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Diversity : Cincinnati In The News

128 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All

Renovated food markets in New Orleans offer lessons for Cincinnati


New Orleans once had 34 neighborhood food markets, with historic roots to a time before modern refrigeration when neighborhood shopping was central to daily life. Many closed post-WWII, as population moved to the suburbs, and most of the remaining markets were shuttered by Hurricane Katrina.

Next City has a feature story on the rebirth of three neighborhood markets in New Orleans, two as traditional neighborhood markets and one as a museum.

"In all of our post-Katrina work, what we find is that people want what they had, except they didn’t understand that what they had was very difficult to have to begin with," says Cedric Grant, executive director of the New Orleans Building Corporation, which is spearheading the renovations. "And now you have to really imagine something new."

These efforts remind us of the tremendous asset Cincinnati has in Findlay Market, a neighborhood market that has withstood the decline of its Over-the-Rhine surroundings and seems poised to benefit from redevelopment there, including the new streetcar line.

Description of the efforts to revive neighborhood food markets in New Orleans — including interaction with residents and struggles to develop the right business model — might offer lessons for movements to bring co-op markets to local neighborhoods like Clifton and Northside.

Read the full article here.
 

Constella Festival is "challenging the misconceptions of classical music"


Cincinnati's annual Constella Festival of Music & Fine Arts is called "the festival that's challenging the misconceptions of classical music" in a preview article published in Huffington Post's Arts & Culture section.

In December Soapbox wrote about founder Tatiana Berman's efforts to expand Constella's reach by employing more digital promotions that "target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati." This Huffington Post piece will certainly help with her goal.

"Unlike the standard classical music circuit — characterized by what Berman's team describes as the 100 concert a year demanding schedule — Constella seeks to, in essence, maintain the intimacy of classical music, but encourage the experimentation and chance-taking," the article says.

The Constella Festival runs April 8-19 at Memorial Hall, Woodward Theatre, Cincinnati Art Museum, SCPA and several other venues. Get festival details and buy tickets here.

Read the full Huffington Post article here.
 

Choremonster, Lisnr make list of Upstart 100 driving the "new economy"


The CEOs of two Cincinnati startups — Chris Bergman of Choremoster and Rodney Williams of Lisnr — are featured in Upstart 100, a list of "the inventors, visionaries, masters and more driving the new economy" as proclaimed by Upstart Business Journal, a national online publication owned by Cincinnati Business Courier's parent company.

Other figures named to the list include Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Steve Case, Jay Z and Taylor Swift, so the local entrepreneurs are in excellent company.

Read the full list and accompanying editor's note here.

 

Mapping Cincinnati's Future: Population to increase 11% by 2030


A new database report from the Urban Institute maps the impact of births, deaths and migration on population trends for every county in the U.S. in 2020 and 2030, showing which areas should expect to grow and which should expect population loss. Titled "Mapping America's Futures," the report projects the racial and age breakdown of U.S. counties and metro areas in 2030 based on current demographic trends.

"We can already see that the population is aging and becoming more diverse, but how will those trends play out at the local and regional levels?" the accompanying article asks. "And what if, in the future, we live longer or have more babies? How would those trends affect the population in different cities and states?"

Urban Institute's model projects that Greater Cincinnati's population will grow 11.22 percent between 2010 and 2030, from 2,068,893 to 2,301,090. Our population will get slightly more diverse, as those categorized as Hispanic and Other (compared to White and Black) are projected to become 12 percent of the local population in 2030 vs. the 2010 level of 5.3 percent. As with the country as a whole, Cincinnati is projected to become older — although the largest age group will continue to be those 20-49.

See the full report, including an interactive map of the entire U.S., here.
 

Cincinnati is deeply rooted

Census Bureau data reveals that Cincinnati is slightly more "rooted" than the average large U.S. city. Governing magazine analyzes several measures — length of housing tenure, whether people lived in the state where they were born, recent migration data — to determine which cities' residents have particularly deep local roots and wonders how those roots determine a city's civic character. Read more.

Price Hill: A Cincinnati neighborhood climbs back

There is a palpable sense of investment in Price Hill. People cut their lawns and paint the trim. A locally-owned coffee house opened. Across from the coffee shop, real estate investor Bill Burwinkel transformed a derelict, century-old building into an art gallery and high-end apartments. Tom Croft, who restored his aging Italianate home to perfection, meets weekly with his neighbors to brainstorm about local problems. Young families and urban professionals are moving in, along with a Guatemalan and North African immigrant population that gives Price Hill a rich diversity, in evidence from the Kroger’s ethnic food aisle to the community garden. Read more.

Cincinnati offers lessons learned to Ferguson, Mo.

The trigger for civil unrest in Ferguson, Mo.—the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man by a police officer—has also provoked riots in American cities both small and large in the last two decades, including Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine. Find out what advice Cincinnati's leaders had for Ferguson. Read more.

Cincinnati newspaper exec says Black Press 'as relevant as ever'

Walter L. White is senior vice president for Sesh Communications for the Cincinnati Herald—the longest operating African American newspaper in Cincinnati, with a circulation of nearly 20,000. Read more.

My visit to the United States

Fasiha Sharif is a journalist from Pakistan visiting and working in the WVXU newsroom on a three week assignment. She’ll be sharing her thoughts and experiences on the WVXU website and doing some on air reporting. Read her first installment.

Hip Green Scene releases Cincinnati city guide

Hip Green Scene just released its latest city guide: Cincinnati. The Queen City joins the list of other midwestern and southern cities, including Louisville, Asheville and Charleston. Check out the guide.

UC makes big gains on international student survey rankings

High scores for arrival activities and other improvements help UC jump into the top 40 worldwide in a new survey of international students. Read more.

Don Cheadle to film Miles Davis biopic in Cincy, NKY

Ten days after Cate Blanchett finished "Carol," the Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Film Commission announced that Don Cheadle will star as iconic jazz innovator Miles Davis in a movie filming here this summer. Read more.

Gays in Cincinnati: From second-class citizens to fully accepted

Gay rights issues led Ryan Messer to move away from Cincinnati. It also led to Mike Moroski losing his job. Today, both men agree that gays are more accepted in the city than they've ever been. Read more.

Mentors help minority companies accelerate growth

Minority business accelerators have launched in a handful of metropolitan areas in recent years as local businesses, chambers of commerce and economic development groups work to create more jobs and improve the quality of life in their regions. The Cincinnati accelerator, created by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber in 2003, has inspired officials and business people in the Greenville, S.C.; Charlotte, N.C., and Newark, N.J. areas to start similar programs. Read more.

Children's Hospital one of the top 10 health systems in the nation for workplace diversity

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center has been recognized as one of the top 10 health systems in the nation for workplace diversity. Find out why.
128 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All
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