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entrepreneurship : Cincinnati In The News

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Tucker's named best breakfast destination in Ohio


Foodie site Extra Crispy must love breakfast — because they compiled a list of the best breakfast destinations in the country. While there are a few that are obvious to this list (Peppermill in Las Vegas, for example), many more will surprise you, including the spot from Ohio — Tucker's Restaurant.

Tucker's has been a Cincinnati staple since 1946, and you don't last that long in the restaurant biz without amassing something of a cult following.

The mom-and-pop diner nearly burned down after a grease fire in 2015, but the community helped raise the funds needed to reopen.

It serves all-day breakfast (well, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. breakfast because the place closes in the early afternoon), and is known for dishing up goetta, a native Cincinnati dish.

Check out the full list here to find a place to nosh on your next road trip.
 

Two local startup accelerators place among 30 best in national study


Two local startup accelerators were recently ranked among the best in the nation by Seed Rankings.

Over-the-Rhine's The Brandery was placed in the Silver category and Covington-based UpTech in the Bronze category. 

Seed Rankings looked at a number of data points, including Qualified Fundraising, Survival, Founder Satisfaction (which was obtained from a survey of entrepreneurs who have graduated from the pool of 150 accelerator programs) and Alumni Network.

The ranking provides information for entrepreneurs who are looking to join an accelerator and are in search of more information, including total dollars funded and the success rate of the accelerators.

Other startups that made the top 30 include Denver-based Techstars (Platinum), California's 500 Startups (Gold) and the nonprofit Lighthouse Labs (Bronze).

People's Liberty continues to make waves


People's Liberty is at the halfway point of its five-year mission. To date, it's funded 50 Cincinnatians to bring innovative ideas to the city — and it still has 50 more projects to fund.

PL has two rounds of applications a year; once projects are chosen, grants are given in three categories: $10,000 art installation grants, $15,000 storefront grants (the grantee sets up shop for six weeks in the Dept. of Doing, PL's first-floor retail space) and two $100,000 Haile Fellowships.

The philanthropic foundation's goal is to fund creative projects that lead to social engagement or change.

Read more about PL in this article from Forbes.
 

Ten places to eat for $10 or less in Greater Cincinnati


Everyone is on a budget these days, but USA Today hit the jackpot and dug up the best eats and drinks in Greater Cincinnati that are $10 and under.

  • Carabello Coffee in Newport features fresh roasted coffees to-go, to enjoy in its cafe or to sip at the Analog Slow Bar.
  • Chili is a Cincinnati staple, but according to USA Today, Camp Washington Chili has the best bang for your buck.
  • Che has a great happy hour, but its fritas are always only a few dollars.
  • The McCoppin's breakfast sandwich at Hotel Covington's restaurant Coppin's is $10 and is served with a side of potatoes.
  • A whole meal of mouth-watering smoked meats and picnic-ready sides is available at either Eli's BBQ location for about $8.
  • Turtles at Gomez Salsa are the perfect on-the-go food, and they don't hurt your pocketbook either.
  • The Globe, a new bar in downtown Covington, has some thirst-quenching drink deals.
  • Everything on the menu at Graeter's is under $10.
  • Housemade macarons at Macaron Bar are $2.50 a piece, or you can take home a box of six for $12.
  • Zip's Cafe in Mt. Lookout has been around for decades, and the prices haven't changed much.
 

The Video Archive gets visits from two entertainment powerhouses


The Video Archive is getting lots of press lately, including from Bon Appetit and Bravo! The Quentin Tarantino-themed bar is hidden behind a secret door in a small movie store.

Once you enter the bar, you enter the world of Pulp Fiction, where clips from the film play on TVs around the bar, and a wall of Uma Thurmans hang out over the jukebox. The $5 milkshake is a must-have, and just like at the video store, you can order your favorite movie snacks.

The Video Archive also hosts movie nights on its outdoor patio, and the staff of talented bartenders create themed cocktails for the events. 

Read more about The Video Archive here and here.

Graeter's Black Raspberry Chip named a summer staple


Graeter's has been around since 1870, and the company has stayed true to its artisinal, small batch, handcrafted roots for more than 145 years.

Its OG flavor, Black Raspberry Chip, was handpicked by People.com as one of the summer's must-have ice creams. And that's saying something (just check out the list)!

If you've never had Black Raspberry Chip, it's a creamy black raspberry flavored ice cream with huge chunks of chocolate smattered throughout. You can get a scoop of it at any of Graeter's Cincinnati locations or purchase a pint of it for about $6 at regional grocery stores.

Or, if you're like Oprah, you can ship six pints of it to your front door for $80.

Queen City tops list of 25 best cities for people under the age of 35


There are many reasons why Cincinnati attracts young professionals: locally owned and operated restaurants, great beer, rich history, affordable housing and a strong job market. According to CNBC, these are just a few of the reasons why the city made it on Growella's list of top 25 cities for people under the age of 35.

Cincinnati came in at no. 16, just ahead of St. Louis.

Cincinnati received an A-, and is considered a great place for millenials because it has the ninth strongest paycheck 17 percent more job openings than the average city.

To decide the top 25 cities, Growella, which is based right here in Cincinnati, looked at these criteria: 
  1. How many entry-level jobs are available in the city? (7.5 percent of score)
  2. How much time is spent commuting in the city? (7.5 percent of score)
  3. What's the public transportation situation like in the city? (10 percent of score)
  4. How many other young people live there? (15 percent of score)
  5. What's the after-work and weekend scene like in the city? (10 percent of score)
  6. How far does a paycheck get you in the city? (50 percent of score)
Cities that scored 90+ received an A.

Check out the other 24 cities.

 

Lisnr developed a data-over-audio tech that has widespread applications


Founded in 2012, local startup Lisnr developed a data-over-audio technology in 2014 that could replace Bluetooth, NCR and QR code scanning.

Smart Tone doesn't need an internet connection to work, but the speakers that are "talking" to each other have to be in close proximity to one another. Lisnr's co-founder and CEO Rodney Williams says that his program has a lot of practical implications — Smart Tone was beta tested by ticketing companies, airlines, transportation companies, theaters, retailers, banks, mobile wallet providers, real estate companies and security firms.

Jaguar/Land Rover is now using it to personalize car settings by "talking" to the driver's smartphone. Lisnr also just landed the world's largest ticketing company as a customer, and Smart Tone has gone live in several locations around the globe. 

Lisnr isn't a one-trick pony: Locally, it has teamed up with the Contemporary Arts Center for an interactive museum experience that runs through June 18.

To read more about Smart Tone and Lisnr, click here.

Cincinnati ranks in the top 150 best large cities to start a business


Cincinnati is known for its startup scene and constant flow of new, small business openings. But how does it rank when stacked up against other large U.S. cities?

WalletHub recently conducted a study that looked at 18 key metrics, ranging from five-year business survival rates to office-space affordability in 150 of the country's largest cities.

Cincinnati came in at no. 105 overall, and no. 126 in Business Environment, no. 56 in Access to Resources and no. 53 in Business Cost.

And when comparing Best Cities vs. Worst Cities in the category Lowest Availability of Human Capital, Cincinnati came in at no. 148.

To read more about how WalletHub determined its findings, click here.

Cintrifuse serves as model to spur Pittsburgh business collaboration


Pittsburgh-based business professional Kit Needham relied on advice from Cintrifuse's Eric Weismann in creating an awards ceremony to encourage interaction between corporations and startups.

The ceremony took place last week and honored Giant Eagle grocers for its utilization of human resource and management apps created by Pittsburgh startups.

“Even though we may not want to admit it during football season, we’re fighting the same fight,” Weissman says of the burgeoning Cincinnati-Pittsburgh entrepreneurial connection.

Needham took a cue from a Cintrifuse model that has influenced at least $97.6 million in investment, all through the creation of a syndicate “fund of funds” containing approximately $57 million. This syndicate fund invests in other pools around the U.S., which then invest in Cincinnati startups. 

Click here to read the full Pittsburgh Gazette story.

Cincinnati is one of the world's most competitive cities


Cincinnati is growing at a rapid rate, and not just in the number of breweries that call the city home. Site Selection Magazine released its report on the World's Most Competitive Cities, and the Queen City finished in the top five of all North American cities in seven of the nine categories. 

Cincinnati ranked no. 3 in electronics and food and beverage; no. 4 in both automotive and chemicals and plastics; and no. 5 in aerospace, business and financial services, and machinery, equipment and construction.

These rankings mean that the Greater Cincinnati market is highly competitive when it comes to bringing new businesses and companies to town. 

To see where other world cities finished, click here.

 

Queen City is the third best city for young professionals


According to technology company Move Buddha, Cincinnati is the third best city for young professionals.

Move Buddha looked at several factors when evaluating cities, including the average cost of rent for a one-bedroom apartment, the number of bars per square mile, the percentage of the population between the ages of 20-30, the average age of residents and the unemployment rate.

Here are the statistics for Cincinnati:
  • Average rent: $630 (one-bedroom)
  • Bars per square mile: 12
  • Percent of population ages 20-30: 19%
  • Average age: 32.7
  • Unemployment rate: 4.1%
Are you a YP looking for a new city? Check out the full list here.

How can smart cities make money for the community?


Jon Salisbury, co-founder of Nexigen and creator of the smartLINK network, is one of the driving forces behind making Greater Cincinnati the first "smart" region in the country.

In this video from TechRepublic, Salisbury talks about how smart cities can create revenue and become self-sustaining based on looking for projects that add value, cut costs or create profit.

Salisbury gives examples like linkNYC, another kiosk company, that was able to sustain itself because of money being dumped into it but that he says is an ultimate failure because the city couldn't support it. However, linkNYC has been a learning experience for all involved.

On the other hand, Copenhagen has a smart city data exchange that works like the stock market, where data is put out there and customers can purchase that data. The companies selling the data receives a cut, and the city of Copenhagen gets a portion of that as well and has become self-sustaining.

 

Cladwell helps consumers buy less and work with what they already own

Cladwell, a locally designed clothing app, aims to help its users create a capsule wardrobe out of timeless pieces, rather than investing in fast-fashion. The app doesn't encourage users to go out and buy something new, but to make new outfits of pieces they already own.

To read more about other startups that are helping consumers buy less and utilize their closets in new ways, click here.

 

Eater teamed up with Polly Campbell to find the city's best new restaurants


Eater recently hooked up with Cincinnati Enquirer food writer Polly Campbell to get a snapshot of the hottest new restaurants and bars in town.

Her picks are: This is the first time Eater has explored Cincinnati's food and dining scene. 

To read more about Polly's Eater picks, click here.

 
263 entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All
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