| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Arts + Culture : Cincinnati In The News

315 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All

Brewery Heritage Trail named one of the best things coming in 2017


Thrillist rounded up the 15 coolest projects coming to U.S. cities in 2017, including the Brewing Heritage Trail in Over-the-Rhine, which recently received $300,000 in state and local funds. The trail will highlight the neighborhood's long and storied brewing history by taking people into the bellies of old breweries.

To take a tour, you will download an app that will take you on a 2.3-mile trek through OTR, Pendleton and downtown. Beer barons and brewery workers will narrate the tour and provide historical anecdotes along the way.

To see the other 14 projects, click here.
 
 

Cincinnati and Covington both make Travel + Leisure's list of best places to travel


Travel + Leisure recently named its top 50 travel destinations in the world, and Cincinnati and Covington both made the list because of the investment made by developers and the community to reinvigorate the region.

Cincinnati's must-see destinations include Over-the-Rhine and Union Terminal, and reasons to visit in the near future include Music Hall and Ziegler Park, both after renovations are completed, of course.

Locations in Covington include the newly opened Hotel Covington, which is in a former department store.

See the full list of destinations here.
 

Cincinnati Library wins national innovator award

The Urban Libraries Council named the the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County one of the top innovators of 2016 for a new collections program. 

Readers select their favorite authors on the library website and every time an item becomes available by an author a hold is automatically placed in the reader's preferred format so readers never miss a release by a favorite author. So far 1752 people have subscribed to Hot Tickets and 12,780 to Hot Authors.

The Urban Libraries Council Innovations Initiative recognizes library members' innovations in 10 categories that demonstrate the value and impact of public library service in the 21st century. Cincinnati won the category of innovations in the curation and/or creation of print and digital content; approaches for measuring use of collections.

The 2016 Urban Libraries Council Innovations Initiative showcases programs that provide lifelong learning opportunities, meet the unique needs of diverse audiences, leverage technology to connect people with each other and vital resources, and address community issues. The website houses more than 1,200 leading practices that reflect library missions, strategies, achievements, and community contributions. Read more at the Urban Libraries Council.

Renaissance Covington named Great American Main Street Award semi-finalist


Last year, Renaissance Covington was named as "One to Watch" by Main Street America, and now it's a semi-finalist for a Great American Main Street Award.

Since its inception in 2003, Renaissance Covington has created 790 new jobs, and about 150 new businesses have opened in the downtown Covington. While maintaining a strong commitment to the Main Street Approach, the organization has implemented creative and fun solutions to downtown revitalization challenges, including pop-up shops, a temporary “parklet” initiative and annual arts festival.

See the other semi-finalists for the Great American Main Street Awards here.

The Overlook Lodge named one of the best bars in the country


The Overlook Lodge was recently name one of the 50 best bars in the country by Playboy. Voting is now closed, but the Top 10 winners will be announced in the magazine's November issue. 

The bar is themed after the hotel in Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, with axes and stag antlers adorning the walls. And the cocktail menu features drinks like Writer's Block, which is bourbon and apple-berry sweet tea, and the Summer Caretaker —  rum, lemon, habanero, peach bitters and prickly pear soda. There's even a snack menu, featuring different homemade trail mixes.

Read the full story here.

Walk through Findlay Market reveals 40 vendors & restaurants


Findlay Market is getting lots of attention this summer as new developments crop up around it and the streetcar opening looms near. USA Today recently named it one of the top U.S. food markets.

USA Today now has compiled a virtual "tour" of Findlay Market, complete with photos of vendors, merchants and restaurants. If you can't make it to the market, this tour is for you.

Take the full virtual tour here.
 

Cincinnati named one of top cities for beer


Real estate blog Redfin and the Beer Institute recently named Cincinnati as one of the top 15 beer cities in the country. It was ranked #14 on the list, just above San Francisco. Pittsburgh was ranked #1, followed by Buffalo, N.Y.; Milwaukee; Grand Rapids, Mich.; and Philadelphia.

Cities were ranked based on five criteria: the number of breweries in the state per every 100,000 adults age 21-plus; the number of active breweries in each state; state beer taxes; the median home sale price; and the city's Walk Score — also known as "Don't drink and drive."

Read the full story here.

Findlay Market named among nation's top historic food markets


Findlay Market was recently named one of the top food markets in the country by USA Today. Opened in 1855, Findlay Market is the oldest continuously operating market in the United States.

The market has a plethora of indoor vendors as well as farmers market stands set up outside on the weekends. Model Group is currently developing retail space and apartments around the market, with new businesses expected to open in these spaces.

You can find out more about Findlay Market, and others like it, here.
 

Artichoke OTR rated one of the 10 great U.S. cookware shops


The Food Network website is featuring Artichoke among the 10 great cookware shops in the U.S. in a listicle titled "Where Cooks Shop." The Over-the-Rhine store opened a few months ago just north of Findlay Market on Elm Street.

Andrea Strong highlights "finds for your kitchen at these cook-approved spots around the country," which include independently-owned shops in Brooklyn, Chicago and Philadelphia in addition to Artichoke.

Read the full Food Network list here.
 

How Cincinnati salvaged the nation's most dangerous neighborhood


Politico Magazine presents an exhaustive, well-researched overview of how the City of Cincinnati and 3CDC "salvaged" Over-the-Rhine, tracing the neighborhood's political battles since the 1930s and putting today's renaissance into historical context.

"It's a transformation that's happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the 'most dangerous' title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village," writes Politico Contributing Editor Colin Woodward. "And it didn't happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred in Over-the-Rhine — from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses — has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity."
 
That would be 3CDC, and Woodward retraces how then-Mayor Charlie Luken and then-Procter & Gamble CEO A.G. Lafley cooked up the idea for such an organization in the wake of the 2001 civil unrest. He also does a good job explaining how 3CDC went about accumulating OTR buildings, how it's developing Vine Street block by block and why so many neighborhood residents feel left out of the comeback.

It's a well-written story with excellent photography and meticulous detail on German immigrants, the "OTR naming" story, population shifts, Buddy Gray, Jim Tarbell, The Brandery, the Brewery District and much more.

Read the full Politico story here.
 

Food tours are a delicious way to explore Cincinnati


A new Travel Diary post on the family travel website Taking the Kids explores Over-the-Rhine via a day with Cincinnati Food Tours.

"I recently visited Cincinnati and instantly liked its welcoming vibe," Allison Tibaldi writes. "It is proud of its traditions, but not bound by them. Locals are passionately supportive of their beloved Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, but a thriving contemporary art scene is equally embraced. Nowhere is this yin and yang of tradition and innovation more apparent than in the culinary arena. While this city gets its share of recognition for down-home Cincinnati-style chili, cutting-edge chefs are flocking here like bees to honey."

Tibaldi visited Findlay Market, "a vibrant living landmark and essential community institution," and then joined Cincinnati Food Tours to check out Salazar's, Taft's Ale House and Holtman's Donuts.

Read the full Taking the Kids post here.
 

Avondale program shows how the arts contribute to creating more equitable places


Local arts leader Margy Waller has published a report about her painting project in Avondale on Americans for the Arts' ArtsBlog. It's her fifth blog post in 2016 related to her involvement with the organization's New Community Visions Initiative, a two-year effort to explore the role of community-based arts enabling organizations, funders, cultural institutions and artists in shaping the future of local arts in the U.S.

Waller's new blog post asks how the arts can contribute to creating more equitable places and offers her Avondale experience as an example of success.

"Leaders at two of the area hospitals seem to recognize the damage done to the neighborhood (by large institutions replacing homes with office buildings and parking lots) and are looking for ways to connect with residents, bridging and bonding with the community, creating a stronger place for all," she writes. "These leaders called for a partner to create an experience, having in mind something like the ArtWalks — community inspired and co-created crosswalk murals — we’ve created in other neighborhoods."

The resulting painting project at Gabriel's Place, Waller says, "might seem a small thing. But, no. Co-creating the art is a major happiness element, enhancing quality of life and connecting the neighborhood residents to people working at the encroaching institutions. Recognizing the damage done, the racist and privileged actions over decades, is large."

Read Margy Waller's full blog post here.
 

Playhouse featured in New York Times story about marketing provocative shows


The New York Times is taking the temperature of regional theaters across the U.S. to see how they're marketing Sex With Strangers, a popular play about a relationship between a female novelist and a younger male blogger.

“Since it had its premiere in 2011 at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago, Sex With Strangers has become one of the most produced plays in the country,” Erik Piepenburg writes, “helped by strong reviews ... a small cast and a provocative title.”

Piepenburg explains that theaters have taken usually one of two routes to promote it: with either a G-rated illustration or an R-leaning photograph, usually of the two actors. He surveys six regional theaters, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, to see which direction their marketing took and what response they got. The Playhouse opened its current Shelterhouse season with the show Sept. 26-Oct. 25.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Covington the most underrated place in Kentucky, says Thrillist ranking


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published another one of its "best/worst things in all 50 states list," this time identifying the most underrated place in each state. The city of Covington gets the honor for Kentucky: "This one-time downtrodden river town has become a hipster enclave," Thrillist declares.

The list's introduction says Thrillist asked the experts to help compile its list, "from our knowledgeable local writers and editors, to the state tourism boards and visitors bureaus, to our high school friends who never moved away."

Covington is noted for its "stunning views of America’s 10th-best skyline (Cincinnati!);" for "two of America’s best bourbon bars," Wiseguy and the Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar; for numerous historic districts; for the Cathedral Basilica, "a one-third replica of the cathedral at Notre Dame;" and for the Roebling Suspension Bridge, "the inspiration for that, you know, lesser-known bridge in Brooklyn."

Ohio's most underrated place is Cedar Point, and Indiana's is the Indianapolis Zoo.

Read the full Thrillist list here.
 

Preservation Magazine sees how Covington's Shotgun Row fosters a sense of community


Preservation Magazine's Spring issue includes a glowing feature story on how Covington is bringing back its West Side neighborhood, centered around rehabs of old shotgun homes on Orchard Street.

Soapbox profiled several "neighborhood heroes" in 2015 who helped lead that revitalization effort, particularly around reducing crime. We also covered the Shotgun Row concept as it geared up in 2014 and homes were put on the market in 2015 as work/living spaces for artists.

Preservation Magazine — published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation — interviews Sarah Allan, program director for the nonprofit Center for Great Neighborhoods, about its ongoing efforts to acquire, rehabilitate and sell derelict or seriously dilapidated historic buildings on Covington's West Side, "a working-class enclave across the Ohio River from Cincinnati."

"The Center has completed more than 30 projects in Covington in recent years, but Shotgun Row, for which it received a state historic preservation award, might be its crown jewel," the story says.

"These houses were so far gone, people questioned why we would even want to save them," Allan tells the magazine. "But with this project we were leveraging so much more than just a single building. We basically took the worst block and helped transform it. People look at Shotgun Row now and don’t even see the (individual) houses. It's like its own beautiful entity. It was definitely the most transformative project we've ever done."

Read the full Preservation Magazine story here.
 
315 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts