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Entrepreneurship : Cincinnati In The News

226 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All

Eric Avner and People's Liberty lauded for innovative approach to philanthropy


People's Liberty is a five-year experiment to see how philanthropy can be done differently and possibly even more effectively, CEO Eric Avner explains in an "Innovator of the Week" profile story from Urban Innovation Exchange. Avner and his team didn't want something permanent but instead devised a timeline with a sense of urgency.
 
"Building this as a separate brand from the (Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation) gives us ability to be more experimental, to have a slightly cheekier tone, a different pace, a different way of using tech and design," Avner tells UIX. "All of these things, whether storytelling or design or metrics or outreach or work culture, will ultimately make us better grant makers. It also sets the tone for how to reach people in ways that are more authentic without seeming stuffy, but do it in a different way than foundations typically operate."
 
Avner, Vice President and Senior Program Manager at the Haile Foundation, launched People's Liberty in summer 2014 and awarded its first grants later that year.

Detroit-based Urban Innovation Exchange is an initiative to advance the growing movement of people leading change in cities. Launched in 2012 as a three-year project funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, UIX now showcases catalytic talent transforming cities and neighborhoods across the U.S.

Soapbox's parent company, Issue Media Group, is a UIX national partner.

Read the full Urban Innovation Exchange story here.
 

Findlay Market named among nation's top historic food markets


Findlay Market was recently named one of the top food markets in the country by USA Today. Opened in 1855, Findlay Market is the oldest continuously operating market in the United States.

The market has a plethora of indoor vendors as well as farmers market stands set up outside on the weekends. Model Group is currently developing retail space and apartments around the market, with new businesses expected to open in these spaces.

You can find out more about Findlay Market, and others like it, here.
 

Artichoke OTR rated one of the 10 great U.S. cookware shops


The Food Network website is featuring Artichoke among the 10 great cookware shops in the U.S. in a listicle titled "Where Cooks Shop." The Over-the-Rhine store opened a few months ago just north of Findlay Market on Elm Street.

Andrea Strong highlights "finds for your kitchen at these cook-approved spots around the country," which include independently-owned shops in Brooklyn, Chicago and Philadelphia in addition to Artichoke.

Read the full Food Network list here.
 

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 

Local startup Spatial among 12 international companies in auto mobility accelerator


The mobility accelerator operated by Boulder-Color.-based Techstars recently named Cincinnati startup Spatial as one of the 12 companies in its Techstars Mobility Class of 2016. Each is building automotive mobility technologies and services that enable people and goods to move around more freely, according to the announcement posted on Techstars' website.

"The quality of teams and companies applying this year has been incredible," writes Techstars Mobility Managing Director Ted Serbinski. "We saw a world-wide response with applications from 52 countries across 6 continents. There was a 44 percent increase in mobility-focused companies. Most impressive, 50 percent of the 2016 companies include founders with diverse backgrounds."

Spatial uses data from social media platforms to describe the feel of a neighborhood on maps, a big help to people planning trips to cities or areas they aren't familiar with. The startup was part of Ocean's accelerator class earlier this year, graduating in April.

As part of the Techstars Mobility Class, Serbinski says, Spatial will participate in a Sept. 8 demo day "where we expect over 1,000 people to come see and meet these 12 startups."

Techstars has increased its investment relationship with Cintrifuse in recent years and is partnering with Cintrifuse to present its annual FounderCon in Cincinnati in October.

Read the full Techstars blog post here.
 

Mortar turns locals into entrepreneurs in Cincinnati's gentrifying economy


Mortar's nine-week business development program is explained and celebrated in Yes! Magazine, a nonprofit, ad-free online and print publication offering tools for citizen engagement and stories about real people working for a better world.

While Mortar is open to all, Araz Hachadourian writes, the majority of its students are low-income women — like Jasmine Ford, who is featured in the story. After going through the Mortar program and raising funds through a Kiva campaign, Ford is planning to open a storefront bakery, Jazzy Sweeties, in Walnut Hills.

"The (Mortar) idea sprung from founders Derrick Braziel and Allen Woods, who live in Cincinnati’s historic Over-the-Rhine neighborhood," Hachadourian writes. "Once a working-class neighborhood made up mostly of German immigrants, the area was later populated by African Americans arriving during the Great Migration. Most businesses then were bars and small shops.

"Over the years, tech firms moved in and more than $843 million was invested in Over-the-Rhine and the surrounding downtown area, bringing an onslaught of development and new residents. Braziel says the neighborhood still has small businesses, 'but they’re serving a different demographic now.'"

"A lot of the entrepreneurs that we work with operate out of the underground cash economy," Braziel says. "They’re running businesses out of their living room or they’re doing business out of their trunk or they’re hustling in some way, shape, or form. There’s talent all around, what’s lacking is the know-how."

Read the full Yes! Magazine story here.
 

Japp's recognized by Esquire as one of the "best bars in America"


Molly Wellmann and her Japp's establishment on Main Street get high praise from Esquire Magazine's David Wondrich, who includes the Over-the-Rhine gem on his list of the 18 best bars in America.

Wondrich writes about the revolution he's witnessed over 11 years as Esquire's Drinks Correspondent, where most U.S. cities are now supporting craft cocktail bars that are full.

"People are paying double to drink in them, and they're not outraged," he writes. "They're coming back, over and over. They're putting their phones away (well, mostly), forgetting about the game, doing their best to act sober. (In my years of visiting these joints, I've rarely seen anybody visibly intoxicated — tipsy, sure; drunk, uncool.) The bartenders, their mustachioed, inked hipsterdom aside, are generally studious and hardworking (if perhaps too devoted to making things by hand that really don't need to be). All of this while the media and the political class are hyperventilating about the irreparable decline of America."

Wondrich suggests getting a Cool Jules at Japp's, "a gin-and-port stunner." Unless it's Tiki night, "in which case, pick something rummy from the chalkboard."

Read the full Esquire Magazine list here.
 

Over-the-Rhine is Cincinnati's booming foodie neighborhood


The Chicago Tribune's travel section features a nice guide to Over-the-Rhine dining options, saying, "Eating in the so-called OTR starts — but doesn't necessarily stop — in the 1300 block of Vine Street, which has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past decade. You can do breakfast, lunch and dinner without leaving the block."

Spots highlighted include Holtman's Donuts (the story features a photo of staffer DeShawn Ashley holding a tray of donuts), The Eagle, Pontiac BBQ, Quan Hapa, Graeter's and Findlay Market.

Read the full Chicago Tribune story here.
 

Want a bike-friendly city? Get ready to fail until it works, says Wired


Here's a fascinating article from Wired about building a bike-friendly culture in cities. Although it doesn't specifically mention Cincinnati, its findings and recommendations definitely apply to us.

"Building any infrastructure, anywhere, is a pain in the neck," writes Aarian Marshall. "You've got to find exactly the right government agencies, community groups, funding sources and contractors. And then you've got to figure out the logistics of construction and worry about the inevitable delays and cost overruns."

But Marshall then says not to despair, that there's good news for our soon-to-be bicycling-loving cities. "Across the country, usually stodgy governments are trying quick and dirty pilot projects, putting down cheap and temporary bicycle infrastructure and giving it a literal test drive (well, ride) before committing to the big stuff."

Like bike-only lanes along Central Parkway?

"Laying down temporary infrastructure before ginning up anything permanent also provides an opportunity to convince skeptics about the upsides of bike travel," Marshall writes. "Demonstration projects go a long way in terms of alleviating fears. Once residents see bicycle infrastructure in action, he says, they (usually) decide it doesn’t take up too much room or cost too much money. That makes it politically easier to build permanent protected lanes, bike boxes and signals."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

How the smart cities like Cincinnati use Internet of Things to attract young, skilled workforce


Social media expert and management professor Beverly Macy writes in Huffington Post about the coming connectivity explosion through embrace of the Internet of Things, saying there will be 24 billion IoT devices installed globally by 2020 and $6 trillion invested in IoT solutions over the next five years.

As the "great digital transformation of 2016" proceeds in both the private and public sectors around the globe, Macy says, we'll all be affected by the digital innovation in more ways than one.

She says the nation's "smart cities" are attracting a youthful and highly skilled workforce with "livability and connectedness" as key selling points, using Cincinnati as a prime example. As part of the White House’s TechHire Initiative, Cincinnati is looking to retrain displaced workers as application developers who could be hired on in IoT startups popping up or by companies like local manufacturer Mazak Corp.

Read the full Huffington Post story here.
 

Cincinnati one of America's 10 best new cities for beer lovers


Fortune Magazine has a new feature story about the top 10 U.S. cities with great under-the-radar craft beer scenes, including Cincinnati.

"Other cities are starting to build strong reputations of their own," the story says after citing San Diego, Denver, Portland and San Francisco as national craft beer powerhouses. "To avoid any regional bias, we spoke to people throughout the beer industry — from brewers to hop farmers — to get their take on areas that are showing a lot of potential, though may still be under-the-radar on a national basis."

The craft brewery industry has exploded across Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the story says, and mentions two breweries with large expansions: Rhinegeist in Over-the-Rhine and MadTree, which is preparing to build an $18 million brewery and taproom in Oakley.

Read the full Fortune story here.
 

How "Carol" helped bring Hollywood to Cincinnati


"We hear a lot these days about the revival of many of once-great American cities, from the Rust Belt of Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and all the way down to Houston," John Oseid writes in the Forbes lifestyle section. "Everyone's got their own list, but most anyone's should include Cincinnati."

Oseid (author bio: "I cover the world of travel with gusto ... literally, the world") says the film industry has helped put Cincinnati on the path to revival.

"Carol director Todd Haynes is known, per The New York Times, for his meticulous period recreations, and recognized that Cincinnati was a goldmine of locations," he writes, mentioning a litany of other films that were shot in the area recently: Don Cheadle's "highly-anticipated" Miles Ahead, Marauders starring Bruce Willis and Christopher Meloni, hometown actress Royalty Hightower's breakout role in The Fits, James Franco's Goat and Mickey Rourke's boxing movie Tiger.

Forbes references a University of Cincinnati study saying this cinematic activity amounted to 8,880 local jobs created and $54 million in direct spending over the last two years alone. Oseid ends his story with this tip: "Should you wish to shoot your next movie in Hollywood on the Ohio, the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Film Commission is waiting for your call."

Read the full Forbes story here.
 

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 

UPDATE: AT&T to launch "smart cities" push with forward-thinking regions


AT&T is announcing this week how it will work with cities to turn everyday objects like traffic lights and parking spots into tools to manage congestion and conserve energy. Re/Code — a tech news, reviews and analysis website from Vox Media — says the "smart cities" sector, which includes everything from revamping the energy grid to digitizing government processes, is estimated to be a $1.5 trillion market by 2020 and that AT&T is anxious to get become a leader in the field.

"We see this as a massive opportunity," AT&T Mobility CEO Glenn Lurie told the website.

Broadly defined, explains Re/Code, "a smart city uses technology to change how urban environments are designed and managed to reduce expenses and improve efficiency. Telecom companies are working with forward-thinking municipalities to make decisions based on data from sensors added to locations and objects throughout the city. Imagine your car alerting you to the location of an open parking spot based on data broadcast by the spaces themselves or not having to wait at red lights because the road knows you are the only car there."

UPDATE: AT&T has announced that its first three U.S. partner cities will be Atlanta, Chicago and Dallas. Maybe next time for Cincinnati?

Read the full Re/Code post here.
 
226 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All
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