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Cincinnati In The News

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Jeff Ruby's named best steakhouse in Ohio


Business Insider magazine has collaborated with Foursquare to identify the top steakhouses in every state based on what Foursquare-savvy diners think. The restaurants were chosen using an algorithm that considers likes, saves, shares and tip sentiment, among other Foursquare user information.

Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse downtown was chosen as the best in Ohio.
 
"The elegant decor at Jeff Ruby's recalls a French Art Deco steakhouse, circa 1940s Manhattan," the magazine writes, adding that it's "popular among celebrities, athletes and politicians."

Read the full list of top steakhouses in all 50 states here.
 

City birds really are meaner


Gizmodo offers a little insight into modern urban life by citing a recent study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology, in which a group of researchers describe the differences in song sparrow behavior they observed in rural and urban areas.

"Out in the country, birds are always singing happily," the Gizmodo post begins. "But in the city, they squawk and fly into your face. Now scientists say there's actually a reason why city birds can be such aggressive jerks — and no, it's not the same reason why urban humans can be so terrible."

Read the Gizmodo post and find a link to the study here.
 

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy


Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.
 

How Cincinnati nailed the All Star Game


After a solid year of planning and publicity, the 2015 All Star Game has come and gone. What were the main impressions Cincinnati left on the MLB players and officials, the visitors and the media? Will there be any long-term benefits? And what did we residents ultimately get out of the experience?

It'll take months if not years to sort out the benefits, but two things are clear the day after the game: Cincinnati did a masterful job of planning and hosting the All Star Game, and we really lucked out with the weather. Every major outdoor event went off as planned, and even a last-minute replacement headliner for the free concert at Paul Brown Stadium turned lemons into lemonade.

Local organizers were surely dying a thousand deaths during Monday's and Tuesday's storms, but the Cincinnati presented during national TV segments was sunny, balmy and happy.

Here's a roundup of day-after media coverage:

8 ways Cincinnati rocked the All Star Game (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Fans, visitors impressed with Cincinnati's show (WVXU-FM)

All Star players impressed with Cincinnati and events (Local 12)

Cincinnati's All Star festivities a home run for visitors, locals (Business Courier)

9 lessons Cincinnati learned from the All Star Game (WCPO.com)

Alisha Perkins: I was fully prepared to not like Cincinnati, but I kind of fell in love with this place (Huffington Post)

Pete Rose drama plays out on baseball's biggest stage (New York Times)
 

MLB.com highlights Cincinnati's attractions for All Star Game visitors


Now come the national media stories highlighting Cincinnati's restaurants, bars, arts & culture, museums and general urban renaissance to provide All Star Game visitors with a well-rounded picture of what to expect during their time here. Leading off is Major League Baseball itself, going for a home run overview of Cincinnati attractions along with Skyline, Graeter's and Montgomery Inn ribs.

"Seemingly in a renaissance for progress and development, it feels like the perfect summer for Cincinnati to be hosting the All-Star Game presented by T-Mobile," the MLB.com article opens. "A lot has changed since 1988, when the city last hosted the Midsummer Classic. Cincinnati was known then (and now) for being a baseball town with its own unique style of chili. Today, it has a chance to be recognized for much more."

Read the full MLB.com article here.
 

UC's Santa Ono lauded as "true gentleman and scholar" for giving bonus to charity


The Huffington Post gives some national attention to University of Cincinnati President Santa Ono's recent decision to turn down his $200,000 bonus and donate the money to 13 charities as well as to the family of slain Cincinnati Police Office Sonny Kim.

In its Community Kindness section, writer Cameron Keady relays the WCPO story about Ono's actions. He also mentions Ono's recognition by Inside Higher Ed as the nation's "most notable college president" for 2015, saying "he has certainly fulfilled that distinguished title with this selfless act."

Read the full Huffington Post article here.
 

Curtis Sittenfeld on the institution of marriage in New York Times


You can find in-depth coverage of yesterday's historic Supreme Court ruling in favor of marriage rights for all Americans at Cincinnati.com, CNN and The New York Times. CityBeat reflects on a "a year of queer" before today's Cincinnati Pride events.

Writer Curtis Sittenfeld, a Cincinnati native and P.G.'s sister, has published an opinion piece in The New York Times reacting to the marriage ruling. It's a personal reflection on the institution of marriage titled "Welcome, Everyone, to the Right to Marry."

"For an institution that has, especially in recent weeks and years, been subject to such extensive and vigorous public debate, marriage is strangely unknowable — that is, any particular marriage is mysterious to anyone outside it," she begins. "Think of a couple in your life or the public eye, gay or straight: When they’re alone together, do you imagine they’re nicer, meaner or exactly the same with each other as when they’re around others? Who attends to which household obligations? If they have young kids, how do they handle child care? How frequently do they fight or have sex? Are they, as individuals, fundamentally glad or regretful that they’re together?"

Sittenfeld concludes: "Now that same-sex marriage is legal nationwide, plenty of gay people won’t get married just because they can, just as plenty of straight people don't. Even so, how wonderful that the option exists for all of us."

Read Curtis Sittenfeld's full New York Times article here.
 

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.
 

Midwestern cities connect manufacturing past with tomorrow's next big tech invention


Next City looks at how Midwestern cities are trying to revive manufacturing in the startup economy under the catchy title "Cleveland Wants to Make Sure the Next Wright Brothers Come From the Rust Belt." Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

The article is written by Lee Chilcote, managing editor of Fresh Water, Soapbox's sister publication in Cleveland, and focuses on emerging "hardware" startup scenes in Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown. Although Cincinnati isn't mentioned, the manufacturing startup ecosystem here — embodied at First Batch and Hamilton Mill, among other local business backers — certainly fits the changing dynamic the article describes.

"Hardware startups ... are more viable than ever thanks to evolving prototyping technology and, in many places, a renewed emphasis on advanced manufacturing," Chilcote writes. "While software's promised land has long been Silicon Valley, the Rust Belt is fast becoming a land of milk and honey — and plasma — for hardware. In cities such as Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown, Ohio, there is already an infrastructure for affordable manufacturing in place. Plenty of institutional partners like NASA in Cleveland are eager to support new entrepreneurs."

Read the full Next City article here.
 

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup


The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.
 

Have developers figured out the "secret sauce" for gentrifying neighborhoods?


Have urban real estate investors come up with a winning formula to push redevelopment in "transitional" neighborhoods? According to Quartz, the digital news site covering the new global economy, it could be something as simple and intuitive as opening a coffee shop.

"Often, at least in America, we think of regular people as the agents of change — the artist, the boutique coffee shop owner, the tech startup," Sonali Kohli writes. "But as much as gentrification is an organic process, fueled by opportunity seekers and bargain hunters, it’s developers and financiers who have become the savvy midwives of change. Once they detect the early signs of gentrification, they bring on the serious money. ...

"The idea of driving development in an area by attracting trendsetters is not a new one; in fact urban planners took to calling it The Soho Effect in recognition of the revitalization of that New York City neighborhood after artists began moving into empty lofts in the 1970s."

Read the full story here.
 

Beer and baseball traditions make Cincinnati a "fun Midwest destination"


The New York Daily News has a new travel piece focusing on Cincinnati's beer brewing and baseball traditions, mixed with first-person impressions of riverfront development on both sides of the Ohio, downtown hotel and restaurant options and the renaissance in Over-the-Rhine.

"To a degree Cincinnati can't help but channel its past," J.P. Hoornstra writes. "The centralized downtown neighborhood known as Over-the-Rhine claims to be the largest urban historic district in the country, densely packed with 19th-century brick buildings built in the Italianate style. The neighborhood shows its age but is also increasingly livable, walkable and shop-able.

"Shopping in historic buildings is fun, but not always the substance of a vacation. What sets Cincinnati apart is how it's rallied around its baseball, beer and old buildings, creating a unique urban Midwest destination."

Read the full New York Daily News story here.
 

Fodor's ranks Cincinnati Zoo in top 10 U.S. zoos


Fodor's, one of the best-known names in travel guides, has published its list of the 10 best U.S. zoos and included Cincinnati Zoo.

"These ten zoos deliver local wildlife experiences where endangered species are nurtured, ferocious predators are kept within feet of the public, and a renaissance of education in conservation and science is incorporated throughout, promising fun for the whole family," the list's introduction says.

Cincinnati Zoo is praised for its animal demonstrations and talks; choice opportunities to feed giraffes and watch elephants bathe and cheetahs run; and for being the nation's second oldest zoo.

"(Cincinnati) zoo has a long history of animal conservation and animal awareness initiatives, including Project Saving Species, a fund that channels money throughout the world to projects dedicated to animal welfare," the story says.

Check out the full list here.
 

3CDC, CDF awarded $87 million in federal tax credits


Cincinnati's two premier nonprofit economic development organizations, 3CDC and Cincinnati Development Fund (CDF), have received federal New Market Tax Credits totaling more than $87 million, the Business Courier reported June 15. The announcement comes a year after neither received them, a big disappointment that temporarily slowed their respective investment plans.

3CDC, through its Cincinnati New Markets Fund, was awarded $45 million and CDF $42.35 million.

"The tax credits help plug gaps in financing for difficult projects located in areas from which private developers shy away," the Business Courier article says.

Upcoming 3CDC projects that might utilize the tax credits include housing and retail on Race Street and additional food/drink options in Over-the-Rhine as well as Memorial Hall, Music Hall and Ziegler Park renovations. Cincinnati Development Fund likely will invest in additional homeownership projects and could free up additional funds for its new facilities and equipment loan program for nonprofits.

Read the full Business Courier story here.
 

Ohio does in fact make or break U.S. presidents


Political junkees have long called Ohio the ultimate swing state, the king-maker in U.S. presidential races. WVXU's Howard Wilkinson has found the numbers to prove that, in fact, Ohio is the decider.

"At last we can prove what we knew intuitively all along – that there is no better state to look at than Ohio as the predictor of who the next president will be," Wilkinson writes. "And it is the state where the vote in presidential elections most closely mirrors the nation's vote as a whole."

He shares data from Kyle Kondik, managing editor of a weekly politics newsletter published by the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, looking at presidential elections dating back to 1896 and finding that no state had a higher percentage of picking the winner than Ohio. The candidate who won Ohio won the presidency 28 of 30 times, for 93 percent.

Ohio was followed closely by New Mexico, which picked 24 of the last 26 for 92 percent. (New Mexico didn't become a state until 1912.)

Read the full WVXU story here.
 
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