| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Over-the-Rhine : Cincinnati In The News

305 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincy's 10 most beautiful neighborhoods all have unique identities


Ten Cincinnati neighborhoods have been recognized by Only in Your State as the city's most beautiful. 

Here are the neighborhoods and the reasons these spots are so iconically beautiful.
 
  • Loveland: historic downtown and bike trails
  • Mariemont: European-inspired central business district
  • Hyde Park: estate homes
  • Columbia-Tusculum: "painted ladies" and views of the river
  • Clifton: Gaslight District
  • Over-the-Rhine: new shops, restaurants, small businesses and murals
  • Northside: unique business district
  • Glendale: train that runs through the heart of it
  • Wyoming: historic homes and parks
  • Westwood: "neighborhood" feel and resurgent business district
Read more about these neighborhoods here
 

BLINK not the only draw in Cincinnati


This October brought BLINK to the Queen City, a free, walkable, light and art festival that spanned from The Banks to Findlay Market and included 60 large-scale installations and projections. Over one million people attended, putting it on the radar of people all over the region, and the country.

While in town for BLINK, travel blog Cool Hunting uncovered a myriad of other can't-miss options in town, including the 21c, Findlay Market, the Contemporary Arts Center, the Cincinnati Arts Museum, the Lucky Cat Museum, Taft's Ale House, brewery tours in Over-the-Rhine, the American Sign Museum, Rhinegeist's new restaurant, Music Hall and drinks at Sundry and Vice.

Click here to read more about Cool Hunting's four days of Cincinnati discovery.


 


Behind closed doors: Cincinnati's most beautiful restaurants


Many of Cincinnati's best restaurants are hidden behind unassuming doors. Only in Your State rounded up the top eight local spots that you have to see for yourself.
 
  • Boca
  • Sotto
  • Mita's
  • Restaurant L
  • Metropole
  • Taft's Ale House
  • The Mercer OTR
  • Abigail Street
Click here to see the photos.

 

Five local favorites recognized by Food & Wine


Five local spots on both sides of the river were featured in Food & Wine's Cincinnati City Guide.
 
  • The menu at Carabello Coffee's Analog Coffee Bar has eight different brewing methods on it, and is the place for coffee geeks.
  • Artichoke, located across the street from Findlay Market, is stocked with every cooking gadget you'll ever need.
  • Longfellow is known for its cocktail menu, but there's also a small bites menu that leaves customers wanting more. 
  • Chef Ryan Santos' new restaurant Please is known for its ambitious and tasty dishes.
  • Downtown's 21c is more than just a hotel — it's an art gallery too. 
Read more about Food & Wine's top Cincy stops here.
 

Please Cincinnati jumping on pink trend


The color Millennial Pink is all over the place, from social media to food. It's a shade that restaurants are embracing, including Cincinnati's own Please.

Inside, customers can find locally made light-pink ceramic bowls, pink wine books and checkbooks and Please's Instagram-famous pink-flecked bathroom tile, which was handpainted by Chef Ryan Santos and his girlfriend, Jessie.

Check out other pink restaurant trends here.
 

Cincinnati named the most hipster city in the country


Hipster trends are popping up all over the place: craft coffee, craft beer, local art galleries, etc. Cincinnati has a plethora of all of these, and was recently recognized by Jetsetter.com as the most hipster city in America.

Cincinnati has 19th-century and Art Deco architecture, historic breweries and European-style neighborhoods. But we're also experiencing a cultural revival, with buzzy storefronts, boutique hotels, standout restaurants and hip bars cropping up all over the city. Jetsetter highlighted Over-the-Rhine, which is in the midst of an $80 million revitalization, has cool shops like MiCA 12/V, local art galleries and cafes.

Holtman’s Donuts has taken the city by storm, topping its donuts with maple bacon, cereal or coconut. The Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center is the first freestanding American museum designed by a woman (none other than Zaha Hadid), and it's full of cutting-edge photography, film and performance art; and downtown's 21c Museum Hotel features a free contemporary art gallery, rooftop bar and restaurant.

Read about the other six hipster cities here.
 

Nation's burgers a cut above the rest


Even though most every restaurant menu seems to include a burger, it's hard to come by a true burger joint these days. Thrillist rounded up its top 31 burgers, and Nation's signature burger landed it on this list.

The Nation is a six-ounce Avril Bleh brisket patty topped with smoked cheddar, onion strings, horseradish aioli and whiskey BBQ sauce on a toasted challah bun. Yum.

If you're hungry for a burger, see the rest of the list.

 

Music Hall renovations set the stage for NYC's Geffen Hall


The New York Philharmonic's performance space, David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, is in desperate need of renovations. But it just scrapped a $500 million gut renovation, unlike Cincinnati's Music Hall, which just underwent a $135 million renovation.

On Oct. 6, Music Hall reopened with much pomp and circumstance. The two-year renovation paid off — patrons are now "closer to the music," as the CSO's Louis Langrée put it.

Read the New York Times' article about how Cincy is leading the way for Geffen Hall's proposed transformation.

You can read our full Cincy Sets the Stage series about Music Hall's renovation here
 

Beer is rebooting Cincinnati neighborhoods


"Beer is bringing back our neighborhoods." Mayor John Cranley, 2017 State of the City address

Food & Wine recently dived into this statement, and found that Cranley is right. According to numbers from the Brewers Association, which represents the interests of small and independent breweries nationwide, craft brewing contributed about $68 billion to the economy last year, and created nearly half a million jobs.

Cincinnati is currently home to over 40 breweries, and another 11 are in the works. It's evident that neighborhood breweries are helping boost the city's economy — brewery owners are renovating buildings, hiring local workers and boosting the local economy.

Food & Wine highlighted four breweries — Brink, Rhinegeist, Urban Artifact and Woodburn — that are doing all of the above.

Click here to read more about Cincinnati's booming brewconomy.
 

BLINK: by the numbers


This past weekend, nearly one million people descended on Over-the-Rhine and downtown for the first ever BLINK Cincinnati. The four-day art and light festival covered 20 city blocks and incorporated local and international talent. 

Here are some of the big numbers:
 
  • More than 2,500 people participated in Thursday's BLINK Future City Spectacular light parade; about 100,000 people attended the parade
  • Twenty-two projection mappings and 35 light-based art installations were strategically placed from Findlay Market to The Banks
  • Eight new murals were painted by international artists
  • Thirty entertainers performed throughout the weekend on six stages
  • 500 volunteers worked to make BLINK possible
  • More than 100 artists participated in the festival, with 60 from the region
  • About 27,000 rides were taken on the Cincinnati Bell Connector
To see photos from BLINK, search #blinkcincinnati on Instagram.
 

 


OTR named one of five Great Neighborhoods by the APA


Last week, the American Planning Association named Over-the-Rhine one of five Great Neighborhoods on its annual Great Places in America list. The list marks the kick-off for the APA’s National Community Planning Month celebration.

Like much of the city, OTR has undergone huge changes in the past 15 years, and it's now considered one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Planning efforts showcase the historic nature of OTR and will help preserve the neighborhood’s legacy.

As part of the distinction, Mayor John Cranley declared Oct. 4 “Over-the-Rhine ‘Great Neighborhood’ Day” in Cincinnati.

Through continued public-private partnerships and the ongoing support of the community’s residents, developers have been able to restore historic buildings like Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the former St. Paul's Evangelical Church (now home to Taft's Ale House); create community gathering spaces like Washington Park and Ziegler Park; and create new housing options all over OTR.

Along with OTR, APA also recognized Seward in Minneapolis; the Heart of Missoula; Uptown Greenwood, SC; and Pearl in San Antonio.

Click here to read more about APA's Great Places in America. 
 


Cincinnati is the coolest in the Midwest


We don't need to be told that Cincinnati is a cool place to live, but the website Only in Your State recently rounded up all of the reasons why.

Things that make the Queen City so cool are:

  • The growth in Over-the-Rhine
  • Its growing food scene
  • How it celebrates the arts
  • The craft beer
  • Its efforts to preserve historic landmarks
  • The riverfront views
  • The parks
  • Fiona
  • Its celebrations

To read more, click here.
 


Nine Cincy restaurants are experts at the social media game


Illumen Media recently examined the social media accounts of 100 Greater Cincinnati restaurants, and came up with nine whose social marketing and online customer interaction are on-point.
 
  • Buzzed Bull Creamery: The relatively new alcoholic ice cream shop posts photos of its food, which sells — both the food and the business. Plus, they regularly interact with their customers on all social media platforms. @buzzedbullcreamery
  • Mac Shack and other 4EG-owned restaurants: This new restaurant concept is constantly changing its menu, and its social media game. @macshackclifton
  • Grand Central Deli: This New York-style deli has everything: a great concept, great food, strong graphics and excellent digital marketing. Everything ties back to the 1920s vibe. @gcdeli
  • Mac's Pizza Pub: This bar/pizza joint manages social media for all four of its locations, with a separate social presence for each spot. No matter the location, they're always promoting the game of the day and their events. @macspizzapub
  • Arnold's Bar & Grill: As the oldest tavern in town, it's had to adapt to the changing digital landscape. Event updates and unique local partnerships consistently receive high audience engagement. @arnolds_cincinnati
  • Bard's Burgers: A small, single-location dive in Covington that posts multiple times a day. They've created a community around their restaurant and regularly feature customers and competitions. @bardsburgers
  • Injoy Street Food: As a mobile food stand, digital marketing is super important. The images place Injoy's colorful food front-and-center, and their social channels consistently update customers on where to find them. @injoystreetfood
  • Court Street Lobster Bar: A one-of-a-kind concept in Cincy, Court Street Lobster uses that to its advantage. Specials and regular updates are super important too. @courtstlobster
  • Che: This Argentinian spot frequently changes its menu, and its social media accounts let customers know to come get its limited-time offers. @che_cincinnati
To read more about the restaurants that are playing the digital game right and for some takeaways from each, click here.
 

Cincy recognized as one of the top destinations for design this fall


Architectural Digest sought out the top five travel destinations this fall for those interested in design, and Cincinnati made the list. Other cities include Mexico City; Washington, D.C.; Shenzhen, China; and New York's Hudson Valley. 

October is a busy month for Cincinnati, with events like the first-ever BLINK festival (Oct. 12-15) and DesignBuildCincy (Oct. 28 & 29). Design-lovers can also appreciate the historic buildings like those designed by Samuel Hannaford (Music Hall, City Hall, the Cincinnati Observatory and the Mutual Building in NKY, just to name a few). 

AD suggests staying at the 21c Musuem Hotel and checking out the Contemporary Arts Center, which was designed by Zaha Hadid. 
 

NYT spends 36 hours in the Queen City


The New York Times recently spent 36 hours in Cincinnati, and boy, were they impressed.

Highligts include the Contemporary Arts Center, 21C's bar, dinner at Sotto, Cincy Red Bike, the views from the Purple People Bridge, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Findlay Market, the streetcar, beer from Rhinegeist and Taft's Ale House, Salazar, Music Hall, Ensemble Theater, the new Cincinnati Shakespeare Company theater, Sundry and Vice, Revel OTR, Maplewood Kitchen and Bar and the Queen City Underground Tour.

Check out your hometown from the NYT's perspective, and you just might discover something new!
 
305 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts