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Diversity : Cincinnati In The News

182 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All

Want a bike-friendly city? Get ready to fail until it works, says Wired


Here's a fascinating article from Wired about building a bike-friendly culture in cities. Although it doesn't specifically mention Cincinnati, its findings and recommendations definitely apply to us.

"Building any infrastructure, anywhere, is a pain in the neck," writes Aarian Marshall. "You've got to find exactly the right government agencies, community groups, funding sources and contractors. And then you've got to figure out the logistics of construction and worry about the inevitable delays and cost overruns."

But Marshall then says not to despair, that there's good news for our soon-to-be bicycling-loving cities. "Across the country, usually stodgy governments are trying quick and dirty pilot projects, putting down cheap and temporary bicycle infrastructure and giving it a literal test drive (well, ride) before committing to the big stuff."

Like bike-only lanes along Central Parkway?

"Laying down temporary infrastructure before ginning up anything permanent also provides an opportunity to convince skeptics about the upsides of bike travel," Marshall writes. "Demonstration projects go a long way in terms of alleviating fears. Once residents see bicycle infrastructure in action, he says, they (usually) decide it doesn’t take up too much room or cost too much money. That makes it politically easier to build permanent protected lanes, bike boxes and signals."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Preservation Magazine sees how Covington's Shotgun Row fosters a sense of community


Preservation Magazine's Spring issue includes a glowing feature story on how Covington is bringing back its West Side neighborhood, centered around rehabs of old shotgun homes on Orchard Street.

Soapbox profiled several "neighborhood heroes" in 2015 who helped lead that revitalization effort, particularly around reducing crime. We also covered the Shotgun Row concept as it geared up in 2014 and homes were put on the market in 2015 as work/living spaces for artists.

Preservation Magazine — published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation — interviews Sarah Allan, program director for the nonprofit Center for Great Neighborhoods, about its ongoing efforts to acquire, rehabilitate and sell derelict or seriously dilapidated historic buildings on Covington's West Side, "a working-class enclave across the Ohio River from Cincinnati."

"The Center has completed more than 30 projects in Covington in recent years, but Shotgun Row, for which it received a state historic preservation award, might be its crown jewel," the story says.

"These houses were so far gone, people questioned why we would even want to save them," Allan tells the magazine. "But with this project we were leveraging so much more than just a single building. We basically took the worst block and helped transform it. People look at Shotgun Row now and don’t even see the (individual) houses. It's like its own beautiful entity. It was definitely the most transformative project we've ever done."

Read the full Preservation Magazine story here.
 

Contemporary Arts Center was one of Zaha Hadid's most striking designs, says New York Times


The New York Times offers a tribute to architect Zaha Hadid, who died March 31 at age 65, by highlighting her seven most striking designs, including the Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts downtown.

The former Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp, one of Hadid’s great champions, famously wrote of the new CAC facility in 2003: "Might as well blurt it out: The Rosenthal Center is the most important American building to be completed since the end of the Cold War."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

KPMG study shows Cincinnati as most cost-friendly business location among large U.S. cities


Cincinnati is the most cost-friendly city to do business among the 31 largest U.S. metro areas, according to the recently released 2016 Competitive Alternatives study by audit, tax and advisory firm KPMG.

Favorable leasing costs and low property taxes contributed to Cincinnati's first place ranking in the study, which compares 26 key cost components in each market — including costs associated with taxes, labor, facilities, transportation and utilities — as they apply to seven different business-to-business service sector operations and 12 different manufacturing sector operations.

"Many factors go into site selection decisions, and a study such as ours helps businesses, city leaders and economic development teams begin to consider investments that should ultimately be good for the community and good for business," says Ulrich Schmidt, a managing director in KPMG's Global Location and Expansion Services practice, which helps companies that are expanding, relocating or consolidating their facilities.

Read the full KPMG report here.
 

Forbes rates Cincinnati as #15 best U.S. city for recent college grads


College graduates today face better job prospects than those from a few years ago but are typically saddled by student loan debt, Forbes magazine writes, so "they would be wise to consider carefully where to start their careers."

To find out which cities offer the best overall prospects for college-educated workers with five years of experience or less, Forbes has crunched data on job growth, unemployment rates, pay and cost of living in America’s largest 100 metro areas. Its resulting 2016 list of the 20 Best Cities for Young Professionals includes Cincinnati at #15.

The top cities, according to Forbes, are either job-heavy economic powerhouses where the pay is high and the cost of living is too (places like San Francisco at #1 and Silicon Valley at #2) or underrated mid-tier markets where the pay is still decent but the cost of living is a relative bargain.

According to the numbers, Cincinnati's median salary for college grads with 0-5 years experience is $50,800; the population with bachelor's degree is 31.44%; the average yearly job growth (2015-2017) is 1.96%; and the cost of living is 8.17% below the national average.

Two regional cities finished ahead of Cincinnati — Columbus at #7 and Indianapolis at #10.

Read the full Forbes list and methodology here.
 

Chefs around the country share why wood-fire cooking sparks their creativity


Just a few years ago, Kat Kinsman writes on the Tasting Table website, the dining world was poised to drown in a gurgle of futuristic gels, spheres and foams far removed from the sensory experiences most people might associate with food. That disconnect might factor into 80 percent of the 2016 semifinalists for the James Beard Best New Restaurant award featuring dishes containing the words "wood-grilled," "smoked" and "ember" on their current menus.

"Wood-fire cooking is roaring back in a big way," Kinsman says, "and chefs from coast to coast are using this ancient technique to spark some creative thinking in their kitchens."

One of the leading wood-fire experts she profiles is Jared Bennett, executive chef of Metropole in the 21c Museum Hotel downtown who "wants diners to really feel — and taste — the burn."

The article goes on to explore Bennett's menu at length, delighting in his mix of modern techniques "with ripping-hot wood-fired heat to distinctive effect."

Tasting Table describes itself as "a website and newsletter for culinary enthusiasts." Read the full story here.
 

How the smart cities like Cincinnati use Internet of Things to attract young, skilled workforce


Social media expert and management professor Beverly Macy writes in Huffington Post about the coming connectivity explosion through embrace of the Internet of Things, saying there will be 24 billion IoT devices installed globally by 2020 and $6 trillion invested in IoT solutions over the next five years.

As the "great digital transformation of 2016" proceeds in both the private and public sectors around the globe, Macy says, we'll all be affected by the digital innovation in more ways than one.

She says the nation's "smart cities" are attracting a youthful and highly skilled workforce with "livability and connectedness" as key selling points, using Cincinnati as a prime example. As part of the White House’s TechHire Initiative, Cincinnati is looking to retrain displaced workers as application developers who could be hired on in IoT startups popping up or by companies like local manufacturer Mazak Corp.

Read the full Huffington Post story here.
 

Cincinnati lags behind other Midwestern cities for immigrants establishing roots


Coastal cities such as Los Angeles, Miami and New York have long been viewed as the gateways for immigrants starting new lives in America, Governing Magazine says, but the best immigrant-friendly strategies these days are to be found in the Midwest.

“Places like Indianapolis and Columbus and Dayton, Ohio, have pursued a wide range of immigrant-friendly strategies, in part to prop up vulnerable economies and stem population losses,” Mike Maciag writes. “Other Rust Belt jurisdictions are joining them.” Cincinnati is not among the top destinations for immigrants, according to the magazine's analysis of U.S. Census data.

“The Midwest is becoming the new gateway,” Guadalupe Velasquez, who coordinates the New American Initiative for the city of Columbus, tells Governing.

Governing compared Census data collected between 2005-2009 with data from 2010-2014 for all cities with populations of at least 100,000. Maciag's story accompanying the data highlights five cities with the best immigrant initiatives: Columbus, Dayton, Detroit, Louisville and Baltimore.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.
 

Artfully rebuilding in Covington


The national website of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has a section called "Our Stories" to share examples of successful community-building efforts from its 30-plus offices across the U.S. The local story featured last week was "Rebuilding, Artfully, in Kentucky" and covered the amazing work LISC Cincinnati has done in Covington in partnership with the Center for Great Neighborhoods.

"More and more, community developers are using arts and culture, so integral to the character and identity of a flourishing place, to catalyze neighborhood renewal," national writer Alina Tugend says in her introduction. "In Covington, Ky., this kind of creative placemaking has helped brighten and invigorate communities that have struggled with blight, crime and abandonment, particularly the city’s Westside area. Today, Covington has more welcoming public spaces, affordable homes and new businesses than since its 20th-century heyday as the iron fence capital of the world."

Read the full story on the LISC national website here.
 

Cincinnati is a top 10 "secretly great" city for tech grads


New college tech graduates looking for growth and mentorship, hoping to stand out and facing their first student loan bills should consider 10 "secretly great" U.S. cities, including Cincinnati, says a blog post at the sales support website DataFox.

DataFox ranked cities based on financial stability, mentorship opportunities, name recognition of local corporations and growth opportunity. The findings included three "big takeaways":
• Close-knit communities are the foundation of strong networks.
• Affordability can't be overstated.
• Partnerships between large and small companies give the best of both worlds.

Cincinnati is noted for a tech scene that "relies on a symbiosis between big corporations and tiny startups. ... Its companies rank above the national average in management team quality, brand recognition and financial stability, three key qualities for those just coming out of college." Without naming names, the blog post also says "the city's accelerators and incubators offer ongoing support as well as funding, which isn't easy to find in highly competitive Silicon Valley."

FYI, one of those accelerators, The Brandery, just opened applications for its 2016 class.

Read the full DataFox blog post here.
 

New study says Cincinnati among best U.S. cities for prosperity and inclusion over past 5 years


A new Metro Monitor report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program ranks the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas by growth, prosperity and inclusion during the recovery from the recession. Greater Cincinnati is in the top 20 for both prosperity and inclusion while sitting in the middle of the pack for overall growth.

The Atlantic's CityLab urban issues website summarizes the report's findings and provides links to all the charts, graphs and data metrics. One key takeaway is that, when analyzing the number trends from 2009 to 2014, city growth didn't necessarily equal prosperity for all of its residents.

Besides charting growth — GMP, jobs and aggregate wages — the report analyzes how that growth translates to individual prosperity, based on productivity, average annual wages and average standard of living. It also looks as whether that growth and prosperity includes all people across income and race brackets.

Read the full CityLab story and access the Brookings Metro Monitor report here.
 

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Caribbean cricket star trying to break into baseball, thanks to Reds coach


An interesting feature story in The New York Times discusses how West Indies cricket star Kieran Powell is pursuing a dream to play professional baseball, working with a number of instructors that include Reds hitting coordinator Ryan Jackson.

Jackson is one of several coaches to have worked with Powell during the player’s six-month quest to sign with a baseball team, the story says, and told the Times that Powell “has made tremendous strides in a short period of time” and that the 6-foot-2, 190-pound Powell, age 25, profiled as a potential center fielder and leadoff hitter with a swing that could produce gap-to-gap line drives.

No professional cricket players have ever played major league baseball, the story says, though it references two pitchers from cricket-loving India, Dinesh Patel and Rinku Singh, who were signed to minor league deals by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2009 (their story was depicted in the movie Million Dollar Arm). Patel is no longer in organized baseball; Singh is, but he hasn't gotten anywhere near the major leagues.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Jim Obergefell among the Obamas' guests at State of the Union address


Over-the-Rhine resident Jim Obergefell will be among the official guests on Jan. 12 as President Obama delivers his final State of the Union address. He'll be joined by 20 other armed services members and civilians associated with the issues and initiatives that have defined Obama’s presidency, including Syrian refugee Refaai Hamo; Oscar Vazquez, a former illegal immigrant who went on to serve in the United States Army; and Air Force Staff Sgt. Spencer Stone, who helped take down a gunman on a train in France last August.

Obergefell had sued the state of Ohio, which had outlawed same-sex marriage, and ended up as the lead plaintiff on the Supreme Court case that last June guaranteed gay couples across the country the right to marry.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 
182 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All
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