as well as venture capital firm Frontline Ventures.

The startup helps companies build automated data pipelines, which are programs that gather data from various sources and collect it in central databases for analysis. This means that data analysts can spend less time manually entering data into spreadsheets and more time finding trends within the data.

Astronomer's goal is to make data tasks easier for non-tech companies. Its platform comes in two tiers — the base tier simplifies the pipeline process to selecting source and destination applications from a list of built-in integrations. Pricing is structured simply, starting at free to use and gradually scaling with the number of data events per month.

Its software has sold well in the non-tech sector, and companies like Roadtrippers, Everything But The House and CVG are already customers.

Click here to read more about Astronomer in Forbes.


Cincinnati ranked fourth healthiest city in the U.S.

According to data compiled by Healthgrades Inc., Cincinnati is the fourth healthiest city in the country. It came in just behind the Twin Cities, Denver and Sacramento, and just head of Portland, Baltimore and Milwaukee.

Cincinnati ranks very high in access to high-quality hospitals, and it received grades near the national average for the overall health of its population and the ratio of doctors to the population, but fell short in the risky behaviors ranking.

Healthgrades’ new index is designed to help consumers make healthcare choices in their market. It was created by combining information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2015 survey, the 2015 Association of American Medical Colleges Report and the Healthgrades 2018 hospital quality rankings.

To see how other cities stacked up, click here.

Music Hall renovations set the stage for NYC's Geffen Hall

The New York Philharmonic's performance space, David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, is in desperate need of renovations. But it just scrapped a $500 million gut renovation, unlike Cincinnati's Music Hall, which just underwent a $135 million renovation.

On Oct. 6, Music Hall reopened with much pomp and circumstance. The two-year renovation paid off — patrons are now "closer to the music," as the CSO's Louis Langrée put it.

Read the New York Times' article about how Cincy is leading the way for Geffen Hall's proposed transformation.

You can read our full Cincy Sets the Stage series about Music Hall's renovation here

Dent Schoolhouse lands on Buzzfeed's scariest list

It's almost Halloween, and in honor of that spookiest of holidays, Buzzfeed has rounded up its top 13 scariest haunted houses in the country, and Cincinnati's own Dent Schoolhouse made the list. 

Housed in an old school (opened in 1894), the Dent Schoolhouse plays on that by leading you through the school's dark history, which centers around the tale of Charlie the janitor who killed students. (It's rumored that even without the haunted house, the Dent Schoolhouse is actually haunted.)

If you want to get the pants scared off of you this month, purchase tickets for the Dent Schoolhouse.


Beer is rebooting Cincinnati neighborhoods

"Beer is bringing back our neighborhoods." Mayor John Cranley, 2017 State of the City address

Food & Wine recently dived into this statement, and found that Cranley is right. According to numbers from the Brewers Association, which represents the interests of small and independent breweries nationwide, craft brewing contributed about $68 billion to the economy last year, and created nearly half a million jobs.

Cincinnati is currently home to over 40 breweries, and another 11 are in the works. It's evident that neighborhood breweries are helping boost the city's economy — brewery owners are renovating buildings, hiring local workers and boosting the local economy.

Food & Wine highlighted four breweries — Brink, Rhinegeist, Urban Artifact and Woodburn — that are doing all of the above.

Click here to read more about Cincinnati's booming brewconomy.

Greater Cincinnati no. 1 metro area in sustainability

Site Selection released its 2017 Sustainability Rankings, which are driven by a unique index of factors. Ohio is the third most sustainable state in the U.S., and among U.S. metro areas, the Greater Cincinnati area landed itself at no. 1.

This ranking is in part because of companies like Procter & Gamble, which continues to pursue its own aggressive sustainability agenda. Recent green steps include investments in recycling and beneficial reuse that by 2020, will eliminate all manufacturing waste from P&G's global network of more than 100 production sites.

UC is also a leader in the sustainability game. The new $120 million Carl H. Lindner College of Business will be LEED Gold certified when it opens in 2019. Since 2004, UC has constructed six LEED-certified buildings, including the award-winning Morgans and Scioto student residence halls.

To see where other states, countries and metro areas ranked, click here.

Cincy's food scene affordable, accessible and boozy

Cincinnati's great restaurants and strong foodie scene recently landed it on WalletHub's list of the best cities in America for foodies.

The study looked at more than 180 of the largest U.S. cities across 24 data points, including affordability and accessibility of high-quality restaurants, food festivals per capita and craft breweries and wineries per capita.

Cincy came in at no. 20 on the list, and is one of the more foodie-friendly cities in the country. Here's how Cincinnati's food scene ranked in a few categories:
  • Average beer and wine price: no. 29
  • Restaurants per capita: no. 24
  • Affordability and accessibility of highly rated restaurants: no. 32
  • Gourmet specialty food stores per capita: no. 12
  • Craft breweries and wineries per capita: no. 11
  • Coffee and tea shops per capita: no. 32
To see how other cities stacked up, click here.


BLINK: by the numbers

This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.


DAAP connection pays off for UCLA professor

Casey Reas, professor of design media arts at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, has roots in Cincinnati: he's a graduate of UC's DAAP. His DAAP connections have landed him work with The National, an alt-rock band. 

Reas met The National's bassist, Scott Devendorf, and singer Matt Berninger when they were all graphic design students at DAAP — he even played drums for them, once upon a time.

The National just released its seventh album, "Sleep Well Beast," and Reas helped create four music videos for songs on the album. He used an open-source programming language called Processing, which he helped co-create, to make the videos.

Along with music videos, Reas' work has been exhibited in art galleries and projected onto buildings all over the globe.

To read more about Reas' process for creating The National's music videos, click here.

Locally founded Crossroads now the fastest-growing church in the U.S.

Crossroads has come a long way since its founding in 1995. It has 10 physical locations in Ohio and Kentucky (including three in Cincinnati and one more on the way), which equates to more than 28,000 parishoners.

Outreach Magazine recently named Crossroads the fastest-growing church in the U.S.; in 2016, its attendance jumped 26 percent. (Also, Crossroads has about 21,000 more members than the no. 2 fastest-growing church.)

To read more about Crossroads and view the other top 10 fastest-growing churches in the country, click here.

OTR named one of five Great Neighborhoods by the APA

Last week, the American Planning Association named Over-the-Rhine one of five Great Neighborhoods on its annual Great Places in America list. The list marks the kick-off for the APA’s National Community Planning Month celebration.

Like much of the city, OTR has undergone huge changes in the past 15 years, and it's now considered one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Planning efforts showcase the historic nature of OTR and will help preserve the neighborhood’s legacy.

As part of the distinction, Mayor John Cranley declared Oct. 4 “Over-the-Rhine ‘Great Neighborhood’ Day” in Cincinnati.

Through continued public-private partnerships and the ongoing support of the community’s residents, developers have been able to restore historic buildings like Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the former St. Paul's Evangelical Church (now home to Taft's Ale House); create community gathering spaces like Washington Park and Ziegler Park; and create new housing options all over OTR.

Along with OTR, APA also recognized Seward in Minneapolis; the Heart of Missoula; Uptown Greenwood, SC; and Pearl in San Antonio.

Click here to read more about APA's Great Places in America. 

Have you been to the Cincinnati Nature Center?

Only in Your State recently gave a shoutout to the Cincinnati Nature Center, which is the largest member-supported nature center in the country.

With two locations just outside of the city — one in Milford and the other in Goshen Township — the CNC is one of the region's best kept secrets. In total, it's home to 1,600 acres of natural landscape, 20 trails and countless opportunities to interact with nature.

You can visit the CNC as a day guest, but there are member-only perks. There are membership rates available to students and families on a one-year or two-year basis; click here for more infomation.

Read more about why Only in Your State loves the CNC.

UC's Crosley Tower considered one of nation's ugliest buildings

Cincinnati has a rich architectural history: some of its most historic buildings were designed by famed architect Samuel Hannaford, and residents are proud of its rich architectural history. Efforts continue to renovate and restore the city's gems, which is evident in the soon-to-reopen Music Hall and Union Terminal.

However, Crosley Tower at the University of Cincinnati was named one of the ugliest buildings in the U.S. by Architectural Digest. The magazine claims that the building looks like it's a single slab of concrete and would be a good home for a Disney villain. 

Crosley Tower isn't alone — click here to see the other seven buildings that made AD's list.
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