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Architecture + Design : For Good

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Local creatives raise nearly $10K for Make-A-Wish


Halloween has come and gone, but the impacts of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) Cincinnati chapter’s latest fundraiser are long lasting.  The group hosted GUTS: Creatives Carving for Kids at Washington Park last month and raised nearly $10,000 for Make-A-Wish Southern Ohio. The “pipeline of eligible children” continues to grow with the proximity of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.
 
“We raised more than enough for one wish,” said Jay Shifman of Make-A-Wish Shifman said noting that they work to grant the wish of every child facing a life threatening illness in our community.
 
AIGA to surpassed fundraising goal of $8,000 (the average cost of one wish) by $1,200.
 
The winning Team LPK carved “Haunted OTR"  four pumpkins, side-by-side, depicting the local streetscape.  
 
“GUTS is a part of AIGA Cincinnati’s larger ‘Design for Good’ initiative,” said Phil Rowland, architect and AIGA member. “We believe design can make a difference in our community.”

Do Good: 

•    It's not too late to donate. Contribute here.

•    Sign up to be a sponsor for next year's GUTS. It's never too early.

•    There are many ways to help grant wishes. Learn about them here.
 

Beaux Arts Ball to honor Art Academy of Cincinnati supporters & donors who helped with its OTR move


The Art Academy of Cincinnati (AAC) is honoring its students, faculty, donors and supporters at its Beaux Arts Ball on Friday, Oct. 23 at the Verdin Bell Event Centre in Pendleton.
 
The event will celebrate the 10th anniversary of AAC's move from its longtime home base adjacent to the Cincinnati Art Museum in Eden Park to a 112,000-square-foot campus in Over-the-Rhine.
 
The masquerade party will focus on a central Venice theme, featuring gondolas and masks hand-crafted by AAC students and will feature performances by bands Burning Caravan and Groove Session. Key supporters who helped AAC move its campus in 2005 will be honored at the ball.
 
“Part of what makes this so special is the people who made it possible to move into our building 10 years ago,” says AAC Vice President of Institutional Advancement Joan Kaup. “We want to publicly and properly thank several of them who either invested financially or helped us making strong connections so that AAC could become an anchor in this creative community.”

Do Good:

Register for tickets to attend the Beaux Arts Ball 7 p.m.-midnight Oct. 23 at Verdin Bell Event Centre, 444 Reading Road.

• Visit AAC on Final Fridays for art exhibits that are free to the public.

Enroll in Community Art Education classes at the AAC.
 

COV200 seeks input for what to put inside Covington bicentennial's time capsule


Covington residents, business owners and friends recently voted to determine the winning Covington Bourbon Barrel design for a time capsule they’re creating in commemoration of Covington’s bicentennial. Now COV200 — the volunteers behind the year-long celebration of all things Covington, who aim to showcase the city’s rich 200-year history, culture and potential — is working with the community to determine the time capsule’s contents.
 
“We have received quite a few ideas from the community, including 2015 mint coins, menus from all Covington restaurants, the Covingtonopoly game, photos of families, letters from kids to future kids, list of top music in 2015, the COV200 book and much more,” says Kate Esarey, COV200 Project Manager and Community Development Specialist at The Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington.
 
The time capsule itself, designed by local maker Steven Sander, will be created from the reclaimed floor of a home on Scott Street. Once filled, it will be preserved in a glass case and put on display in the new Hellman Creative Center next summer, where it will remain until 2115.
 
“I think a time capsule is a great way for our community to reflect on Covington’s 200th year and explore what makes our community special,” Esarey says. “I hope folks in 2115 will really enjoy understanding how we perceived Covington in 2015 and what made it unique 100 years prior.”

Do Good: 

• Contribute your ideas for the content within the time capsule by contacting Kate Esarey.

• Connect with COV200 on Facebook to keep up with upcoming events. 

Support The Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington.
 

Local AIA chapter sponsors photo contest to benefit Little League team for kids with disabilities


Major League Baseball's 2015 All-Star Game is little more than a month away, but don’t wait until July to share your love of the game with others.
 
The American Institute of Architects’ Cincinnati chapter (AIA) is sponsoring a competition titled "Fields of Dreams" so baseball fans can highlight their own stories through photos that showcase the built environment surrounding the game. Photos can range in composition — everything from the design of professional stadiums to the dugouts at local parks.
 
Contest submissions are $10 each and benefit Butler County Challenger Baseball, a league designed to “meet the needs of children and young adults from 5 to 22 years of age with special needs.”
 
If you’re not submitting a photo but just want to support your favorite entry, each vote will cost you $1 and also benefit the Challenger league.
 
For Butler County Challenger President Alan Lakamp, whose son has Down syndrome, the league is particularly special because it enables kids to live out their dreams.
 
“It’s every child's dream to be a able to play the great game of baseball,” Lakamp says. “When these kids come out to our baseball fields, they are baseball players and have no disability.”
 
Voting ends June 15 at 11:59 p.m. Winning photographers receive cash prizes and a chance to be featured in a public exhibition during All-Star Weekend in July.

Do Good:

• Enter your photos in the "Fields of Dreams" contest.

• View entries and vote for your favorite photo prior to 11:59 p.m. June 15.

• Support Butler County Challenger Baseball by donating.
 

ArtWorks restarts Saturday Mural Tours of OTR and downtown public art


ArtWorks, the local nonprofit that employs young people to create public art, is again offering its Saturday Mural Tours program.
 
Each 90-minute walk — one through Over-the-Rhine, one through Downtown — is approximately a mile long and features 7-10 murals created by ArtWorks artists. The OTR tour begins at Coffee Emporium at the corner of Walnut Street and Central Parkway at noon, while the Downtown walk begins on Fountain Square at 2 p.m. Two guides lead each tour.
 
The Spirit of OTR tour features “Mr. Tarbell Tips His Hat,” “The Golden Muse” and “Strongman Henry Holtgrewe” among other murals. The Cincinnati Genius tour includes three works from the Cincinnati Master Artist series, including Charley Harper’s “Homecoming (Bluebirds),” Tom Wesselman’s Still Life #60” and John Ruthven’s “Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon.”
 
The tours help raise money for ArtWorks, which lured the then 88-year-old Ruthven to a scaffold at Eighth and Vine streets in the summer of 2013 to work with 15 apprentice artists on a massive rendition of his original “Martha” that covers the entire side of a downtown building.
 
The tours run every Saturday through November and are $20 for adults and free for children under 12. Tickets must be purchased in advance.

Do Good:

• Join one of the mural tours by purchasing tickets in advance through the ArtWorks website, which also offers discounts and coupons to A Tavola in OTR’s Gateway Quarter following the tours.

• Find out about all 90 of ArtWorks’ public murals, located in numerous neighborhoods on both sides of the river, and do your own self-guided tour.

Support ArtWorks’ mission to employ, engage, create and transform the Greater Cincinnati region.
 

"Walking Cincinnati" launches Saturday in OTR and Covington


Walking Cincinnati, the book that takes readers on a journey through historical, architectural, culinary and socially relevant highlights in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, will be unveiled at two launch parties Saturday, April 11.
 
Written by Danny Korman, owner of Park + Vine in Over-the-Rhine, and Katie Meyer, manager of Renaissance Covington, the launch party will start at noon at Park + Vine in Over-the-Rhine with the authors signing copies. At 2 p.m., Korman and Meyer will put the spirit of the book into action by leading a hike to Roebling Point Books & Coffee in Covington, which is also the home of Keen Communications, publisher of the book. The festivities will continue there until 5 p.m.
 
Korman and Meyer worked for more than two years on the project, which is subtitled “An Insider’s Guide to 32 Historic Neighborhoods, Stunning Riverfront Quarters and Hidden Treasures in the Queen City.” The authors are experienced urban explorers who have a passion for those hidden treasures that lie just beneath the surface for people who might not get out of their cars often as they travel through the area.
 
Organized by neighborhoods, Walking Cincinnati travels from Sayler Park on the west side to Hyde Park on the east and beyond in addition to Newport, Covington and other areas south of the Ohio River.
 
“This is my first book, I’m super excited about it and I’m completely honored by it,” says Korman, who doesn’t own a car and travels the four miles from his home in Evanston to his store every day on foot or bicycle.
 
Walking Cincinnati arrives as more and more people are moving into the urban core of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The book shares observations and stories collected by Korman and Meyer, but the authors would say its true purpose is to encourage people to find their own paths through the neighborhoods that generations have walked before them.

Do Good:

• Attend the launch parties Saturday, April 11: 12 noon at Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine; and 3 p.m. at Roebling Point Books & Coffee, 306 Greenup St., Covington.

• Support local writers and local publishers by purchasing Walking Cincinnati.

• Walk your own neighborhood, then branch out and try walking everywhere.
 

Help OTR Brewery District put Cincy on map with heritage trail


Nonprofits, small business owners and residents all came together two weekends ago in Over-the-Rhine to make Bockfest successful in its 23rd year, but there's more to look forward to given what Cincinnati’s Brewery District has in store.
 
“Bockfest is a celebration of beer, the coming of spring, but also a celebration of the neighborhood and a particular place,” says Steven Hampton, executive director of the Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation. “This neighborhood is the key.”
 
And it’s that notion of “neighborhood” and a sense of place that's driving the nonprofit’s mission to make the Brewery District “the place to live, work and play.” Through festivals like Bockfest, the OTR Biergarten, historic brewery tours and most recently its work to create the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail, the Brewery District is making strides in putting historic OTR on the map.
 
“We get a lot of folks that say, ‘I’m not a museum folk or wouldn’t normally come down here, but beer history, I’m all aboard,’” Hampton says. “We joke we can tell anybody’s story in history and intertwine it with beer. There are so many facts about how much we drank and produced, but how it was intertwined with stories of how this city grew, that’s the fun thing.”
 
To share those stories and to create interactive ways for neighbors and visitors to grow the city further, the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail — a project Hampton says will come completely to fruition in the next four years or so — will showcase Cincinnati’s unique history while revitalizing the northern Over-the-Rhine district and generating tourism.
 
“It really has the potential to be a world class neighborhood,” Hampton says. “Boston is known worldwide for the Freedom Trail, Kentucky for the Bourbon Trail. Cincinnati’s going to be known for this.

“Most cities would kill to have this amazing collection of history and architecture, all these different cultural assets in one amazing, walkable neighborhood. So we’re going to capitalize on and focus on what we have — these amazing assets left to us — and continue to build those and share them with folks locally and the world to make this a better place.”

Do Good 

Learn about the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail.

• Take a tour and experience Cincinnati's brewing history for yourself. 

• Help build the trail by donating
 

Cornerstone provides OTR residents with housing plus opportunity


Cornerstone Corporation for Shared Equity might provide individuals with safe, affordable housing, but it also gives them the opportunity to earn money back after five and 10 years of responsible renting.
 
“We’re really a social enterprise,” says Rob Sheil, the nonprofit’s executive director. “We’re trying to provide opportunity for folks to lift themselves out of poverty.”
 
According to Sheil, the organization provides “a hand up” rather than a handout. To earn renter equity, individuals must attend monthly meetings — similar to association meetings hosted for condominium residents — pay rent on time and complete a weekly task by participating in property maintenance and upkeep.
 
“Participation in the weekly task not only helps lower operating costs, which is how you earn the renters’ equity, but also gives you a sense of ownership you can’t get anywhere else,” Sheil says.
 
After five years, residents have the opportunity to earn $4,100. After 10 years, they can early up to $10,000.
 
Sheil says many of the residents use the money to pay for things like medical expenses, education or tuition, camps for children or grandchildren and even as a downpayment on a home.
 
“One of our former resident board members who had been with us more than 10 years recently moved with her husband into Price Hill, and they purchased a home,” Sheil says. “And while we miss her day-to-day leadership and her presence as a resident board member, it’s just fabulous to have someone with that success when, by all rights, no one would have really predicted that 10 years ago.”
 
For Sheil, it’s all about “the American dream,” though his vision differs from the typical own-a-home mentality.
 
“As a real estate professional for more than 20 years, I love the idea of — in certain situations — people owning their own home,” he says. “But I think the American dream is having a solid roof over your head and the ability to build wealth over time by doing the right things and by being invested in your neighborhood, your community, your school system, perhaps a worship or faith group or a garden club.
 
“You commit to the people around you in the neighborhood that you come in contact with every day, so to me the American dream is a whole lot more than that picket fence and the house behind it.” 

Do Good: 

•    Support Cornerstone Corporation for Shared Equity by donating.

•    The organization will host its first-ever fundraising event in May. Contact Rob Sheil for more information.

•    Change your idea of what's possible for individuals who appear to have limited means.
 

DAAP students lead hands-on effort to fix vacant lots


Students from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning have spent the past two years working with the City of Cincinnati, Keep Cincinnati Beautiful and Building Value to propose sustainable ideas to neighborhoods about what can be done with vacant lots.
 
“It’s a major land use issue, it’s a planning issue, it’s an economic issue, it’s a social issue, it’s a cultural issue,” says Virginia Russell, facilitator of the Vacant Lots: Occupied project at DAAP.
 
Keep Cincinnati Beautiful approached Russell, director of DAAP's horticulture program, to come up with a plant-based response as opposed to “turf and mowing.”
 
So Russell recruited Ryan Geismar, adjunct professor and landscape architect with Human Nature Inc., to get students together for a charrette — an intensive class that met for an entire weekend — and periodically reconvened throughout the course to meet with community stakeholders to discuss ideas.
 
“It was an academic way to get students of architecture, planning and horticulture together to imagine what those lots could be,” Russell says. “Because they can’t all be community gardens, they can’t all be pop up micro pubs, they can’t all be this one cool thing.”
 
In the first iteration of the class, DAAP students created the pattern book Vacant Lots: Occupied, which is meant to serve as a resource for neighborhoods when determining what they can or should do with their newly deconstructed properties.
 
“Keep Cincinnati Beautiful is working with citizens groups to say, ‘Here’s the pattern book. This is what we recommend that you do,’” Russell says. “So you’re thinking about doing a community garden? Here are some things you need to think about before you do that move. You want to do a pop up cinema? Here are the patterns you need to view.”
 
The project is a win-win for all parties involved, and the students are certainly benefitting. The horticulture capstone class received 2014 Honor Awards — the highest honors — for their work from both the Ohio Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects and the Cincinnati Design Awards.
 
“Any time the students get to work directly with the people who benefit from their work, it’s all good,” Russell says. “The students really enjoy the work, and we had two students who were born and raised in Price Hill [the neighborhood served in this fall’s capstone course], so that was really helpful. But we’ve had students from all over the world working on these projects — three students from France in the fall class — and they just had this image of what they see on the news, the bombed out neighborhoods like Detroit and things like that, so they learned a lot about the truth of the vacant lot problem.” 

Do Good:

•    Support the work Keep Cincinnati Beautiful does by donating.

•    Do your part in keeping Cincinnati beautiful by volunteering.

•    Connect with Keep Cincinnati Beautiful on Facebook.
 

Photos at Skirball reveal history, transition of Cincinnati's West End

Sixty black-and-white photographs documenting the architecture, history and human experience of Cincinnati’s West End in the early-mid 20th century, are on display at Skirball Museum.
 
George Rosenthal, Daniel Ransohoff and Ben Rosen: Documenting Cincinnati’s Neighborhoods, which is part of FotoFocus, opened late last month, though photos remain on exhibit through December 21. And this Wednesday, community members are invited to a panel discussion with historians, scholars and community partners who are knowledgeable about the West End.
 
“The panel provides an opportunity to engage with people who have studied the West End, lived in the West End, written about the West End,” says Abby Schwartz, director of Skirball Museum and curator of the exhibition. “We hope to engage with these experts about the history of the neighborhood and the lessons we can learn from its demise, as well as have the opportunity to hear from those who knew the photographers whose works are in the exhibition.”
 
According to Schwartz, the photos on display tell a story about the “plight of urban neighborhoods” during times of transition.
 
“In the case of the West End, what was promised as urban revitalization really turned out to be a terrible chapter in the city's history, resulting in the destruction of an entire neighborhood and displacement of its inhabitants,” Schwartz says. “I think it presents an opportunity to think about what could have been done differently, and provides lessons going forward.” 

Do Good:

•    Attend Wednesday's panel discussion at 7 p.m. 

•    Check out the exhibition at Skirball Museum. Hours are here.

•    Check out other exhibitions that are part of FotoFocus Biennial 2014.
 

United Way collaborates to move social innovation forward

United Way of Greater Cincinnati, in collaboration with the Greater Cincinnati Foundation and Design Impact, is wrapping up its selection process for a seven-month “design thinking” project.
 
“We think design thinking is a really compelling way to support innovative approaches, because it encourages people to look at how they’re currently doing work and then find opportunities to do some things differently,” says Mike Baker, director at the UWGC.
 
Five local organizations—or design teams—will begin the process this month and work with participating organizations to design an approach that supports a two-generational strategy of finding ways to move families beyond poverty.
 
“We’ll pilot it to look and see what’s working, and then at the end of the year, kind of synthesize that into some knowledge we can share in the community,” Baker says.
 
For Ramsey Ford, design director at Design Impact, innovative approaches that come as a result of design thinking, are “good ways to solve existing problems and create social change.”
 
The design thinking approach to problem solving is commonly used in the private sector, but now it’s being applied to the social sector, and it’s encouraging all parties to think differently about how to unearth interesting solutions more quickly, says Shiloh Turner, vice president for community investments at the GCF.
 
“I think a lot of times, people think the grants we make are the most important things we do, and I’m not denying those are important,” Turner says. “But I think sometimes the nonmonetary assistance such as this effort translates into potentially being more powerful than a programmatic grant that we would also provide.”

Do Good:

•    Learn about about UWGC's Bold Goals for Our Region.

•    Get involved with Design Thinking Cincy.

•    Be a part of change by volunteering.



 

ESCC celebrates National Volunteer Week

In recognition of National Volunteer Week, which was celebrated last month, Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati honored four of its top volunteers.
 
ESCC volunteers provide consulting services to area nonprofits by applying their skills and knowledge from the workforce to the not-for-profit sector.
 
For Bob Conklin, Procter & Gamble retiree and one of the four individuals recognized, volunteering with ESCC is a meaningful endeavor because it gives him a chance to continue to apply his knowledge in an environment that’s not money-driven.
 
“Many of the nonprofits are small organizations, staffed by people who have a tremendous passion for whatever service they’re doing,” Conklin says.
 
Conklin has assisted a variety of nonprofits, but his favorite task was supervising construction of the new Scout Achievement Center, he says.
 
“The Boy Scouts had no one who had project-management, design and construction experience, so I was able to help interpret for the architect what was needed and help on a day-to-day basis with decision-making,” Conklin says.
 
“No matter what’s designed, there are always things that are encountered in construction where plans have to be changed, and so I was able to bring the technical and project manager expertise to that to give them guidance.”
 
Conklin spent about 20 hours a week volunteering with the Boy Scouts’ project, which he says was at times challenging, but incredibly rewarding.
 
“There is such an overwhelming need with nonprofits, but they typically don’t have time or the structure behind them to work on developing things like, ‘How do I manage an organization? ‘How do I recruit people? How do I set up a financial system?’” Conklin says. “So what we can do is to provide some advice, assistance and training that really helps them be more effective at delivering their mission.” 

Do Good:

•    Contact ESCC if you're a nonprofit with a request for assistance

•    Volunteer with ESCC.

•    Support ESCC by donating.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

Annual OTR 5k sees parallel growth with community

When the Over-the-Rhine Chamber of Commerce hosted its first 5k as a fundraiser in 2007, the organization raised about $9,000 dollars, and event organizers say the party was over when the single keg was finished.
 
Last year, the event brought in $66,000 dollars—just one of the dramatic changes that has occurred since the 5k’s inception.
 
“I think it’s been exciting to see the changes since 2007, and I think what’s happening in OTR is probably one of the best revitalization stories that’s happened in the country in 10 years—that’s probably not an exaggeration,” says Bobby Maly, board chair.
 
For Maly, the race’s transformation parallels that of the community of OTR. “with the growth, the diversity and the vibrancy of it.”

When the 5k first happened, Maly says 12th and Vine streets—the first blocks where OTR redevelopment began—were just getting started. And Washington Park, where the event now hosts 5,000 people for an after-run celebration, had not yet undergone expansion.
 
Community members and individuals who perhaps have never visited OTR before now join together, as small businesses and local vendors team up with artists, musicians and anyone with a passion for togetherness to celebrate a community whose social and economic vibrancy continues to grow.
 
“It’s cool for people who have never been to OTR, and it continues to be a great event for people to come and say, ‘What’s this all about?’ because they can come down with thousands of people, walk around and see the buildings, be in the middle of Washington Park and experience OTR with one of our best days in the neighborhood,” Maly says.
 
“So, I think it’s both a great opportunity for those who call OTR their own community to enjoy it, but it’s also a great chance for people who have never been.” 

Do Good: 

•    Register for the 5k, and attend the celebration May 17.

•    Sign up to volunteer at the 5k.

•    Like OTR Chamber of Commerce on Facebook.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

NKU students use grafitti as vehicle to fund nonprofits

For students like Jason Hulett, community-building events are invaluable when it comes to presenting ideas, raising awareness, sparking conversations and making a difference in the lives of others.
 
GraffitiFest, which took place last week, constitutes one of those events, says Hulett, a Northern Kentucky University senior entrepreneurship major and GraffitiFest lead organizer.
 
“I just thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be cool if we could have graffiti on campus? And then, wouldn’t it be cool if we could provide graffiti to people on campus? And if we’re going to hold an event, we might as well do it for a good cause,'” Hulett says.
 
So likeminded students from an event planning class came together to bring graffiti artists, local musicians, vendors, teams of entrepreneurship students and the general public together to raise awareness and funds for nonprofits who provide relief to others.
 
“We wanted to show graffiti in a positive light because it gets a bad rep with vandalism and all that. But if we were going to raise money, we wanted to do it for social good and not just personal gain,” Hulett says. “So it goes toward artists and nonprofits—no CEOs—the university makes no money off this. So that was important to us.”
 
Proceeds from the event, in which graffiti artists’ work from the day was auctioned off, totaled about $1,500 dollars, which will be split down the middle to benefit artists as well as charities.
 
“It was a celebration of an artform that we think is underutilized and underappreciated, and it created an opportunity for something different to shine in a light that’s more positive,” Hulett says. “Some of the causes of the nonprofit—especially Revive the Heart with human trafficking—people don’t want to hear about that. But if you present it in that kind of format, you get a better response because people are more willing to participate.” 

Do Good:

• Like GraffitiFest's Facebook page, as the students plan to make this at least an annual event. 

• Follow GraffitiFest on Twitter.

• Support local artists and nonprofits you're passionate about.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 


Local small biz owners launch app to increase charitable giving

When Daniel Graff, Giveunity co-founder, heard his friend’s—and now, business partner’s—story about how he tried to donate money to a homeless shelter, but couldn’t, he knew something needed to change.
 
“He had seen something downtown that triggered the idea of donating to this shelter,” Graff says.
 
“So by the time he got home and found the shelter on his laptop and he went to their little online website donation page, and it wouldn’t take some of his data, and he had to re-fill out the form, and as he tells it, the dog started barking, had to go out, and the wife came home—long story short—after an hour of trying to give them money and couldn’t, he just gave up.”
 
So Graff and his wife, designers and owners of Graff Designs Inc., and their two friends—both of MOBA Interactive—had dinner and put their heads together to come up with an idea for a smartphone app that allows individuals to donate to a local nonprofit in just three easy clicks.

With the Graffs' design skills and MOBA Interactive partners' technological expertise, the four were able to combine their knowledge to create and launch the app this past February. 

It's completely free for everyone to use, as the four app developers funded the project completely on their own, and within its first 50 days in the app store, it received 1,800 profile views. According to Graff, the top donation so far is $500 dollars, with the average contribution being about $38 dollars; and the money reaches the nonprofit instantly.

"What's been really fun for us is that we've had nonprofits showing up on the app that we didn't even know existed, and that's kind of the idea of the 'explore' section, but I've had my business now for 18 years and just wanted to do something to give back to Cincinnati," Graff says. "We don't always have the funds to donate to nonprofits, but we certainly have the time and talent to build this and give back."
 

Do Good:

Download the free app today.

• Like Giveunity's Facebook page, and tell your friends.

• If you're a nonprofit, register for free and create your profile and $GiveTag.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 
51 Architecture + Design Articles | Page: | Show All
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