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Community Matters moves forward with Washing Well

The average middle class family spends less than one percent of its income on laundry, while residents of Lower Price Hill spend, on average, one-ninth of their income on laundry, according to Jen Walters, Community Matters’ president and founder.
 
“There’s about 600 families—over 90 percent of our neighbors are renters—and the vast majority rely on public transportation,” Walters says. “There’s a high percentage of female-headed households, and $9,600 is the average annual salary. Our community is full of strong hardworking people, but they don’t have access to things others sometimes take for granted.”
 
Currently there’s a lack of access to a local laundry facility, but that’s about to change, as the nonprofit gears up to implement plans for what will eventually become a worker-operated cooperative—the Washing Well project—which will “create a community laundromat to meet the severe need for access to safe, affordable and local laundry in the Lower Price Hill neighborhood.”
 
Now, rather than having to take two bus trips—potentially accompanied by children—and spend about five hours at a laundromat, residents will be able to access laundry facilities without having to leave the neighborhood.
 
After taking care of the barrier regarding access, Walters says the organization needed to address affordability.
 
“It will be priced below the market but [will] still [generate] enough to be sustainable,” Walters says. “We’ll sell detergent by the cup, because buying that detergent from the beginning was often a barrier, and they were trying to stretch it out as long as they could, which took away from the hygienic aspect for doing laundry in the first place.”
 
If the price point is still an issue, there will be nonmonetary options, like volunteering, which residents can engage in, so they can earn washes and dries; and the space itself will become more than just a laundromat.
 
Instead of sitting around waiting for clothes, residents will be able to work with an Americorps member, who will provide assistance in connecting them to jobs and resources—an added benefit, in addition to access to clean clothes.
 
“It may be the difference that stops people from thinking they can’t go for a job,” Walters says. “It can provide that confidence for kids at school and [instill a sense of] self-worth.” 

Do Good:

•    Volunteer with Community Matters.

•    Support Community Matters by donating.

•    Connect with Community Matters on Facebook.
 

Impact 100 funds three grantees, enables transformation

At its annual awards ceremony last week, Impact 100 awarded $327,000 to three local nonprofits in the form of three $109,000 transformational grants—a record for the all-female philanthropic organization who awarded two $108,000 grants at last year’s event.  
 
The Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati, Price Hill Will’s MYCincinnati and Community Matters’ Washing Well project were this year’s recipients.
 
The funds will enable the LNGC to extend its reach by implementing its Adult and Children’s Basic Reading Programs in the Price Hill and Avondale Communities.
 
MYCincinnati (Music for Youth) will reach more students, as the organization can now double its hours of operation and expand its age-range offerings.
 
And Community Matters will now be able to implement its Washing Well project, which will enable the organization to build a laundromat to serve Lower Price Hill residents who currently have no easy access to laundry facilities.
 
“It's very amazing—humbling—to be part of it—inspiring—and just, wow,” says Lisa Kaminski, Impact 100 member and vice president. “I was part of the team that worked for years to break three grants and I'm a total jumble of emotions.”
 
Since its first grantee in 2002, Impact 100 has awarded $2.8 million to 25 nonprofits who are able to create “magic in their communities,” says Sharon Mitchell, Impact 100 president.
 
Cincinnati Community ToolBank and Welcome House of Northern Kentucky were this year’s other two finalists, and it’s always difficult, members say, to not be able to fund all five groups. But they aim to change that, as the organization continues to grow.
 
At the awards ceremony this year, enough pledges were made to enable Impact 100 to commit to again giving three grants next year, but the goal is to award four or even five, and certainly even more, in years to come.
 
“One of the someday-projects on my list is trying to capture the ripple effect of Impact 100,” Kaminski says. “The number of lives impacted by those who have received grants, and also the impact on those who were not granted one. We’ve already heard that Cincinnati ToolBank has gotten a 12-foot covered trailer donated—so, wow.” 

Do Good:

•    Join Impact 100 so you can help the organization further its reach in the community. 

•    If you're a nonprofit with a plan to transform lives through your work, check back Oct. 27 for information on how to apply for one of next year's grants

•    Spread the word about Impact 100 by connecting with the organization and sharing its Facebook page.
 

Zip-lining, canoeing, river swimming among free Great Outdoor Weekend events

The 11th annual Great Outdoor Weekend is upon us, and with 125 free events and programs at 42 locations in eight counties spanning the Tri-State, it’s an event that Brewster Rhoads, executive director of Green Umbrella, says is not to be missed.
 
“Cincinnati was ranked No. 1 in America by the Academy of Sports Medicine this past spring when it comes to outdoor recreational infrastructure—trails, parks, campgrounds, rivers—but the health condition of our citizenry was No. 38 out of 50,” Rhoads says.
 
“So part of what we’re about is connecting our citizens in the region to the recreational opportunities we have.”
 
The weekend’s events, taking place September 27-28, will feature opportunities for all. Zip-lining across our region’s tree canopy, canoeing, kayaking and even swimming across the Ohio River are just a few of the options offered.
 
“It has become one of the largest—if not the largest—outdoor education and recreation samplers in the country,” Rhoads says. “It’s a way to introduce people—parents with kids, millennials and others—to the critical recreational and nature education opportunities in the region.”
 
According to Rhoads, Greater Cincinnati’s vibrant outdoor culture is a benefit to all who inhabit the area, and it’s an asset to our city, in that it's an attractor of young talent.
 
“You don’t have to live in Portland to bike to work, for example,” Rhoads says.
 
And according to Rhoads, that’s evidenced by the fact that Cincinnati was listed, for the first-time ever, as one of the top-50 bike-friendly cities in America.
 
“We don’t claim that we make all this happen,” Rhoads says. “But we play a role in being a facilitator as a promoter of collaboration to move this area forward.” 

Do Good:

•    Attend one, or multiple events at Great Outdoor Weekend.

•    If you can't make it out to Great Outdoor Weekend, check out Meet Me Outdoors! for a listing of free outdoor activities to engage in on a more frequent basis.

•    Get involved with Green Umbrella.
 

Healthy Roots Foundation continues Bluegrass for Babies, rebrands to expand education and outreach

The Healthy Roots Foundation, formerly Bluegrass for Babies, will host its sixth annual benefit concert Saturday to support Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s Perinatal Institute.
 
The nonprofit rebranded itself this year in an effort to better reflect its focus on educational outreach for familial health education.
 
“[The name] Bluegrass for Babies no longer made sense for everything we’re doing,” says Anne Schneider, who founded the organization with her husband, Matt, in 2009. “It made sense for one of our events. So basically, it’s grown so much—we thought that the Healthy Roots Foundation was a name that represents the true essence of trying to create healthy families and improve children’s health.”
 
Since 2009, Bluegrass for Babies has raised nearly $100,000 for Cincinnati Children’s, which Schneider says she’s “incredibly humbled and thrilled” to have accomplished, because the concert—now hosted at Sawyer Point—initially began as a backyard party.
 
As the event has grown, so has the nonprofit’s goals and outreach.
 
“We’ve realized there’s a big gap in education for families—health education in general—and people really aren’t getting the knowledge they need to make good decisions,” Schneider says.
 
So at this year’s concert, six interactive experiences—all aimed at empowering families with healthy decision-making capabilities—will complement the festivities.
 
The activities are similar in nature to some of the play-based activities the nonprofit has hosted at the Cincinnati Museum Center, for example.
 
“We have a make-your-own pizza garden, so it’s a gardening activity where kids learn how it’s made,” Schneider says. “And then once it’s made or taken home and planted, we give them basil seeds, and we give them recipes to make their own pizza with it—so they’re looking at where it’s coming from, how it’s made, and then that’s your food—so it impacts your nutrition and healthy choices.” 

Do Good:

•    Support the organization in its efforts to raise funds for Cincinnati Children's Perinatal Institute by purchasing a ticket to attend Bluegrass for Babies. One-hundred percent of proceeds from food purchased at the event, from both Green BEAN Delivery and Mama Mimi's, will also benefit the Perinatal Institute. 

•    Support the Healthy Roots Foundation by giving.

•    Connect with the nonprofit on Facebook.
 

HOME encourages dialogue, shares best practices for stronger communities

Housing Opportunities Made Equal will host a forum next month to generate discussions about best practices for community building.
 
Hello Neighbor: Using the Power of Connection to Strengthen Your Community will focus on what it means to be a resident of a changing neighborhood and how to turn the concept of “us vs. them” into “us and them” so individuals can work collectively to make neighbors feel welcome.  
 
For Lisa Auciello, Northside resident and active member of Community Council, sharing best practices within communities is a great way to initiate discussions that call upon all voices to speak up.
 
“The intent is to bring different neighborhood people together, and not just the same ones who are the regular outspoken activist people, but to bring a different group of people together to talk about ideas, techniques and strategies they can use to build community in their own neighborhoods,” Auciello says.
 
Teens and adults are encouraged to attend the forum, and it’s important that teens offer their own insights as well, Auciello says, because they should be engaged and feel a part of their neighborhoods just as much as anyone else.
 
“I think it’s important to just be friendly and withhold judgment,” Auciello says. “I think a lot of times we walk around a neighborhood and automatically make assumptions about what a person does.”
 
With regard to youth, one of the most beneficial things people can do is “to just stop looking at them like they’re up to something bad,” Auciello says.
 
“Instead, go up to them and say, ‘Hey, where do you guys go to school? What’s your name? How’s it going?’ I think that’s a huge thing to being a neighbor.” 

Do Good: 

•    Contact Myra Calder to reserve your spot at the roundtable discussion Oct. 2 from 6-8 p.m.

•    Reach out to your neighbors. Introduce yourself, and be a resource to one another.

•    Support HOME by becoming a member.
 

Village Life Outreach Project celebrates 10 years of impact

Village Life Outreach Project will celebrate 10 years as a nonprofit Friday at its Diamond Gala: Night on the Serengeti.
 
The nonprofit, whose mission is to “unite communities to promote life, health and education,” has a lot to celebrate, as the organization has reached some important milestones throughout the past decade.
 
More than 400 local volunteers, for example, have given freely of their time to engage in service learning and health care initiatives in three villages of Tanzania.
 
“Just knowing we’ve been able to unite this many people behind a cause, both people from Tanzania and the Greater Cincinnati area and beyond—being able to focus on how to make people’s lives better—that’s probably been the biggest reward,” says Chris Lewis, founder.
 
One of the nonprofit’s most notable successes is opening Tanzania’s first-ever health care center, which has served more than 20,000 villagers since 2011.
 
Lewis says he remembers his first trip to the region in 2003 when he was in the University of Cincinnati’s family medicine residency training program.
 
“On a daily basis, people would be brought in to the hospital I was working at, having died having to have made the arduous journey from the remote outlying regions,” Lewis says. “The first patient I remember was a pregnant lady who had bled to death having tried to walk eight hours to get to the hospital to deliver her child, and that sort of thing leaves a permanent mark on you.”
 
Village Life Outreach Project has also collaborated with Engineers without Borders, through both its student chapter at UC and its local professional chapter, to teach villagers how to build sustainable and structurally sound buildings and to begin digging water wells so villagers can access clean drinking water.
 
“Everyone comes to Tanzania thinking they’re going to really make a difference and change the world, and by all working together—yeah, we’ve made some great progress—but the biggest change I think comes to the volunteers themselves,” Lewis says. “I think their lives are changed in this experience, when they get over there and feel what it means to work in partnership with people who need you. That makes all the difference in the world.” 

Do Good: 

•    Join Village Life Outreach Project at Night on the Serengeti for an evening of celebration and a keynote address delivered by Oscar and Emmy Award-Winning Actor Louis Gossett, Jr. 

•    Support Village Life Outreach Project by donating.

•    Contact the nonprofit to learn more and figure out how you can get involved.

Impact 100 member grows, spreads philanthropic values to young members

Emily Throckmorton learned the value of philanthropy at a young age.
 
At age 18, she’s the youngest member of Impact 100, a group of women who work collectively to make a difference in the community by pooling funds to award significant grants to nonprofits.
 
Last year, the organization was able to provide Crayons to Computers and Easter Seals TriState | Building Value with $108,000 grants; and this year, membership has grown, so three nonprofits will receive $109,000 grants.
 
“You’re basically putting your faith in these organizations and choosing who you want to help and how you want to help them, and the whole experience is amazing,” says Throckmorton, who’s received membership as a gift for the past two years.
 
Throckmorton just began her freshman year at Purdue University, so as a college freshman, and certainly as a high school student, contributing to a philanthropic organization isn’t always financially feasible. But in Throckmorton’s case, her membership has been a much better gift than any material possessions could have been.
 
“This is something I will continue, not just at school, but through the rest of my life,” Throckmorton says. “Seeing the money they had spent the whole year raising going toward these amazing causes—I really want to stay involved and help out doing something like this because I love helping others.” 

Do Good:

•    Check out this year's five grant finalists, and attend the Annual Awards Celebration September 16 when this year's recipients will be announced. 

•    Help Impact 100 continue to grow. The organization is always looking for new members, particularly young professionals, so it can sustain itself and further its community impact for years to come. Consider joining.

•    If you're a nonprofit, learn about how to apply for next year's grant, and stay connected with the organization through Facebook to keep up with the latest news and updates.
 

NKY veteran to receive free home repairs

For 75-year old veteran Raymond Muench, climbing a ladder to engage in activities like painting and caulking around the outside windows is not as simple of a task as it once was.
 
He says he’s grateful for those in his life—like the individuals at People Working Cooperatively and the volunteers from Home Depot’s Repair Affair—who are able to provide him help when it’s needed.
 
Muench was born in Cincinnati and grew up in Northern Kentucky before spending four years in active duty with the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War.
 
Though never stationed in Asia, the whole time he was gone, Muench says he was eagerly anticipating his return to his hometown that he had come to appreciate for its cultural diversity and attitude of goodwill toward others.
 
“What was really a shock and an eye opener for me was they sent me to Donaldson Air Force Base for the first year I was in the service in late 1961, and I remember when I got off the airplane down there and went into the local airport terminal, I saw where there were signs at water fountains for ‘colored only’ or ‘white only,’” Muench says. “And I couldn’t believe what in the world I was looking at.”
 
Serving others and approaching all individuals as equally important is just second nature for Muench.
 
So when PWC approached him with the news that his home would be one of 11 projects this summer serviced by Home Depot employees taking the day to volunteer with the Repair Affair program, he was nothing but gracious.
 
“I mentioned to the fellow who was here from PWC, that the way I look at this—my perspective on the matter—it’s that the turnabout’s fair play, so to speak,” Muench says. “And when they come here, it’s not a case of people just thanking me for my service. I will definitely be thanking them wholeheartedly as well for their service.”

Do Good:

•    Help others like Muench by volunteering with PWC.

•    If you or someone you know might qualify for PWC's services, apply.

•    Support PWC by donating.

Rothenberg rooftop garden will give OTR students new growth opportunities

Rothenberg Preparatory Academy will see the completion of its 8,500-square-foot rooftop teaching garden this year, thanks to many donations and supporters in the local community. 

Edwin “Pope” Coleman, rooftop project manager, has worked with the Over-The-Rhine Foundation for the past eight years to bring the rooftop garden to life

When Rothenberg was vacant and facing demolition, Coleman, as well as many residents of the community, approached Cincinnati Public Schools and asked for a renovation instead of a replacement.  

“[Rothenberg] was a flagship and point of pride for the neighborhood,” says Bryna Bass, full-time teacher and garden manager. “The community fought hard to prevent it from being torn down.” 

With the understanding that CPS wouldn’t be responsible for providing anything more than the space, the OTR Foundation took on fiscal responsibility and began restoring Rothenberg through Coleman’s vision. 

Fundraising for the rooftop garden began in late 2008, and more than $300,000 has been raised since then. The recent Midsummer Night’s Gala raised additional funding also need for construction and operation.

The teaching garden, which was once a playground, will allow students to explore science and nature. The developed curriculum uses garden-based lessons to deepen students' educational experience through hands-on problem-solving activities, Bass says.

The rooftop teaching garden educational program will launch at the beginning of the 2014-15 academic year. 

Do Good:
  • Visit Rothenberg and go on a tour of the garden. 
  • “Like” the rooftop garden progress on Facebook. 
  • Make a donation to the OTR Foundation

Occupational therapist founds volunteer group for Summit clients

In her four years as an occupational therapist at Summit Behavioral Healthcare, Laura Menze says she’s noticed her clients’ strong desire to be helpful.
 
“They enjoy working around the unit, whether that’s wiping tables or watering plants, so they have a longing to engage in productive occupations,” Menze says.
 
Clients are sometimes limited, however, when it comes to engaging in meaningful work outside of the facility.
 
So Menze started a volunteer group that allows Summit’s clients to work with one another, in a safe environment, for a positive cause.
 
“Most have been on the receiving end of things for most of their lives and are grateful for the services they receive, but this puts them in the position of the ones who can give, and that’s significant,” Menze says.
 
The volunteer group meets once a week, and for the past few months, Menze says about 10 males have joined together to do things like plant seed trays for Peaslee Neighborhood Center’s Early Learning Center, make birthday cards for residents at Lydia’s House, craft packets for children at the Ronald McDonald House, and fleece blankets to donate to The Healing Center.
 
“I think they’ve taken pride in their work,” Menze says. “There’s just a great amount of stigma related to this population of folks; so to be able to hear, ‘Thank you for what you did. That was really meaningful. Someone will be grateful,’—that provides something for their self-esteem, their self-worth.” 

Do Good:

•    Contact Laura Menze if you're a nonprofit interested in a collaborative volunteer opportunity that could be completed on site at Summit. 

•    Volunteer with a local nonprofit.

•    Support a cause you're passionate about.

The Kentucky Project shares beauty, betters lives of others

Chris Egan founded The Kentucky Project this past November in an effort to share the state’s beauty and culture, while also enriching the lives of those who inhabit it—all for the purpose of creating positive change.
 
Though the organization is still, as Egan calls it, “a baby,” the most recent added component is the launch of the photo sales website.
 
For each purchase of a print showcasing the beauty Kentucky has to offer, the organization will donate 25 percent of the profits to a local nonprofit.
 
The Healthy Newborns Project, which is the collaborative effort of Transitions Inc. and The Leadership Northern Kentucky Class of 2014, is The Kentucky Project’s photo sales program’s first recipient.
 
According to Transitions, Inc., the number of drug addicted babies born in the state of Kentucky between 2000-2009 increased 2,400 percent.
 
To help mitigate the rising number of unhealthy births, The Healthy Newborns Project aims to provide a safe place for women who are recovering from drug addiction so they can “deliver a healthy, drug-free baby.”
 
Women continue to receive support in the transitional home for up to four months after giving birth.
 
For Egan, it’s important to donate 25 percent of the photo sales profits because the basis of The Kentucky Project is to help others.
 
“We share photos of Kentucky to show its beauty and do what we can to help Kentucky organizations and individuals spread their message,” Egan says. “We've already been a small part of many important issues, and we hope to be more helpful and become a bigger soundboard in the future.” 

Do Good: 

•    Support The Kentucky Project and The Healthy Newborns Project by purchasing prints.

•    Connect with The Kentucky Project on Facebook.

•    Contact The Kentucky Project if there is an important issue you're concerned about.

Historic Cincinnati photos show city's progress throughout the past century

Treasures in Black & White, a new exhibit at the Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC), is a collection of photographs and artifacts from Cincinnati dating back to the 1860s. Scott Gampfer, director of the CMC’s History Library and Archives, was instrumental in putting the exhibit together.

“The exhibit provides a glimpse into a century of the life of Cincinnati,” Gampfer says. “Visitors will see through the images how much the city has changed, and how many things have remained constant. For example, although electric cars are seen as cutting-edge technology today, the exhibit features a photograph of a woman charging up her electric car in 1912.”

“The photographs in the exhibit are augmented by display cases containing historic artifacts and archival materials that relate to specific images in the exhibit. These objects and archival materials help bring the photographs to life,” Gampfer says. “The images depict the city’s changing built environment, sports, entertainment, business, social activities, daily life, lighthearted moments and some difficult moments in the life of the city.”

What’s Gampfer’s favorite photo in the exhibit?

“One of my favorites is the image of the “balloon man” selling a balloon to a young client outside of Redland Field in 1929 while a police officer watches over the transaction," he says. "It’s whimsical, yet is a compelling atmospheric street shot from the 1920s. The photo doesn’t actually show Redland Field, which is behind the photographer, but the exhibit includes a nearby case with various artifacts and archival materials relating to the ballpark.”

Gampfer says the exhibit concept is based on a book project that CMC did along with Turner Publishing in 2006 titled “Historic Photographs of Cincinnati.” It featured more than 200 black and white images from the CMC collection. Re-released in 2013, the idea of basing the 2014 Treasures Exhibit on the images selected for that book was sparked.

“The exhibit curatorial team selected 65 images from the 200 in the book and tried to maintain the book’s diversity of subject matter and time periods,” Gampfer says. “High-resolution digital scans were made of the original source photos from the collection, and from these scans, high-quality black and white 16-by-20-inch prints were made. The prints were then matted and framed.”

July 28 marks the 100-year anniversary of Austria-Hungary’s declaration of war against Serbia, which effectively started World War I. With “the war to end all wars” on the world’s mind, it's fascinating to see authentic Cincinnati relics from the homefront at that time.

Treasures in Black & White runs at the Cincinnati Museum Center until October 12.
 

E-Waste recycling drive saves 75 tons of electronics from landfills

With the beginning of May came the fifth annual Players for the Planet electronic waste recycling drive. The four-day drive ran from May 1-4, and an estimated total of 150,000 pounds (75 tons) of e-waste, including cellphones, computers and printers, was collected.
 
The annual recycling drive came together through a partnership between many different organizations. Players for the Planet, a nonprofit organization designed to bring professional athletes together to inspire and educate communities about environmental issues, partnered with the Cincinnati Reds, who co-sponsored the event and had players like Jay Bruce and Mike Leake in attendance.
 
Additional sponsors included Cohen Recycling, PNC Bank, Macy’s, Remke Markets, Kroger, Duke Energy, Green Umbrella Cincinnati, the recycling and solid waste district of Cambell, Hamilton and Butler Counties, and more.
 
“Over 70 percent of electronic waste ends up in landfills and is not properly disposed of,” says Brewster Rhoads, executive director of Green Umbrella, an alliance of organizations in the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana tri-state area working to preserve the region's greenspace. “This is one opportunity to make sure that doesn’t happen; Cohen Recycling has the highest standard you can achieve for proper recycling of electronic equipment, so they are an important partner in this event.”
 
The recycling drive took over a different parking lot each day, taking place outside of PNC locations in Colerain, West Chester, Hyde Park and Newport. In total, 1,669 cars participated.
 
“As far as I know, this is the largest recycling drive of its kind in the country,” Rhoads says. “It’s grown considerably each year, from the amount of sponsors to the amount of e-waste we’ve recycling. We’re really lucky to have the support of the entire Reds organization on this. They’ve helped us take the issue of recycling away from being something political and simply make it a mainstream value.”

Eleven local communities receive grants to increase physical fitness opportunities

Eleven area communities and organizations are the recipients of Interact for Health grants to develop or improve upon spaces for physical activity.
 
“It’s all about creating infrastructure in places where people can be physically active,” says Jaime Love, Interact for Health’s program officer for healthy eating and active living.
 
The Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington, for example, was one the eleven organizations awarded; and as a result, Latonia Elementary School will be the site of a new area from which the whole community can benefit.
 
“They worked in partnership to convert the dilapidated playground at the school and turn it into a community park,” Love says. “So there’ll be a new playground, fitness equipment—there’ll be a walking track—and it really will be something that both the school and the community residents can enjoy.”
 
Other organizations will receive things like a pool lift to increase accessibility, and exercise equipment to add to a fitness trail.
 
According to Love, creating a culture of wellness where people have easy access to physical activity is the goal.
 
“We want to encourage public places that are free of charge as well, because we know cost can be a barrier to some people being able to participate,” Love says.
 
“So when we have lots of public spaces that are safe and up to date and easily accessible—people can walk or bike to them, they’re not too far away from their homes—that just increases the likelihood that they can get out with their family and friends and have some activity on a regular basis.”

Do Good:

•    Check out the 11 physical activity and environments grantees, and make use of the spaces when they become available for use.

•    If you're interested in applying for a grant to receive funds for physical activity environments in 2015, there is still time. Proposals are due by noon, May 1. 

•    Connect with Interact for Health on Facebook.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

Metro launches year-long contest to promote green living

Metro kicked off a new initiative this Earth Day by launching a year-long contest that gives riders an incentive to recycle their used passes.
 
“Drop It In To Win” encourages riders to submit their used 30-day passes, stored value cards or 1-ride tickets for the chance to win a duplicate copy of their submission.
 
“Here at our offices, we’re big on recycling,” says Jill Dunne, Metro’s public affairs manager. “We added stored-value cards, so there’s more and more paper out there, and we thought this would be a good way to reward our riders and also be environmentally friendly, because at the end of the year, we’re going to recycle all of them.”
 
Five winners have already received their free passes, and five more will be selected at the beginning of each month for the next year.
 
“Someone could win a pass of up to $170 dollars value if they had a Zone 5, 30-day rolling pass and put that in there,” Dunne says.
 
According to Dunne, being environmentally friendly is one of Metro’s priorities, and doing what it can to improve the quality of life within our community is key.
 
“If you’re interested in the environment, if you want to improve the quality of life for your community, riding on Metro is going to provide that opportunity,” Dunne says. “There’s less pollution—it’s an opportunity for you to get out of the car—and a full bus can take up to 50 cars off the road, so that’s going to be a lot of pollution you’re going to save if you’re riding the bus.” 

Do Good:

•    Get the deals on the contest, and Drop It In To Win

•    Ride the Metro

•    Like Cincinnati Metro on Facebook.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 
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