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Education + Learning : Cincinnati In The News

187 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Local startup Spatial among 12 international companies in auto mobility accelerator


The mobility accelerator operated by Boulder-Color.-based Techstars recently named Cincinnati startup Spatial as one of the 12 companies in its Techstars Mobility Class of 2016. Each is building automotive mobility technologies and services that enable people and goods to move around more freely, according to the announcement posted on Techstars' website.

"The quality of teams and companies applying this year has been incredible," writes Techstars Mobility Managing Director Ted Serbinski. "We saw a world-wide response with applications from 52 countries across 6 continents. There was a 44 percent increase in mobility-focused companies. Most impressive, 50 percent of the 2016 companies include founders with diverse backgrounds."

Spatial uses data from social media platforms to describe the feel of a neighborhood on maps, a big help to people planning trips to cities or areas they aren't familiar with. The startup was part of Ocean's accelerator class earlier this year, graduating in April.

As part of the Techstars Mobility Class, Serbinski says, Spatial will participate in a Sept. 8 demo day "where we expect over 1,000 people to come see and meet these 12 startups."

Techstars has increased its investment relationship with Cintrifuse in recent years and is partnering with Cintrifuse to present its annual FounderCon in Cincinnati in October.

Read the full Techstars blog post here.
 

Mortar turns locals into entrepreneurs in Cincinnati's gentrifying economy


Mortar's nine-week business development program is explained and celebrated in Yes! Magazine, a nonprofit, ad-free online and print publication offering tools for citizen engagement and stories about real people working for a better world.

While Mortar is open to all, Araz Hachadourian writes, the majority of its students are low-income women — like Jasmine Ford, who is featured in the story. After going through the Mortar program and raising funds through a Kiva campaign, Ford is planning to open a storefront bakery, Jazzy Sweeties, in Walnut Hills.

"The (Mortar) idea sprung from founders Derrick Braziel and Allen Woods, who live in Cincinnati’s historic Over-the-Rhine neighborhood," Hachadourian writes. "Once a working-class neighborhood made up mostly of German immigrants, the area was later populated by African Americans arriving during the Great Migration. Most businesses then were bars and small shops.

"Over the years, tech firms moved in and more than $843 million was invested in Over-the-Rhine and the surrounding downtown area, bringing an onslaught of development and new residents. Braziel says the neighborhood still has small businesses, 'but they’re serving a different demographic now.'"

"A lot of the entrepreneurs that we work with operate out of the underground cash economy," Braziel says. "They’re running businesses out of their living room or they’re doing business out of their trunk or they’re hustling in some way, shape, or form. There’s talent all around, what’s lacking is the know-how."

Read the full Yes! Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus to use high-tech tools to fight blight


Next City explores how the Motor City Mapping project, a citywide effort to create a comprehensive property dashboard in Detroit, is now expanding to Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus. Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

"The Detroit Land Bank Authority used the data to make decisions about which houses to save versus tear down," Lee Chilcote writes. "Officials also inventoried vacant and occupied properties for the first time, concentrating their efforts on tearing down vacant homes and preventing residents who are behind on their taxes from losing their homes."

The same technology is coming to Ohio thanks to a $1 million grant from JPMorgan Chase to the Western Reserve Land Conservancy that will allow the agency to create property dashboards for Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus. WRLC will work with Detroit-based Loveland Technologies, which developed the Motor City Mapping project.

Loveland founder and CEO Jerry Paffendorf says the technology has been a game changer for Detroit because it's "the most accurate thing that exists as far as getting a look at occupancy, vacancy and condition" of properties.

"With information in a single, easy-to-use interface that is updated in real-time, Detroit residents can get a much more accurate picture of the condition of their neighborhoods," the story says, which will be the same for Cincinnati neighborhoods.

Read the full Next City story here.
 

Avondale program shows how the arts contribute to creating more equitable places


Local arts leader Margy Waller has published a report about her painting project in Avondale on Americans for the Arts' ArtsBlog. It's her fifth blog post in 2016 related to her involvement with the organization's New Community Visions Initiative, a two-year effort to explore the role of community-based arts enabling organizations, funders, cultural institutions and artists in shaping the future of local arts in the U.S.

Waller's new blog post asks how the arts can contribute to creating more equitable places and offers her Avondale experience as an example of success.

"Leaders at two of the area hospitals seem to recognize the damage done to the neighborhood (by large institutions replacing homes with office buildings and parking lots) and are looking for ways to connect with residents, bridging and bonding with the community, creating a stronger place for all," she writes. "These leaders called for a partner to create an experience, having in mind something like the ArtWalks — community inspired and co-created crosswalk murals — we’ve created in other neighborhoods."

The resulting painting project at Gabriel's Place, Waller says, "might seem a small thing. But, no. Co-creating the art is a major happiness element, enhancing quality of life and connecting the neighborhood residents to people working at the encroaching institutions. Recognizing the damage done, the racist and privileged actions over decades, is large."

Read Margy Waller's full blog post here.
 

Cincinnati and Columbus have recovered recession job losses, Cleveland not so much


Cincinnati and Columbus have regained the jobs each metro area lost during the 2007-09 recession, says a United States Conference of Mayors' report based on Labor Department and other government data. Cleveland won't recover all its recession-era job losses for nearly two more years.

The three metro areas represent Ohio's largest labor markets, each with more than 1 million jobs.

"Though the Cleveland area lags its large metro counterparts in recovering jobs, it will bounce back before some other areas in the state," Olivera Perkins writes in The Cleveland Plain Dealer. "For example, the Dayton and Toledo areas aren't projected to recover their lost jobs until after 2021."

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 

Oyler School a good example of how "community schools" help improve student outcomes


A blog post from the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) says that more and more cities are trying community schools that wrap health, dental, therapeutic and family support services around existing schools to try to mitigate the effects of poverty and thereby improve students’ learning and life prospects.

"This idea is not new," Paul Hill writes. "Its modern incarnation started in Cincinnati in the early 2000s and has now spread to New York City and Philadelphia."

Hill praises Oyler School in Lower Price Hill as "the great community schools exemplar in Cincinnati," saying anyone who visits "is sure to be moved and impressed."

Martin Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, praised Oyler School last fall on The Huffington Post.

The Center on Reinventing Public Education is a research and policy analysis center at the University of Washington Bothell developing systemwide solutions for K–12 public education.

Read the full CRPE blog post here.
 

Contemporary Arts Center was one of Zaha Hadid's most striking designs, says New York Times


The New York Times offers a tribute to architect Zaha Hadid, who died March 31 at age 65, by highlighting her seven most striking designs, including the Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts downtown.

The former Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp, one of Hadid’s great champions, famously wrote of the new CAC facility in 2003: "Might as well blurt it out: The Rosenthal Center is the most important American building to be completed since the end of the Cold War."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

KPMG study shows Cincinnati as most cost-friendly business location among large U.S. cities


Cincinnati is the most cost-friendly city to do business among the 31 largest U.S. metro areas, according to the recently released 2016 Competitive Alternatives study by audit, tax and advisory firm KPMG.

Favorable leasing costs and low property taxes contributed to Cincinnati's first place ranking in the study, which compares 26 key cost components in each market — including costs associated with taxes, labor, facilities, transportation and utilities — as they apply to seven different business-to-business service sector operations and 12 different manufacturing sector operations.

"Many factors go into site selection decisions, and a study such as ours helps businesses, city leaders and economic development teams begin to consider investments that should ultimately be good for the community and good for business," says Ulrich Schmidt, a managing director in KPMG's Global Location and Expansion Services practice, which helps companies that are expanding, relocating or consolidating their facilities.

Read the full KPMG report here.
 

Forbes rates Cincinnati as #15 best U.S. city for recent college grads


College graduates today face better job prospects than those from a few years ago but are typically saddled by student loan debt, Forbes magazine writes, so "they would be wise to consider carefully where to start their careers."

To find out which cities offer the best overall prospects for college-educated workers with five years of experience or less, Forbes has crunched data on job growth, unemployment rates, pay and cost of living in America’s largest 100 metro areas. Its resulting 2016 list of the 20 Best Cities for Young Professionals includes Cincinnati at #15.

The top cities, according to Forbes, are either job-heavy economic powerhouses where the pay is high and the cost of living is too (places like San Francisco at #1 and Silicon Valley at #2) or underrated mid-tier markets where the pay is still decent but the cost of living is a relative bargain.

According to the numbers, Cincinnati's median salary for college grads with 0-5 years experience is $50,800; the population with bachelor's degree is 31.44%; the average yearly job growth (2015-2017) is 1.96%; and the cost of living is 8.17% below the national average.

Two regional cities finished ahead of Cincinnati — Columbus at #7 and Indianapolis at #10.

Read the full Forbes list and methodology here.
 

Cincinnati ranked #4 healthiest U.S. city thanks to "highly rated" doctors


The Better Doctors website ranks the best doctors across the U.S. via a data-driven algorithm that accounts for a doctor's education, experience and referral network, and occasionally the site uses its data to tell related stories.

Last week the site ranked the 50 largest U.S. cities according to four criteria: the American Fitness Index of residents' fitness and general health, the percentage of residents with health coverage, the number of physicians per 1,000 residents and (the secret sauce) the percentage of doctors in each city "that are highly rated according to Better Doctor's comprehensive, seven-variable algorithm."

Cincinnati is ranked #4, up from #10 last year "with a large increase in highly rated doctors and relatively high ranking in all other categories," according to the story. The top three ranked cities are Minneapolis, Washington D.C. and Boston.

Better Doctors says it obtained data from the American Fitness Index, U.S. Census and its own proprietary data, coming up with a score for each city that weighted AFI at 40% of the overall score, the percentage of highly rated doctors at 20%, the number of primary care physicians per 1,000 residents at 20% and the percentage of residents with health insurance at 20%.

Read the full Better Doctor ratings here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

New study says Cincinnati among best U.S. cities for prosperity and inclusion over past 5 years


A new Metro Monitor report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program ranks the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas by growth, prosperity and inclusion during the recovery from the recession. Greater Cincinnati is in the top 20 for both prosperity and inclusion while sitting in the middle of the pack for overall growth.

The Atlantic's CityLab urban issues website summarizes the report's findings and provides links to all the charts, graphs and data metrics. One key takeaway is that, when analyzing the number trends from 2009 to 2014, city growth didn't necessarily equal prosperity for all of its residents.

Besides charting growth — GMP, jobs and aggregate wages — the report analyzes how that growth translates to individual prosperity, based on productivity, average annual wages and average standard of living. It also looks as whether that growth and prosperity includes all people across income and race brackets.

Read the full CityLab story and access the Brookings Metro Monitor report here.
 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 
187 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All
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