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Cincinnati In The News

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Cincinnati lags behind other Midwestern cities for immigrants establishing roots


Coastal cities such as Los Angeles, Miami and New York have long been viewed as the gateways for immigrants starting new lives in America, Governing Magazine says, but the best immigrant-friendly strategies these days are to be found in the Midwest.

“Places like Indianapolis and Columbus and Dayton, Ohio, have pursued a wide range of immigrant-friendly strategies, in part to prop up vulnerable economies and stem population losses,” Mike Maciag writes. “Other Rust Belt jurisdictions are joining them.” Cincinnati is not among the top destinations for immigrants, according to the magazine's analysis of U.S. Census data.

“The Midwest is becoming the new gateway,” Guadalupe Velasquez, who coordinates the New American Initiative for the city of Columbus, tells Governing.

Governing compared Census data collected between 2005-2009 with data from 2010-2014 for all cities with populations of at least 100,000. Maciag's story accompanying the data highlights five cities with the best immigrant initiatives: Columbus, Dayton, Detroit, Louisville and Baltimore.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Cincinnati one of America's 10 best new cities for beer lovers


Fortune Magazine has a new feature story about the top 10 U.S. cities with great under-the-radar craft beer scenes, including Cincinnati.

"Other cities are starting to build strong reputations of their own," the story says after citing San Diego, Denver, Portland and San Francisco as national craft beer powerhouses. "To avoid any regional bias, we spoke to people throughout the beer industry — from brewers to hop farmers — to get their take on areas that are showing a lot of potential, though may still be under-the-radar on a national basis."

The craft brewery industry has exploded across Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the story says, and mentions two breweries with large expansions: Rhinegeist in Over-the-Rhine and MadTree, which is preparing to build an $18 million brewery and taproom in Oakley.

Read the full Fortune story here.
 

8 best places to try Cincinnati's "remarkable chili"


The Daily Meal website returns to one of the national media's favorite regional food topics, Cincinnati chili, with a guide to eight key places in Southwest Ohio to try the crazy concoction. The writer makes a point to say he excluded Northern Kentucky spots on purpose, perhaps setting the stage for a future story.

"Even people who have never set foot in Cincinnati know that the city is crazy for chili," Matt Sulem writes. "However, locals will tell you that the only insane thing about chili is how good it is at the source. Not to mention instances when people dare to eat it the wrong way."

You'll have to find out all eight locations on your own, but Sulem offers a nice mix of the obvious (Skyline, Gold Star, Camp Washington) and small neighborhood chili parlors.

The Daily Meal, published by New York-based Spanfeller Media Group, "delivers a fresh take on dining news and trends and helps you succeed in the kitchen while highlighting the unifying aspects of food and drink and celebrating the people who create them."

See the Daily Meal Cincinnati chili slideshow here.
 

How "Carol" helped bring Hollywood to Cincinnati


"We hear a lot these days about the revival of many of once-great American cities, from the Rust Belt of Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and all the way down to Houston," John Oseid writes in the Forbes lifestyle section. "Everyone's got their own list, but most anyone's should include Cincinnati."

Oseid (author bio: "I cover the world of travel with gusto ... literally, the world") says the film industry has helped put Cincinnati on the path to revival.

"Carol director Todd Haynes is known, per The New York Times, for his meticulous period recreations, and recognized that Cincinnati was a goldmine of locations," he writes, mentioning a litany of other films that were shot in the area recently: Don Cheadle's "highly-anticipated" Miles Ahead, Marauders starring Bruce Willis and Christopher Meloni, hometown actress Royalty Hightower's breakout role in The Fits, James Franco's Goat and Mickey Rourke's boxing movie Tiger.

Forbes references a University of Cincinnati study saying this cinematic activity amounted to 8,880 local jobs created and $54 million in direct spending over the last two years alone. Oseid ends his story with this tip: "Should you wish to shoot your next movie in Hollywood on the Ohio, the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Film Commission is waiting for your call."

Read the full Forbes story here.
 

Cincinnati ranked #4 healthiest U.S. city thanks to "highly rated" doctors


The Better Doctors website ranks the best doctors across the U.S. via a data-driven algorithm that accounts for a doctor's education, experience and referral network, and occasionally the site uses its data to tell related stories.

Last week the site ranked the 50 largest U.S. cities according to four criteria: the American Fitness Index of residents' fitness and general health, the percentage of residents with health coverage, the number of physicians per 1,000 residents and (the secret sauce) the percentage of doctors in each city "that are highly rated according to Better Doctor's comprehensive, seven-variable algorithm."

Cincinnati is ranked #4, up from #10 last year "with a large increase in highly rated doctors and relatively high ranking in all other categories," according to the story. The top three ranked cities are Minneapolis, Washington D.C. and Boston.

Better Doctors says it obtained data from the American Fitness Index, U.S. Census and its own proprietary data, coming up with a score for each city that weighted AFI at 40% of the overall score, the percentage of highly rated doctors at 20%, the number of primary care physicians per 1,000 residents at 20% and the percentage of residents with health insurance at 20%.

Read the full Better Doctor ratings here.
 

Battle over Scalia's replacement already spilling into Ohio Senate race


The Washington Post features Ohio Sen. Rob Portman and his re-election campaign as a key example of how the upcoming battle to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia could impact this fall's Senate races in swing states.

Portman has come out in favor of President Obama deferring the choice of a new Supreme Court justice to the next president, who will be elected in November and take office in January 2017. Portman's Democratic opponents, former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland and Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld, disagree and intend to portray Portman as an obstructionist.

The Post quotes Strickland saying that Portman was “failing to do his job, shirking his responsibilities to our nation, jeopardizing the institutions of our democracy and engaging in exactly the kind of dysfunctional behavior that frustrates Ohioans about Congress.” Sittenfeld was quoted as saying that Portman advocated actions that would “put the Senate in violation of both historical precedent and the clear language of the Constitution itself.”

Portman responded in a statement: “With the election less than nine months away, I believe the best thing for the country is to trust the American people to weigh in on who should make a lifetime appointment that could reshape the Supreme Court for generations.”

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

Ex-Gov. Beshear takes on current Gov. Bevin over Kentucky health care


Former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, who's barely two months out of office, has launched a campaign to try to stop his successor, Gov. Matt Bevin, from dismantling the health care initiatives he enacted.

"Gov. Bevin is working to take health care away from people who needed it desperately and for so long didn't have it," the Louisville Courier Journal quotes Beshear saying at a Feb. 12 news conference in Louisville. "I'm not going to let that opportunity be taken away from them without a fight."

Beshear has formed the organization Save Kentucky Healthcare to promote the changes he enacted to implement the Affordable Care Act, adding health coverage for more than 500,000 Kentuckians.

Read the full Louisville Courier Journal story here.
 

Cincinnati Streetcar on the cover of British transit magazine


The Light Rail Transit Association, based in England, publishes Tramways & Urban Transit magazine, which its website says "is widely regarded as the definitive light rail journal and is essential reading for all concerned with urban transport and planning. ... Read how cities are transforming themselves with modern modes of urban transit — making them better places to live, work, shop and play — enabling civilised life without the dominance of the motor car."

The cover of its February issue shines some international attention on the civilised/civilized life we enjoy in Cincinnati, with the coming-soon Cincinnati Streetcar the poster child for "A Bumper Year for Tramway Openings."

See the Light Rail Transit Association website here. You'll have to become a member to read the magazine content online.
 

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

New study says Cincinnati among best U.S. cities for prosperity and inclusion over past 5 years


A new Metro Monitor report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program ranks the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas by growth, prosperity and inclusion during the recovery from the recession. Greater Cincinnati is in the top 20 for both prosperity and inclusion while sitting in the middle of the pack for overall growth.

The Atlantic's CityLab urban issues website summarizes the report's findings and provides links to all the charts, graphs and data metrics. One key takeaway is that, when analyzing the number trends from 2009 to 2014, city growth didn't necessarily equal prosperity for all of its residents.

Besides charting growth — GMP, jobs and aggregate wages — the report analyzes how that growth translates to individual prosperity, based on productivity, average annual wages and average standard of living. It also looks as whether that growth and prosperity includes all people across income and race brackets.

Read the full CityLab story and access the Brookings Metro Monitor report here.
 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Caribbean cricket star trying to break into baseball, thanks to Reds coach


An interesting feature story in The New York Times discusses how West Indies cricket star Kieran Powell is pursuing a dream to play professional baseball, working with a number of instructors that include Reds hitting coordinator Ryan Jackson.

Jackson is one of several coaches to have worked with Powell during the player’s six-month quest to sign with a baseball team, the story says, and told the Times that Powell “has made tremendous strides in a short period of time” and that the 6-foot-2, 190-pound Powell, age 25, profiled as a potential center fielder and leadoff hitter with a swing that could produce gap-to-gap line drives.

No professional cricket players have ever played major league baseball, the story says, though it references two pitchers from cricket-loving India, Dinesh Patel and Rinku Singh, who were signed to minor league deals by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2009 (their story was depicted in the movie Million Dollar Arm). Patel is no longer in organized baseball; Singh is, but he hasn't gotten anywhere near the major leagues.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Jim Obergefell among the Obamas' guests at State of the Union address


Over-the-Rhine resident Jim Obergefell will be among the official guests on Jan. 12 as President Obama delivers his final State of the Union address. He'll be joined by 20 other armed services members and civilians associated with the issues and initiatives that have defined Obama’s presidency, including Syrian refugee Refaai Hamo; Oscar Vazquez, a former illegal immigrant who went on to serve in the United States Army; and Air Force Staff Sgt. Spencer Stone, who helped take down a gunman on a train in France last August.

Obergefell had sued the state of Ohio, which had outlawed same-sex marriage, and ended up as the lead plaintiff on the Supreme Court case that last June guaranteed gay couples across the country the right to marry.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 
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