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Innovation News

CitiLogics software designed to improve urban water supplies

Two local environmental engineers are pouring their skills and passion into a new custom software program that will help city governments and public utilities better manage their water infrastructure.

Their effort, CitiLogics, was founded 2009 in by Jim Uber, an environmental engineer at the University of Cincinnati and and Stu Hooper, who has more than 15 years experience in drinking water treatment optimization and distribution system water quality. Together, they have previous experience in systems analysis, and business and software development.

CitiLogics is gearing up to launch Polaris, a real-time forecasting platform that uses existing water management data to help utilities better control their water distribution systems. The software will allow utilities to better pinpoint leak sources, and improve water quality in the distribution system, among other things. It will also forecast how a particular part of the infrastructure would hold up in an emergency or a heavy use period.

The software then allows departments to share that information easily, Hooper says.

"Right now a lot of that data just sits there. It literally goes into a database and one person may see it before it's stored. Right now between 2 and 40 percent of water is lost through leaks; through this modeling the infrastructure can be better maintained. We are convinced if (utilities) have useful information through math modeling and analysis techniques, they can save money, enhance water quality and make work more fun and interesting," Hooper says.

CitiLogics is housed in the Hamilton incubation County Business Center, a nationally recognized business incubator. CitiLogics has hired one employee and plans to hire another one by the end of year ahead of a planned initial release of Polaris in the spring of 2012. The company is meeting with municipalities for potential early sales and the software is being tested through a pilot at the Northern Kentucky Water District.

By Feoshia Henderson
Follow Feoshia on Twitter @feoshiawrites 
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