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Over-the-Rhine : Cincinnati In The News

285 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All

Cintrifuse lauded for its work with startups and entrepreneurs


Cintrifuse is getting national attention for its work with Cincinnati-based startups and entrepreneurs from Industry Week.

Cintrifuse manages a 38,000-square-foot building in Over-the-Rhine, and works with startups and local entrepreneurs in a number of capacities. Its CEO Wendy Lea says it is part accelerator, part incubator and part co-working space.

She would like to see Cintrifuse expand on the national and international level, much like TechStars in Boulder, Colo. TechStars held its annual reunion of graduates, called FounderCon, earlier this fall in Cincinnati.

Read the full story here.

 

Findlay Market named one of the best places in America


Findlay Market has been named one of five Great Public Spaces by the American Planning Association. On Oct. 3 it made the 2016 “Great Places in America” list. 
 
During National Community Planning Month, the APA recognizes public spaces that demonstrate exceptional character, quality and planning that enrich communities, facilitate economic growth and inspire others around the country.

A public space must embody eight characteristics to be considered for the award: promotes human contact and social activities; is safe, welcoming and accommodating for all users; has design and architectural features that are visually interesting; promotes community involvement; reflects the local culture or history; relates well to bordering uses; is well maintained; and has a unique or special character.

Home to 42 full-time individual merchants and more than 50 additional outdoor vendors and farmers on Saturdays and Sundays, Findlay Market is the only surviving municipal market house of the nine public markets operating in Cincinnati in the 19th and early 20th century.

Read more about it.

Walk through Findlay Market reveals 40 vendors & restaurants


Findlay Market is getting lots of attention this summer as new developments crop up around it and the streetcar opening looms near. USA Today recently named it one of the top U.S. food markets.

USA Today now has compiled a virtual "tour" of Findlay Market, complete with photos of vendors, merchants and restaurants. If you can't make it to the market, this tour is for you.

Take the full virtual tour here.
 

Findlay Market named among nation's top historic food markets


Findlay Market was recently named one of the top food markets in the country by USA Today. Opened in 1855, Findlay Market is the oldest continuously operating market in the United States.

The market has a plethora of indoor vendors as well as farmers market stands set up outside on the weekends. Model Group is currently developing retail space and apartments around the market, with new businesses expected to open in these spaces.

You can find out more about Findlay Market, and others like it, here.
 

Artichoke OTR rated one of the 10 great U.S. cookware shops


The Food Network website is featuring Artichoke among the 10 great cookware shops in the U.S. in a listicle titled "Where Cooks Shop." The Over-the-Rhine store opened a few months ago just north of Findlay Market on Elm Street.

Andrea Strong highlights "finds for your kitchen at these cook-approved spots around the country," which include independently-owned shops in Brooklyn, Chicago and Philadelphia in addition to Artichoke.

Read the full Food Network list here.
 

New York Times does Cincinnati on a budget


The New York Times' "Frugal Traveler" section visits Cincinnati via a new report from Lucas Peterson, who takes in "a former boomtown that was once called the 'Paris of America' because of its inspired architecture and ambitious engineering projects."

"I discovered that Cincinnati has a complicated and fascinating history that bridges (quite literally) the Northern and Southern United States," he writes. "There are, of course, great opportunities for the budget-conscious traveler: gorgeous buildings, interesting museums, open-air markets and good food, including Cincinnati's famous chili."

Peterson tries Skyline in Clifton and Camp Washington Chili, spends time at Findlay Market and Museum Center at Union Terminal and experiences a transcendent moment at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

"There’s an odd quietness in the (slave) pen, which visitors are allowed to enter: an almost ghostly chill," he writes. "It's a potent piece of history, and one of the more impressive artifacts I've encountered in any museum, anywhere."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnati is home to unique food and drink not found elsewhere


Cincinnati is known for goetta, Skyline Chili and of course, beer, but those aren't the only things putting the city on the map. Chefs like Todd Kelly and restaurateurs like Jeff Ruby strive to provide diners with something different and tasty each time they visit.

Whether it's a five-star dining experience you seek or an ice cold pint, you're sure to find it in Cincinnati.

Read the full USA Today story here.

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 

Streetcars: If you build it, will they come?


Slow to build and expensive to operate, streetcars could be the most maligned mode of transportation in America, Governing Magazine says in its June issue, but cities keep building them.

This could be a banner year for streetcar openings, Daniel Vock writes, with a total of eight streetcar projects opening or about to come online, including five in cities with no previous service: Cincinnati; Detroit; Kansas City, Mo.; St. Louis; and Washington, D.C.

"What generally distinguishes streetcars from light rail is that streetcars are smaller, travel in traffic, have shorter routes and make more frequent stops," he writes. "Light rail is built to move people between neighborhoods, while streetcars typically help people get around within neighborhoods. Although the distinctions may seem small, they help explain why streetcars seem to get a lot more criticism than light rail projects, even though both have proliferated rapidly in recent years."

The most emulated streetcar system in the country is Portland’s, Vock says, and a "pilgrimage to Portland is virtually a prerequisite for any city leader serious about building a streetcar system at home. Cincinnati’s delegation has visited Portland 39 times because it’s an example of how a streetcar can both improve transportation and create a vibrant neighborhood out of an overlooked industrial area."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Mortar turns locals into entrepreneurs in Cincinnati's gentrifying economy


Mortar's nine-week business development program is explained and celebrated in Yes! Magazine, a nonprofit, ad-free online and print publication offering tools for citizen engagement and stories about real people working for a better world.

While Mortar is open to all, Araz Hachadourian writes, the majority of its students are low-income women — like Jasmine Ford, who is featured in the story. After going through the Mortar program and raising funds through a Kiva campaign, Ford is planning to open a storefront bakery, Jazzy Sweeties, in Walnut Hills.

"The (Mortar) idea sprung from founders Derrick Braziel and Allen Woods, who live in Cincinnati’s historic Over-the-Rhine neighborhood," Hachadourian writes. "Once a working-class neighborhood made up mostly of German immigrants, the area was later populated by African Americans arriving during the Great Migration. Most businesses then were bars and small shops.

"Over the years, tech firms moved in and more than $843 million was invested in Over-the-Rhine and the surrounding downtown area, bringing an onslaught of development and new residents. Braziel says the neighborhood still has small businesses, 'but they’re serving a different demographic now.'"

"A lot of the entrepreneurs that we work with operate out of the underground cash economy," Braziel says. "They’re running businesses out of their living room or they’re doing business out of their trunk or they’re hustling in some way, shape, or form. There’s talent all around, what’s lacking is the know-how."

Read the full Yes! Magazine story here.
 

Japp's recognized by Esquire as one of the "best bars in America"


Molly Wellmann and her Japp's establishment on Main Street get high praise from Esquire Magazine's David Wondrich, who includes the Over-the-Rhine gem on his list of the 18 best bars in America.

Wondrich writes about the revolution he's witnessed over 11 years as Esquire's Drinks Correspondent, where most U.S. cities are now supporting craft cocktail bars that are full.

"People are paying double to drink in them, and they're not outraged," he writes. "They're coming back, over and over. They're putting their phones away (well, mostly), forgetting about the game, doing their best to act sober. (In my years of visiting these joints, I've rarely seen anybody visibly intoxicated — tipsy, sure; drunk, uncool.) The bartenders, their mustachioed, inked hipsterdom aside, are generally studious and hardworking (if perhaps too devoted to making things by hand that really don't need to be). All of this while the media and the political class are hyperventilating about the irreparable decline of America."

Wondrich suggests getting a Cool Jules at Japp's, "a gin-and-port stunner." Unless it's Tiki night, "in which case, pick something rummy from the chalkboard."

Read the full Esquire Magazine list here.
 

Over-the-Rhine is Cincinnati's booming foodie neighborhood


The Chicago Tribune's travel section features a nice guide to Over-the-Rhine dining options, saying, "Eating in the so-called OTR starts — but doesn't necessarily stop — in the 1300 block of Vine Street, which has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past decade. You can do breakfast, lunch and dinner without leaving the block."

Spots highlighted include Holtman's Donuts (the story features a photo of staffer DeShawn Ashley holding a tray of donuts), The Eagle, Pontiac BBQ, Quan Hapa, Graeter's and Findlay Market.

Read the full Chicago Tribune story here.
 

Want a bike-friendly city? Get ready to fail until it works, says Wired


Here's a fascinating article from Wired about building a bike-friendly culture in cities. Although it doesn't specifically mention Cincinnati, its findings and recommendations definitely apply to us.

"Building any infrastructure, anywhere, is a pain in the neck," writes Aarian Marshall. "You've got to find exactly the right government agencies, community groups, funding sources and contractors. And then you've got to figure out the logistics of construction and worry about the inevitable delays and cost overruns."

But Marshall then says not to despair, that there's good news for our soon-to-be bicycling-loving cities. "Across the country, usually stodgy governments are trying quick and dirty pilot projects, putting down cheap and temporary bicycle infrastructure and giving it a literal test drive (well, ride) before committing to the big stuff."

Like bike-only lanes along Central Parkway?

"Laying down temporary infrastructure before ginning up anything permanent also provides an opportunity to convince skeptics about the upsides of bike travel," Marshall writes. "Demonstration projects go a long way in terms of alleviating fears. Once residents see bicycle infrastructure in action, he says, they (usually) decide it doesn’t take up too much room or cost too much money. That makes it politically easier to build permanent protected lanes, bike boxes and signals."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Cincinnati's never-used subway is 100 years old this month


"In 1916, the people of Cincinnati voted to fund the construction of a subway that would revolutionize the city’s public transportation system," Scott Rodd writes at the Next City website. "One hundred years later, all that remains is a 2-mile stretch of abandoned tunnels below the declining Rust Belt city."

Rodd goes on to relate the fascinating story of how Cincinnati approved $6 million in bonds to build a subway "loop" centered in downtown only to have a subsequent mayor halt the project mid-stream, leaving abandoned tunnels and tracks under Central Parkway to this day. Foreshadowing, perhaps, for the Cincinnati Streetcar loop, which was almost halted a few years ago by newly-elected Mayor John Cranley? Instead, the streetcar starts public operations later this year.

(Note to Rodd: Cincinnati is a "declining Rust Belt city?" Dude, you need to get a clue from national reports like this, this and this of Cincinnati's renaissance and rejuvenation ...and those are from just the past week.)

The Ohio Department of Transportation eventually built large portions of Interstates 71 and 75 in urban Cincinnati on land the state had originally purchased for the subway loop, saving money by avoiding right-of-way acquisitions and eminent domain but forever destroying rail transit routes.

Read the full Next City story here.
 
285 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All
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