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Education + Learning : Cincinnati In The News

160 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All

"Choice amenities" like Washington Park are changing urban landscape across U.S.


Michael Gaughan, a director with the National Development Council, writes a column on the Governing Magazine web site today discussing how new ideas and players are coalescing to provide attractive options for the livability of cities, saying that's good news for economic development. He includes Washington Park on a short list of examples of urban projects centering on new forms of recreation and mobility that often have a blurry distinction.

"More recently, a new movement has taken hold that is creating an equally powerful set of amenities for today's city-dwellers," Gaughan writes. "A hallmark of this transformation has been an interdisciplinary approach in which transportation departments and public/private developers are as important to recreation as parks departments have long been. For economic-development professionals, this evolution requires further expansion in the definition of what constitutes an urban amenity as well as who should be recruited for growth partnerships."

Read the full Governing Magazine column here.
 

Miami, XU, UC and NKU ranked in Forbes' top 650 colleges


Forbes is out with its annual rankings of U.S. colleges and universities, focusing more than ever on the hot topic of a college degree's return on investment — which it says differentiates its rankings from U.S. News & World Report, among others.

Miami University was the top Cincinnati area college, ranking 167 overall, ahead of Xavier University at 315, University of Cincinnati at 381 and Northern Kentucky University at 626. Other notable area rankings include Indiana University at 112, Ohio State University at 155, University of Dayton at 220, University of Kentucky at 319 and Ohio University at 407.

"While the cost of U.S. higher education escalates, there’s a genuine silver lining in play," Caroline Howard writes in the intro to "America's Top Colleges Ranking 2015." "A growing number of colleges and universities are now focusing on student-consumer value over marketing prestige, making this a new age of return-on-investment education. This pivot is the result of intense public scrutiny on the substantial cost of a degree vs. long tail worth — the very heart of Forbes' definitive Top Colleges ranking, now in its eighth year."

Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity to rank the top 650 schools on what Howard says distinguishes is "our belief in 'output' over 'input.' We’re not all that interested in what gets a student into college, like our peers who focus heavily on selectivity metrics such as high school class rank, SAT scores and the like. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting out of college?"

Forbes' rankings score colleges on post-graduate success (32.5% of grade), student satisfaction (25%), student debt (25%), academic success (10%) and graduation rate (7.5%).

Read the full Forbes article and rankings here.
 

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup


The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.
 

Fodor's ranks Cincinnati Zoo in top 10 U.S. zoos


Fodor's, one of the best-known names in travel guides, has published its list of the 10 best U.S. zoos and included Cincinnati Zoo.

"These ten zoos deliver local wildlife experiences where endangered species are nurtured, ferocious predators are kept within feet of the public, and a renaissance of education in conservation and science is incorporated throughout, promising fun for the whole family," the list's introduction says.

Cincinnati Zoo is praised for its animal demonstrations and talks; choice opportunities to feed giraffes and watch elephants bathe and cheetahs run; and for being the nation's second oldest zoo.

"(Cincinnati) zoo has a long history of animal conservation and animal awareness initiatives, including Project Saving Species, a fund that channels money throughout the world to projects dedicated to animal welfare," the story says.

Check out the full list here.
 

Cincinnati's police reform after 2001 riots is a national model


Cincinnati Police reforms resulting from a U.S. Justice Dept. consent decree after the 2001 riots here are in the news every time another major city undergoes soul-searching following the death of an African American at the hands of police. The latest news story was about Cleveland's own consent decree from the Justice Dept. that will attempt to clean up a broken relationship between that city's police and its citizens.

"Cincinnati’s lessons seem newly relevant as officials call for police reform in the aftermath of the deaths of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Michael Brown in Ferguson and Tamir Rice in Cleveland," Alana Semuels writes in The Atlantic. "Indeed, the recently released report from President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing recommends that departments adopt some of the strategies used by Cincinnati. A task force convened by Ohio Governor John Kasich cited Cincinnati as a model for community-oriented policing and recommended that other law-enforcement agencies in that state develop similar reforms."

Semuels offers a long, nuanced story about the long path the Cincinnati Police Dept. has traveled from its own broken community relationship to today's role as "a model for community-oriented policing." Things aren't perfect here by any stretch, as the rash of recent shootings have some questioning if the police are still on the right path.

Still, "for a great many other cities, Cincinnati’s imperfect present provides a glimpse of a much better future," Semuels writes.

Read the full story here.
 

New data analytics focus makes Cincinnati "the city of the future"


The City of Cincinnati's new approach to using data analytics to make city government more efficient and effective, championed by City Manager Harry Black, "turns tradition on its head" and "might start a national trend," according to a new article on Backchannel, a tech-focused subsite at Medium.com.

Backchannel praises Black and Chief Performance Office Chad Kenney for the debut of the city's Office of Performance and Data Analytics. Black previously served as Finance Director in Baltimore, where Kenney ran a similar tech-savvy program called CitiStat.

Backchannel contributor Susan Crawford says the genius of Black and Kenney's plan is that they intend to focus on outcomes instead of just outputs, as evidenced by the city's new Open Data portal.

"Outputs are what we can measure. Outcomes are what we really want," Crawford writes. "So what would happen if a city's services were managed, top to bottom, to focus on outcomes rather than outputs? We're about to find out in the great state of Ohio. Cincinnati, the Queen City, whose population is expected to grow to more than 300,000 in 2020 (following years of population flight) is determined to make the crucial shift."

Read the full Backchannel article here.
 

Rare Declaration of Independence copy to be displayed at Museum Center for first time


A rare print of the Declaration of Independence has been in the Cincinnati History Museum's collection for 140 years but will be being displayed in public for the first time at the Cincinnati Museum Center, The New York Times explains in its Arts section.

Known as the Holt Broadside, the document is a version of the Declaration of Independence printed by John Holt in White Plains, N.Y. on July 9, 1776 after New York's provincial congress voted to authorize the declaration. Only three other copies are known to exist.

"The Cincinnati copy originally belonged to Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Conn., who moved in 1810 to Cincinnati, where he founded the city's first pork-packing business," Times writer William Grimes says. "It is not known how he came by the document or how it made its way to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, a predecessor of the Cincinnati History Museum. It languished, cataloged but ignored, until 2010."

The Cincinnati Museum Center issued a press release today about the Holt Broadside, announcing it would be displayed for the first time as part of its exhibition Treasures of Our Military Past, opening May 15. The communication sheds light on where the Holt Broadside has been all this time, perhaps taking exception to the Times' characterization of it "languishing" and being "ignored."

"How the Holt broadside ended up in the Cincinnati History Library and Archives at Cincinnati Museum Center is fairly well documented," the Museum Center says. "On the back of the document is the signature of Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Connecticut, who brought the document, along with his family, across the mountains and down the Ohio River to settle in Cincinnati in 1810. ... Following his death in 1837, his estate, including the broadside, was divided among his living children. One of his children or grandchildren likely donated the Holt broadside to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, the predecessor of the Cincinnati History Library and Archives. ... A handwritten '18801' in red ink indicates that the document has been in the Society's holdings since the 1870s."

Check out the document for yourself starting on May 15.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Constella Festival is "challenging the misconceptions of classical music"


Cincinnati's annual Constella Festival of Music & Fine Arts is called "the festival that's challenging the misconceptions of classical music" in a preview article published in Huffington Post's Arts & Culture section.

In December Soapbox wrote about founder Tatiana Berman's efforts to expand Constella's reach by employing more digital promotions that "target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati." This Huffington Post piece will certainly help with her goal.

"Unlike the standard classical music circuit — characterized by what Berman's team describes as the 100 concert a year demanding schedule — Constella seeks to, in essence, maintain the intimacy of classical music, but encourage the experimentation and chance-taking," the article says.

The Constella Festival runs April 8-19 at Memorial Hall, Woodward Theatre, Cincinnati Art Museum, SCPA and several other venues. Get festival details and buy tickets here.

Read the full Huffington Post article here.
 

In Cincinnati, they're closing the achievement gap

When educators nationwide want to look at proven ways to turn around a struggling urban school system, this is the city they visit. Over a decade, Cincinnati Public Schools’ graduation rate has jumped from 50 to 80 percent. And in the past five years, the reading and math proficiency of its elementary students has climbed in many schools. Read more.

Lessons from a groundbreaking interdisciplinary design laboratory at UC

Since 2002, the Niehoff Urban Studio at the University of Cincinnati has engaged more than 800 students in projects designed to have a tangible impact on quality of life in Cincinnati. Housed in the Corryville, an historically blighted area abutting the UC campus, the initiative brings students face to face with the environmental consequences of urban poverty. Read more.

UC makes big gains on international student survey rankings

High scores for arrival activities and other improvements help UC jump into the top 40 worldwide in a new survey of international students. Read more.

UC's Health Sciences Library ranked 14th most impressive in the world

The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library was ranked 14th among "the 25 most impressive university medical school libraries in the world" according to The Best Master’s Degrees Reviews and Rankings, a public site that explores and ranks the vast world of Master’s degrees in all the disciplines.

When life throws you Cincinnati, redefine chili

Composer Jennifer Jolley, who earned both her D.M.A. and M.M. at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music discusses her unlikely route from Los Angeles to Cincinnati via Vermont, and why she's glad she landed in the Queen City. Read more.

Ten tri-state schools named Most Challenging High Schools in US

Ten local schools made it onto The Washington Post's list of "American's Most Challenging High Schools" for 2014. Walnut Hills, Wyoming and Indian Hill were ranked top three in Ohio, respectively, while Highlands took the top spot for Kentucky. Walnut Hills was the only area school to break into the top 100 on the list. Find out how the list was compiled and search the results.

Newport Aquarium named a top 10 US aquarium

Newport Aquarium was ranked the No. 9 U.S. aquarium in an article written by US City Traveler’s founder Taylor Goldblatt, whose work has been featured by National Geographic, The New York Times, Lonely Planet, The Washington Post and Travel Channel.
160 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All
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