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Over-the-Rhine : Cincinnati In The News

247 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All

"Choice amenities" like Washington Park are changing urban landscape across U.S.


Michael Gaughan, a director with the National Development Council, writes a column on the Governing Magazine web site today discussing how new ideas and players are coalescing to provide attractive options for the livability of cities, saying that's good news for economic development. He includes Washington Park on a short list of examples of urban projects centering on new forms of recreation and mobility that often have a blurry distinction.

"More recently, a new movement has taken hold that is creating an equally powerful set of amenities for today's city-dwellers," Gaughan writes. "A hallmark of this transformation has been an interdisciplinary approach in which transportation departments and public/private developers are as important to recreation as parks departments have long been. For economic-development professionals, this evolution requires further expansion in the definition of what constitutes an urban amenity as well as who should be recruited for growth partnerships."

Read the full Governing Magazine column here.
 

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy


Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.
 

MLB.com highlights Cincinnati's attractions for All Star Game visitors


Now come the national media stories highlighting Cincinnati's restaurants, bars, arts & culture, museums and general urban renaissance to provide All Star Game visitors with a well-rounded picture of what to expect during their time here. Leading off is Major League Baseball itself, going for a home run overview of Cincinnati attractions along with Skyline, Graeter's and Montgomery Inn ribs.

"Seemingly in a renaissance for progress and development, it feels like the perfect summer for Cincinnati to be hosting the All-Star Game presented by T-Mobile," the MLB.com article opens. "A lot has changed since 1988, when the city last hosted the Midsummer Classic. Cincinnati was known then (and now) for being a baseball town with its own unique style of chili. Today, it has a chance to be recognized for much more."

Read the full MLB.com article here.
 

Beer and baseball traditions make Cincinnati a "fun Midwest destination"


The New York Daily News has a new travel piece focusing on Cincinnati's beer brewing and baseball traditions, mixed with first-person impressions of riverfront development on both sides of the Ohio, downtown hotel and restaurant options and the renaissance in Over-the-Rhine.

"To a degree Cincinnati can't help but channel its past," J.P. Hoornstra writes. "The centralized downtown neighborhood known as Over-the-Rhine claims to be the largest urban historic district in the country, densely packed with 19th-century brick buildings built in the Italianate style. The neighborhood shows its age but is also increasingly livable, walkable and shop-able.

"Shopping in historic buildings is fun, but not always the substance of a vacation. What sets Cincinnati apart is how it's rallied around its baseball, beer and old buildings, creating a unique urban Midwest destination."

Read the full New York Daily News story here.
 

3CDC, CDF awarded $87 million in federal tax credits


Cincinnati's two premier nonprofit economic development organizations, 3CDC and Cincinnati Development Fund (CDF), have received federal New Market Tax Credits totaling more than $87 million, the Business Courier reported June 15. The announcement comes a year after neither received them, a big disappointment that temporarily slowed their respective investment plans.

3CDC, through its Cincinnati New Markets Fund, was awarded $45 million and CDF $42.35 million.

"The tax credits help plug gaps in financing for difficult projects located in areas from which private developers shy away," the Business Courier article says.

Upcoming 3CDC projects that might utilize the tax credits include housing and retail on Race Street and additional food/drink options in Over-the-Rhine as well as Memorial Hall, Music Hall and Ziegler Park renovations. Cincinnati Development Fund likely will invest in additional homeownership projects and could free up additional funds for its new facilities and equipment loan program for nonprofits.

Read the full Business Courier story here.
 

WVXU's Cincinnati Edition discusses church buildings coming back to life


WVXU's "Cincinnati Edition" show did a segment June 2 about abandoned local church buildings coming back to life, the subject of a recent Soapbox feature story by Rick Pender. Host Mark Heyne interviewed Pender, Cincinnati Preservation Association Executive Director Paul Muller and Kevin Moreland, head brewer and partner at Taft's Ale House, a focal point of Pender's story.

Listen to the full "Cincinnati Edition" segment here.
 

Cincinnati Symphony's stability, growth in stark contrast to many other U.S. orchestras


The New York Times took notice of last week's announcements from Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra about its successful fundraising campaign and a new musician contract that will allow it to hire 14 more full-time players over the next four years. Classical music writer Michael Cooper says that the CSO's expansion of the ensemble to 90 members is in stark contrast to many other orchestras around the country, from Philadelphia to Atlanta, that are shedding positions to save money.

"The orchestra world is all too familiar with vicious cycles of mounting deficits, dwindling audiences, difficulty raising money and cuts," Cooper writes. "But at the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, things are moving happily in the opposite direction: think crescendo, not diminuendo."

Read the full story here.
 

First Batch highlighted as one of the country's hottest design incubators


Dwell magazine has published a guide to “a few of the country's hottest design incubators,” including Cincinnati's manufacturing-focused First Batch, that it says are helping independent designers learn the basics of how to scale up and boost the local economy.
 
“While starting a company seems the scariest, figuring out how to grow and stay sustainable offers the most challenging decisions,” Matt Anthony, program manager of First Batch, says in the article. The Over-the-Rhine-based company is described as “one of the many local organizations across the United States helping designers and manufacturers build the networks, relationships and infrastructure they need to thrive.”

The article also highlights design incubators in Detroit, San Francisco and Oakland.

Read the full article here.
 

Renovated food markets in New Orleans offer lessons for Cincinnati


New Orleans once had 34 neighborhood food markets, with historic roots to a time before modern refrigeration when neighborhood shopping was central to daily life. Many closed post-WWII, as population moved to the suburbs, and most of the remaining markets were shuttered by Hurricane Katrina.

Next City has a feature story on the rebirth of three neighborhood markets in New Orleans, two as traditional neighborhood markets and one as a museum.

"In all of our post-Katrina work, what we find is that people want what they had, except they didn’t understand that what they had was very difficult to have to begin with," says Cedric Grant, executive director of the New Orleans Building Corporation, which is spearheading the renovations. "And now you have to really imagine something new."

These efforts remind us of the tremendous asset Cincinnati has in Findlay Market, a neighborhood market that has withstood the decline of its Over-the-Rhine surroundings and seems poised to benefit from redevelopment there, including the new streetcar line.

Description of the efforts to revive neighborhood food markets in New Orleans — including interaction with residents and struggles to develop the right business model — might offer lessons for movements to bring co-op markets to local neighborhoods like Clifton and Northside.

Read the full article here.
 

Potential Seattle streetcar changes could impact national movement


Seattle followed Portland to build the second modern streetcar system in the U.S., featuring one downtown line, a second that's about to open and a third in the planning stages. Overall ridership grew steadily after the first line opened in 2008, the transit website Transport Politic says, but usage flattened out in 2013 and actually declined in 2014.

"The problem may have something to do with the way the streetcar runs: In the street, sharing lanes with cars," says Transport Politic Editor Yonah Freemark in a new blog post. "The results have been slow vehicles — the line's scheduled service averages less than eight miles per hour — often held back by traffic and a lack of reliability. This can produce horror stories of streetcars getting stuck for half an hour or more behind other vehicles and, combined with infrequent service, it certainly reinforces the sense that streetcars are too slow and unreliable to provide any serious transportation benefit.

"This is a problem shared by every existing and planned modern streetcar line in the country, suggesting that the streetcar designed to run in the street with cars may, over the long term, simply fail to attract riders who grow increasingly frustrated with the quality of service provided."

Sobering thoughts for those anticipating long-term success for the Cincinnati Streetcar, which will run in street traffic along its entire route.

Seattle is now studying the idea of dedicated lanes for its third streetcar line, with the idea of providing quicker travel times. Freeman thinks that new approach could "demonstrat(e) that one of the fundamental problems with today's modern streetcar movement can, in fact, be addressed, albeit a few years late. If it shows that those dedicated lanes can reduce disruptions and speed up service, it hopefully won't be long until we see them in cities across the country, from Atlanta to Portland."

Read the full article here.
 

Constella Festival is "challenging the misconceptions of classical music"


Cincinnati's annual Constella Festival of Music & Fine Arts is called "the festival that's challenging the misconceptions of classical music" in a preview article published in Huffington Post's Arts & Culture section.

In December Soapbox wrote about founder Tatiana Berman's efforts to expand Constella's reach by employing more digital promotions that "target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati." This Huffington Post piece will certainly help with her goal.

"Unlike the standard classical music circuit — characterized by what Berman's team describes as the 100 concert a year demanding schedule — Constella seeks to, in essence, maintain the intimacy of classical music, but encourage the experimentation and chance-taking," the article says.

The Constella Festival runs April 8-19 at Memorial Hall, Woodward Theatre, Cincinnati Art Museum, SCPA and several other venues. Get festival details and buy tickets here.

Read the full Huffington Post article here.
 

Craft beer & community development on WVXU


Soapbox Managing Editor John Fox was joined by Michael Albarella from Nine Giant Brewing and Doug Newberry from Wiedemann Brewing March 5 on WVXU's "Cincinnati Edition" program to discuss the upcoming forum on Cincinnati's embrace of craft beer as community development. Nine Giant is building a brewery and taproom in Pleasant Ridge, while Wiedemann is doing likewise in Newport; both plan to be open by fall 2015.

Albarella and Newberry will be panelists, along with Bryant Goulding of Rhinegeist, 5:00-7:00 p.m. March 11 at UC's Niehoff Urban Studio, bringing beer samples as well. The event is free and open to anyone 21 and older.

Read about the March 11 forum and RSVP here.

Listen to the WVXU interview here.

OTR named a "hidden food and drink gem"


The Daily Meal online food and dining website has a travel story about Over-the-Rhine as a "hidden food and drink gem."

"When it comes to great comeback stories, few places can top Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood," says writer Teresa Tobat. "The area was once dubbed 'one of the nation’s most dangerous neighborhoods in the country' and has since been revitalized. And the food scene of Cincinnati's oldest neighborhood — the streets resemble a 1960s New York City — is surprisingly happening."

According to its website, The Daily Meal's "passionate team canvasses the world to bring you the best food and drink experiences at all levels, around the table, at home or on the road. Harvesting the delicious and discarding the mundane, we are your friend on the inside, discovering and reporting with a sense of fun and curiosity."

Read the full article here.
 

New York Times: "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives"


The Feb. 25 issue of The New York Times carries a glowing report, "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives as Riots' Memories Recede," in its real estate section. Read the full article online here.

Times writer Keith Schneider focuses on the high-profile downtown development projects we're familiar with — General Electric's new operations center on The Banks, Dunnhumby's new headquarters building at Fifth and Race, 3CDC's work at Fountain Square and in Over-the-Rhine — to describe Cincinnati as coming a long way since the 2001 riots. Nice photos by Mark Lyons, too.


 

MusicNOW featured in New York Times preview of 2015 music festivals


MusicNOW will celebrate its 10th year in March, when The National's Bryce Dessner expands his annual avant garde music festival to three Over-the-Rhine venues: Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the new Woodward Theater. Despite living in New York City, where he formed The National with brother Aaron and three other Cincinnatians, Dessner has kept his festival rooted in his hometown.

New York Times music writer Jon Pareles takes note of MusicNOW's endurance and unique point of view in his feature story on 2015's upcoming festival gauntlet, "Anticipating Coachella, Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Firefly and More." After previewing the big festivals named in the headline, he says, "A promising development in festival-making, somewhere between the sprawl and the niche, is the growing number often described as 'curated.' ... The curators are often musicians, who tend to delve far beyond their own chosen genres. Musicians listen carefully and widely, and their choices often reveal unexpected foundations and extrapolations of their own aesthetics."

The article has just three photos, including one of MusicNOW from Cincinnatian Keith Klenowski (pictured above).

Read the full article here.
247 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All
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