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Education + Learning : Cincinnati In The News

175 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

New study says Cincinnati among best U.S. cities for prosperity and inclusion over past 5 years


A new Metro Monitor report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program ranks the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas by growth, prosperity and inclusion during the recovery from the recession. Greater Cincinnati is in the top 20 for both prosperity and inclusion while sitting in the middle of the pack for overall growth.

The Atlantic's CityLab urban issues website summarizes the report's findings and provides links to all the charts, graphs and data metrics. One key takeaway is that, when analyzing the number trends from 2009 to 2014, city growth didn't necessarily equal prosperity for all of its residents.

Besides charting growth — GMP, jobs and aggregate wages — the report analyzes how that growth translates to individual prosperity, based on productivity, average annual wages and average standard of living. It also looks as whether that growth and prosperity includes all people across income and race brackets.

Read the full CityLab story and access the Brookings Metro Monitor report here.
 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Co-ops are an old alternative to the new app-based economy


Companies like Uber drive money out of local communities and erase the benefits that employees have fought hard for, Alex Morgan writes in Governing Magazine. Co-ops could slow that shift.

Morgan cites the example of a city like Cincinnati adopting a co-op ride-sharing model as a way for people to keep their dollars in their own communities.

"Taxi drivers in, say, Cincinnati (perhaps those already driving for Uber or Lyft) could band together and start a co-op service with its own app that might be called Big Red Ride," he writes. "Members could keep the 20 to 30 percent Uber would otherwise get and use that money to not only undercut Uber on price but also to provide Big Red Ride’s driver-owners with health insurance, vacation time and so on."

Morgan thinks the ongoing shift to an app-based economy is pushing communities to a real crossroads.

"Unless current trends are countered ... this new economy has the potential to return us to a very old economy, a pre-Industrial Revolution one in which merchants put out work at meager piece rates to families and individuals," he writes. "Co-ops are flexible because at their core is not technology but a set of legally defined relationships. The owners, or members, have control, not outside investors. People vote, not money."

Xavier University hosted a conference on the co-op movement in November, which Soapbox previewed here. Xavier will host a follow-up conference, The Cooperative Economy: Building a More Sustainable Future, April 21-22 at its on-campus Cintas Center.

Would Cincy Red Bike be interested in starting a ride-sharing co-op?

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Stop letting starchitects ruin college campuses, including UC, says Project for Public Spaces


The University of Cincinnati received national attention from The New York Times in September for its focus on "starchitecture" in building new facilities on campus — a series of striking structures designed by high-profile architects. The new buildings have helped raise UC's national profile but contribute greatly to its $1.1 billion debt load; still, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent over the past 10 years.

The Project for Public Spaces has published an opinion piece that says such "build it and they will come" approaches are ruining college campuses. The nonprofit planning, design and educational organization describes itself as "dedicated to helping people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities."

College tuition has been on the rise for 40 years, the article says, but rather than cutting costs colleges are spending more and more money on their exterior aesthetics.

"One of the boldest examples comes from the University of Cincinnati, which has enlisted a 'murderers' row' of architects to redesign their campus, including Frank Gehry, Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Bernard Tschumi, and Thom Mayne," Project for Public Spaces says. "This adds up to a lot of shiny new buildings, including the crown jewel — Mr. Mayne’s exorbitant $112.9 million Campus Recreation Center, which opened in 2006. But there’s even more in the works: UC's Department of Athletics has requested a $70 million renovation of the basketball arena, which, if approved, will open in 2017."

The article then points out that academic spending per full-time undergraduate student at UC dropped 24 percent between 2005 and 2013 "while its professors earn salaries that rank far below those at similar research institutions."

Read the full Project for Public Spaces story here.
 

Did Kentucky governor's race kill political polling?


Politicians like to say that the only poll that matters is on Election Day. That's starting to be more true, according to analysis in Governing Magazine.

Writer Alan Greenblatt points out that polls in the Kentucky governor's race consistently showed Democrat Jack Conway with a slight lead over Republican Matt Bevin. Not only did Bevin win, but it wasn't even close, as he took 53 percent of the vote to Conway's 44 percent.

The day after the election, The Lexington Herald-Leader announced it would dump Survey USA as its pollster.

"We might as well buy monkeys and dartboards vs. what we had here with Survey USA," Greenblatt quotes Kentucky Republican consultant Scott Jennings.

"The problems aren't limited to the Bluegrass State," the article says. "Last year, polls around the country underestimated the Republican strength in several Senate races, as well as the governor's race in Wisconsin. Conversely, in 2012, the Gallup Poll showed Mitt Romney beating Barack Obama in the presidential election."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

UC professors discover possible "gateway to civilizations" in Greece


A grave discovered this spring by Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker, a husband-and-wife team in the University of Cincinnati's Department of Classics, is yielding artifacts that The New York Times says "could be a gateway" to explain the earliest development of Ancient Greek culture.

"Probably not since the 1950s have we found such a rich tomb," James C. Wright, director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, told The Times. "You can count on one hand the number of tombs as wealthy as this one," echoed Thomas M. Brogan, director of the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete.

The article says Davis and Stocker have been excavating near the Greek coastal city of Pylos for 25 years and were surprised to find such an impressive site basically right under their noses.

"It is indeed mind boggling that we were first," Davis wrote in an email to The Times. "I'm still shaking my head in disbelief. So many walked over it so many times, including our own team."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

25 years later: Cincinnati and Mapplethorpe


Cincinnati writer/artist Grace Dobush has a well-researched and well-written story in today's Washington Post about this weekend's activity at the Contemporary Arts Center celebrating the 25th anniversary of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's infamous Perfect Moment exhibition at the CAC. Events and the symposium continue through tomorrow; see the full schedule here.

Dobush does a nice job reminding readers of the local tumult in 1990, centering around the prosecution of the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and their subsequent acquittal by a Hamilton County jury. She also discusses Cincinnati's slow recovery from the culture wars that created an atmosphere where art could be prosecuted as obscenity.

"When Chris Seelbach became Cincinnati’s first openly gay City Council member in 2011 ... Cincinnati’s score on the Human Rights Council’s Municipal Equality Index, which evaluates cities on support for LGBT populations, was 68," Dobush writes. "As of 2014, it was a perfect 100. And Cincinnati son Jim Obergefell was at the center of the landmark Supreme Court decision this year to legalize gay marriage."

Interviews include Seelbach, CAC Director Raphaela Platow, Source Cincinnati's Julie Calvert, former Mercantile Library Director Albert Pyle and Vice Mayor David Mann. Great job, Grace!

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

When art fought the law in Cincinnati and art won


This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Contemporary Arts Center's Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, The Perfect Moment, that resulted in obscenity charges against the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and ultimately their exoneration by a Hamilton County jury. Smithsonian Magazine does a good job recapping the 1990 events and trying to explain how Cincinnati — the arts community and the city in general — has evolved since then.

Writer Alex Palmer interviews Barrie and his lead defense attorney, Lou Sirkin, to provide memories of the 1990 events as well as current CAC Director Raphaela Platow and Curator Steven Matijcio for "what does it mean today" context.
 
"The case has left a positive legacy for the CAC, and for Barrie, who went on to help defend offensive song lyrics at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum," Palmer writes. "'People see the CAC as a champion of the arts,' says Matijcio. 'We're still always trying to be challenging and topical, to draw on work that's relevant and of the moment.'"

The CAC commemorates the 25th anniversary with a series of programs and exhibitions, starting with a "Mapplethorpe + 25" symposium Oct. 23-24.

Read the full Smithsonian Magazine story here.
 

How a fiddler and an astrophysicist introduced predictive analytics to Cincinnati


Backchannel, a tech-focused subsite at Medium.com, is back at it, heaping praise on the city of Cincinnati's efforts to lead the charge toward the future of local government by integrating data into its daily operations. The praise is centered on Ed Cunningham, head of the city's building code enforcement operations who also happens to be front man and fiddle player for Comet Bluegrass All-Stars.

Back in April, Backchannel writer Susan Crawford used glowing terms to describe how City Manager Harry Black and Chief Performance Officer Chad Kenney built the city's Office of Performance and Data Analytics. With this new story she revisits Cincinnati's newfound fascination with data, focusing on Cunningham's experiments with Predictive Blight Prevention.

"Even if you aren’t immediately eager to read another column about Cincinnati, keep going," Crawford writes. "Like other good stories, this one has drama, memorable characters, sudden bursts of insight, and a cliffhanger ending that hints at future episodes. It also has a soundtrack."

Read the full Backchannel article here.
 

Oyler School's role in transforming Lower Price Hill praised by national education leader


"Imagine an old, abandoned end unit row house that is tall, slender in build, and neglected in infrastructure," writes Martin J. Blank, President of the Institute for Educational Leadership, in The Huffington Post's education blog. "For many years it's been a crack house, filled with needles — a revolving door of drugs and criminal activity. The back of this house overlooks a local schoolyard, where neighborhood children and youth come to learn and play. The house stands in contrast to a beautiful rebuilt school and is a reminder of the challenges students, educators, families, and the community face daily."

Blank then describes how the house offered an opportunity to be part of the amazing transformation of Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati thanks to the reconstruction of Oyler Community Learning Center.

Titled "What Happens When a Crack House Becomes an Early Childhood Learning Center?" the blog post describes how Oyler leaders helped renovate the house to become a neighborhood pre-school center.

The Robert & Adele Schiff Early Learning Center opened late last year, expanding a program that Oyler began by housing it inside the school.

Public radio education reporter Amy Scott premiered her documentary film about the same Lower Price Hill experiment, Oyler, in May at the school. It's screening Thursday night at the 2015 Cincinnati Film Festival.

Read the full Huffington Post column here.
 

U.S. News ranks Ohio State as top area college, followed by IU and Miami


U.S. News & World Report is out with its latest college rankings, which the magazine suggests "provide an excellent starting point ... for families concerned with finding the best academic value for their money."

After the listings intro states, "The host of intangibles that makes up the college experience can't be measured by a series of data points," USN&WR does just that. And how do the data points add up for area schools?

In the "National Universities" category, Ohio State is the first area school at #52. Other area institutions include Indiana University at 75, Miami University 82, University of Dayton 108, University of Kentucky 129, Ohio University 135 and University of Cincinnati 140.

In the "Regional Universities" category, the Midwest features Xavier at #6 and Mount St. Joseph at 68. The South includes Thomas More at 53 and NKU 80.

In the "National Liberal Arts Colleges" category, the region's highest ranked school is Oberlin at 23, followed by Kenyon 25, Centre 45, Denison 55, Earlham 61 and Berea 67.

Forbes magazine released its own college rankings last month, with Miami, Indiana and Ohio State as the highest rated area schools as well, but in that order.

See the full U.S. News & World Report rankings here.
 

New York Times celebrates "Cincinnati Starchitecture" on UC campus


This week's New York Times Magazine presents "The Education Issue," a collection of thought-provoking stories with headlines like "A Prescription for More Black Doctors," "Why We Should Fear University, Inc." and "What Is the Point of College?" The online headline that caught our attention, though, was for a slideshow called "Cincinnati Starchitecture."

The University of Cincinnati campus is featured in 14 very nice photos as a playground for renowned architects, from the recently unveiled renovation of Nippert Stadium to various academic, recreation and dorm buildings. It's an amazing tribute to the school on a very high-profile web site.

See the New York Times slideshow here.

UPDATE: The Times has added an accompanying feature story to the slideshow, "If You Build It, They Will Come ... Won't They?" The story describes how UC is trying to raise its profile through a risky (but increasingly common) investment: expensive architecture.

"The university now has $1.1 billion in debt — close to 20 percent more than it had in 2004 — largely because of its construction boom," the story says. "During the same time, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent. The spending is predicated on the idea that new buildings can help turn provincial universities into outre, worldly 'academical villages.' It's a financial gamble — one that many public institutions find themselves driven to make."
 

NKY's Judge David Bunning "has guts," Washington Post reports


The Washington Post is among the national media covering the drama in a federal courthouse in Ashland, Ky., where Judge David Bunning jailed Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for her refusal to issue marriage licenses in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling legalizing same-sex marriage.

Bunning is a Ft. Thomas resident, graduate of Newport Central Catholic High School and son of former U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning. This case has thrust him into the national media glare.

"After hearing both sides inside a federal courtroom in Ashland, Ky., the 49-year-old judge made his decision: The devout Catholic and son of former U.S. senator and Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Bunning became the first U.S. judge to issue a jail sentence to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling that made gay marriage legal across the country," The Post explains in a profile story published this morning.

"Bunning's decision Thursday came at a pivotal juncture in the gay marriage debate that has divided the country along starkly partisan lines. But notably, it has been the decisions of a Republican judge appointed by a Republican president, George W. Bush, in a conservative state that have halted the latest effort to use religious freedom objections to the ruling."

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

Cincinnati Public Library improves to fifth busiest in U.S.


The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County checked out more than 18 million items in 2014, making it the fifth busiest public library system in the U.S., according to a new Public Library Data Service statistical report. In last year’s report (2013 usage data), the Library was the sixth busiest library in the U.S.

The 2015 report is based on survey responses collected from more than 1,800 public libraries in the U.S. and Canada for fiscal year 2014. It's published each year by the Public Library Association, the largest division of the American Library Association.

Read the full Cincinnati Business Courier story here.
 
175 Education + Learning Articles | Page: | Show All
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