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High school musicians will work with the CSO and Pops to put on a concert in April


Local high school students are practicing for what's bound to be a memorable performance.

On April 11, a combined orchestra — made up of students from Indian Hill, Mariemont and Madeira high schools — will perform under the conductorship of Cincinnati Pops’ John Morris Russell.
 
Along the way, they’ll receive coaching from Russell, as well as from the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and Pops assistant conductors and musicians.
 
The concert is part of a longstanding and collaborative effort that is a key aspect of the CSO’s education and community engagement initiative.
 
“I’m thrilled we are continuing this collaboration for the fifth year in a row,” Russell says. “It’s a joy to see how this program has developed as well as the intense dedication of the student musicians and faculty members in rehearsing and performing together on this very special event.”

The opportunity to perform under the guidance of a top-notch and respected conductor fosters talent and discipline, says Ahmad Mayes, the CSO’s director of education and community engagement. “As the leading music organization in the region, the Orchestra embraces instrumental instruction as a tool for learning and change.”

And when students are highly engaged and inspired, they are capable of producing content that allows them to further recognize their creativity and strength.

“One of the most gratifying endeavors as Pops conductor  is working in the community with music educators, developing self-discipline, creativity, teamwork and love of beauty in our students," Russell says.

Do Good: 

•    Mark your calendars for April 11. Students will perform at 7 p.m. at Indian Hill High School. 

•    Explore ways you can create musical opportunities for students within the classroom.

•    Know a talented young musician? Check out the various opportunities for growth offered by the CSO and Pops.
 

Annual Securing the Future Conference to challenge and inspire nonprofits


It’s time to end the “Nonprofit Hunger Games,” says Vu Le, author of the blog Nonprofit With Balls
 
Le will serve as keynote speaker at this year’s Securing the Future conference — an annual event aimed at helping nonprofits build their resources and skills — which will be held on Feb. 23 at Xavier University.
 
This year’s topic — because nonprofits have a lot of balls to juggle — is Nonprofit Juggling: People, Perspectives & Priorities. 
 
“This is a one-of-a-kind event in our region, and it is something the nonprofit community looks forward to each year,” says Jenny Berg, executive director of the Leadership Council for Nonprofits, which provides programming for other nonprofits, enabling them to build capacity and gain a network of support. “It brings together nonprofit leaders, funders, board members and businesses to network, learn, challenge, inspire and support the nonprofit community.”
 
This will be the first year the Leadership Council has taken ownership of the annual conference, which began in 2002 as a project of Class XXIV of Leadership Cincinnati, and Berg is excited to take part in hosting it as the lineup of events is a “don’t miss” opportunity, she says.
 
In addition to a keynote address from Le, local leaders will host breakout sessions focused on effectively utilizing individuals connected to nonprofits, whether they be internally or externally involved, ensuring a variety of perspectives are heard and considered, and staying true to one’s mission in spite of pressures that may arise.
 
“It is important to the success of our region to invest in and build up a strong foundation of nonprofits, which in turn makes our community stronger, and more attractive to great talent, development and culture,” Berg says. “If you want to be challenged, encouraged, uplifted, uncomfortable, entertained and to grow, then this is the conference for you. You’ll walk away wondering, ‘What’s one thing that’s too important for me/my organization to juggle — that one thing I simply can’t afford to drop — and how will I ensure it doesn’t get juggled?’”

Do Good: 

•    View the schedule for Securing the Future to learn more.

•    Register by Feb. 17 if you would like to attend Securing the Future.

•    Follow the Leadership Council on Twitter.
 

Female philanthropists to award nonprofits with more than $400k in 2017


For the third straight year, Impact 100 has sustained its member base and will again be able to offer four local nonprofits grants of $101,000 each.
 
With more than 400 women ranging in age from their early 20s to their 80s, the all-female philanthropic group makes it a point to individually pledge $1,000 per year. This allows the organization to pool their money and provide nonprofits with the funds and capacity needed to transform lives. The group will recognize grant recipients at its annual awards celebration on Sept. 12.
 
A record number of applications were submitted this year from five focus areas: culture, education, environment, family and health and wellness.
 
Final applications from those receiving letters of intent are due March 24, at which point they will be further reviewed.
 
According to Impact 100 president Donna Broderick, it’s both exciting and encouraging to see women step up for the good of the community and empower themselves by voting on the nonprofit they feel most passionate about.
 
“It is a testament to the humanitarian spirit of the women of our region that Impact 100 has gone from offering one grant in 2002, to offering four $101,000 grants in just 15 years,” Broderick says. “More importantly, these dollars have improved, and in some cases, changed the lives of many of those served by the organizations that have received our grants.”

Do Good: 

•    Learn more about previous grantees to see how they're transforming lives and communities.

•    If you're a female interested in philanthropy, join Impact 100. New members are always welcome.

•    Connect with Impact 100 on Facebook.
 

La Soupe on a mission to double its reach in 2017


Looking for a special way to enjoy Valentine’s Day?
 
Whether it’s with that special someone, a family member or a friend, La Soupe is offering a way for you to celebrate by “paying with your heart.”
 
The nonprofit, which rescues nutritious ingredients from otherwise wasted food and then prepares dishes in an effort to combat food insecurity, will serve its soups at Union Hall on Feb. 14.
 
The goal: to immerse itself within the startup movement while aiming to double its expansion efforts.
 
“Cincinnati is ranked the no. 2 city in the U.S. for childhood poverty; at the same time, 40 percent of all food in the U.S. is wasted,” says Jessica Kerr, La Soupe’s director of development. “La Soupe’s mission is to bridge this gap.”
 
According to Kerr, the nonprofit has rescued more than 125,000 pounds of food and donated 95,000 servings of soup to people in need.
 
“That equates to saving 270 cubic yards of landfill,” Kerr says. “However, we are at our capacity with our 900-square-foot building. We are fundraising to expand our location so we can double the amount of food we rescue and soups we share.”
 
Next week’s Union Hall event will feature #StartUpCincy member companies, most of which are physical in nature. But for Kerr, the hope is this: “That people will stop by to taste some soups, see what Union Hall has to offer and shop around for any last-minute Valentine’s Day gifts.”
 
The event will feature soups from its Bucket Brigade chefs, including Orchids at Palm Court’s Todd Kelly, Salazar’s Andy Hiner and Maribelle’s Mike Florea. Soup will be free of charge, though donations will be accepted to help the nonprofit reach more individuals in the days to come.
 
“We are so excited to be welcomed into the #StartUpCincy community,” Kerr says. “Cincinnati’s startup scene revolves around innovation of all kinds (not just tech), and our goal is to show the city — and the country — that increasing collaboration among tech and social companies can solve major problems through innovation. We are dedicated to utilizing technology to bridge Cincinnati's food waste and food insecurity gap.”

Do Good: 

•    Check out La Soupe at its Feb. 14 event, or via its Soupe Mobile at Mariemont Square on Feb. 28. 

•    Interested in La Soupe and its Soupe Mobile? Follow the schedule on Facebook and Twitter at @SoupePassionne. 

•    Support La Soupe by donating today.
 

Calling nonprofits: Studio C incubator accepting apps now through Feb. 20


For nonprofits interested in better serving others via creative means — specifically for those aiming to address issues of poverty from a family-centered approach — Studio C is accepting applications now through Feb. 20.
 
Studio C is a 12-week project incubator for nonprofits and community organizations that are looking to “spend more time than usual getting acquainted with a problem, studying it and checking it with the community,” says Design Impact’s Sarah Corlett, who is a co-facilitator for the program.

Check out the takeaways of some of Studio C's past participants below:


 
For Mike Baker, United Way’s director of community impact, it’s a way for organizations to pair up with others who approach problems differently and ultimately find a way to move their ideas forward.
 
“The impact we are most proud of is when we see organizations shift their culture to be more human-centered,” Baker says. “They change from approaching opportunities with a mindset of ‘What do we know?’ to a mindset of ‘What can we learn?’”
 
United Way, which is funding the initiative, partnered with Design Impact — they're providing the curriculum for the 12 weeks of discussions, workshops, coaching and hands-on activities.
 
“We believe there are unproven — but potentially transformational ideas — and we have a responsibility for supporting the creation, development and implementation of these ideas,” Baker says. “We are particularly interested in the role that human-centered design can play in helping nonprofits and community organizations more intimately understand the aspirations, strengths and challenges of the people they are trying to help.”

Do Good: 

•    Are you a nonprofit interested in a family-centered approach to alleviating poverty? If so, apply for Studio C's spring session by Feb. 20. 

•    Curious about the Studio C curriculum? Learn more here.

•    Questions or comments? Don't hesitate to reach out to share your ideas or concerns. Contact those who are part of Studio C today. 
 

Local STEM Bicycle Clubs gain momentum in fourth year


Students at 12 local schools will receive 160 bicycles this week, which they will learn to disassemble and reengineer — eventually ending up with a finished product and a new mode of transportation.
 
The project — initially debuted at Woodward Career Technical High School — is now in its fourth year. It has grown significantly over the years, and is a huge success, says Mary Adams, project manager of the Greater Cincinnati STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Collaborative — the nonprofit organizer of GCSC Bicycle Clubs.
 
“Twelve clubs means that in year four, we are reaching more kids, getting them engaged, making learning fun and creating an impact,” Adams says. "That impact, repeated in data and heard last week during the professional development training for club leaders, is that STEM Bicycle Clubs give kids experiences that build confidence and get them to think about career possibilities they didn’t even know exist.”
According to Woodward’s Resource Coordinator Casey Fisher, students tend to have “tunnel vision,” thinking the only STEM careers out there are in the medical fields — doctors and nurses.
 
Through her three years of experience as a Bicycle Club project leader, Fisher has witnessed first-hand the direct impact mentors, including those from GE, have had on students’ lives.
 
“[Students were] shy, not as social, reserved and intimidated at first,” Fisher says. “By midway, these kids were engaged, asking questions without prompts, learning how to be a family and relating to science, technology, engineering and math.” 

Do Good: 

•    Learn more about the GCSC by connecting with the nonprofit on Facebook.

•    With more support, the GCSC can continue to expand its Bicycle Clubs, reaching even more students. Support the GCSC today.

•    The GCSC is accepting applications for its Summer of STEM 2017 mini-grants through Feb. 17. Learn more, and apply today.
 

DePaul Cristo Rey's work study program allows students to excel at school and work


This year is already off to a great start for DePaul Cristo Rey High School, as its students are showing continued academic success while building connections within the local community.

For the third year, DePaul Cristo Rey seniors have achieved a 100 percent college acceptance rate. Meanwhile, the school’s Corporate Work Study Program, which allows students to not only gain soft skills, experience and knowledge via a workplace setting and save their families money by earning funds that are applied to tuition — making private school affordable and accessible — is expanding.

Eight additional companies, including well recognized corporate entities and a minority-owned firm, recently joined the CWSP.

“Adding new partners to the CWSP allows DPCR to provide a private, college-prep, quality education to even more students in our community whose families can’t afford other private schools,” says Margee Garbsch, the school’s director of communications and marketing. “Because the CWSP is a fundamental part of a Cristo Rey education, we must have a job for every student, and since our enrollment continues to increase each year, we must add partners as we add students.”

According to Garbsch, adding more partners also adds a larger knowledge base for students with varying interests.

“New sectors like manufacturing, for example, as well as growth in sectors such as healthcare and banking continue to expand our students’ vision of what their future opportunities, careers and goals can be,” Garbsch says. “It also exposes them to professional role models, mentors and opportunities.”

It’s initiatives like the CWSP that play a role in DePaul Cristo Rey's students’ success and drive to continue education post-high school, evidenced by the placement of the school’s alumni from previous years.

“Most graduates of the classes of 2015 and 2016 are enrolled in colleges — some as close as the University of Cincinnati — some further away,” Garbsch says. “The list includes The Ohio State University, Loyola in Chicago and Franklin & Marshall College in Pennsylvania.”

Do Good: 

•    Is your company interested in supporting DePaul Cristo Rey students? Become a corporate partner.

•    Give to DePaul Cristo Rey.

•    Support DePaul Cristo Rey students by volunteering.
 

Pops to host NYC jazz band for NYE speakeasy-themed concert


If you’ve yet to formulate plans for New Year's Eve, have no fear; the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra has you covered.  
 
New York City-based jazz band, The Hot Sardines, will join the Pops at its Dec. 31 speakeasy-themed concert, which will feature old-time favorites from the likes of George Gershwin and Duke Ellington, in addition to some of The Hot Sardines’ originals.
 
“Sometimes life requires a party,” said Evan Palazzo, The Hot Sardines’ bandleader. “But one that conveys a rich emotional experience which people today sometimes need permission to feel, otherwise known as fun.”
 
And that’s what the two musical groups plan to bring to the Taft Theatre — perhaps the perfect setting for a speakeasy-themed event where patrons are encouraged to come dressed with their beads and boas.
 
“We love high-energy music from the first half of the 20th century,” Palazzo said. “Our mission is to show its relevance and power as we usher in 2017.”
 
Tickets are still available for the special New Year’s Eve performance, which begins at 8 p.m. 

Do Good: 

•    Purchase your concert tickets before they sell out. 

•    Check out a couple of The Hot Sardines' latest hits here and here

•    Connect with the Pops on Facebook.
 

Best Buy awards GCSC grant to continue operations of local 3D printer clubs

Two 3-d printer clubs received a $5,000 grant from Best Buy to fund students who are eager to design, create, and problem-solve.
 
Corryville Catholic Elementary School students like Aleia Samuels from Avondale, for example, will gain exposure to technology.
 
“I’d never done anything like this before,” Samuels said. “Now I see so many possibilities and how to use technology in different ways.” Samuels’ favorite creation to-date is an egg-rabbit-chicken keychain.
 
According to Brian Stevens of Best Buy, the Best Buy Community Grant initiative provides teens with places and opportunities to develop 21st century technology skills to inspire their educational and career choices.  
 
“In a nutshell, the clubs are teens and technology,” Stevens said. “The opportunity for students to design, create, see problems and fix them is tremendous. They are getting the best STEM learning from the Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative (GCSC).”
 
The GCSC, a nonprofit whose vision is to create a “technologically rich, vibrant community with the most talented STEM workforce in the country that is representative of the region’s population,” applied for the grant and continues to find ways to fund the clubs — currently there's more interest than funding available.  Twenty-eight schools have applied, and three existing clubs are still waiting to see if funding will allow for another year of the club’s implementation.
 
“It’s an awesome opportunity to support something really cool that’s good for kids and our community,” said Mary Adams, GCSC Project Manager. “You can be part of making that happen for elementary and middle schools.” 

Do Good: 

•    Help fund the work of the GCSC. For example, $700 funds one 3-d printer. 

•    Support the GCSC in other ways — perhaps through volunteering.

•    Learn more about Best Buy Community Grants, including how to apply for one in the future.

 

Local creatives raise nearly $10K for Make-A-Wish


Halloween has come and gone, but the impacts of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) Cincinnati chapter’s latest fundraiser are long lasting.  The group hosted GUTS: Creatives Carving for Kids at Washington Park last month and raised nearly $10,000 for Make-A-Wish Southern Ohio. The “pipeline of eligible children” continues to grow with the proximity of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.
 
“We raised more than enough for one wish,” said Jay Shifman of Make-A-Wish Shifman said noting that they work to grant the wish of every child facing a life threatening illness in our community.
 
AIGA to surpassed fundraising goal of $8,000 (the average cost of one wish) by $1,200.
 
The winning Team LPK carved “Haunted OTR"  four pumpkins, side-by-side, depicting the local streetscape.  
 
“GUTS is a part of AIGA Cincinnati’s larger ‘Design for Good’ initiative,” said Phil Rowland, architect and AIGA member. “We believe design can make a difference in our community.”

Do Good: 

•    It's not too late to donate. Contribute here.

•    Sign up to be a sponsor for next year's GUTS. It's never too early.

•    There are many ways to help grant wishes. Learn about them here.
 

Library Foundation announces newest Writer-in-Residence


The Library Foundation has a new Writer-in-Residence, local high school English teacher Kurt Dinan.
 
Dinan teaches 10th grade English and creative writing at William Mason High School. He also serves as the advisor for the school’s yearbook.
 
Dinan will make his first appearance in his new position at 7 p.m. on Nov. 15 in the Main Library’s Popular Library Lounge, where he’ll read from his first published young adult novel, Don’t Get Caught. The reading will be followed by a question-and-answer session.
 
“I started writing at 30, and I think when you find your passion, you want to be able to share it with people,” Dinan said.
 
He’ll have the opportunity to do just that, as he’ll share his talents through a variety of modes and mediums from now through next September.
 
Conducting writers’ workshops, hosting podcasts and blogging are just a few items on his agenda.

“I’m just really thrilled,” Dinan said. "I’ll have the opportunity to help other writers in the community and support the Library.”

Do Good: 

•    Support The Library Foundation in its quest to better the community through literacy, activity, enrichment and other support services.

•    Keep up with the Library and its upcoming events on Facebook.

•    Mark your calendar for Dinan's first appearance as Writer-in-Residence, which is at 7 p.m. on Nov. 15.
 

Local employer teams up with Starfire, builds inclusive workplace environment


Catherine Bennett and Craig Ihlendorf have worked closely with one another since September 2015, which is when Ihlendorf started working at Kinetic Vision.

Prior to his work at the engineering consulting firm in Evendale, Ihlendorf was unfulfilled by his job.

“It was okay,” Ihlendorf said. “But I didn't really care about what I did. I didn't get to work on anything that was important to me.”

Now that’s all changed, and the impact can be seen in a variety of capacities. 

On Oct. 18, Kinetic Vision received the 2016 Ohio Employer of the Year Award from the Governor’s Council on People with Disabilities, and Ihlendorf feels valued. The organization was recognized for its inclusive workplace environment for people with disabilities.

“When I go to work, I get to be around other people who like the same things I do,” Ihlendorf said. “When I suggest something, they really listen and encourage me.”

The pairing was made possible by Starfire — a local nonprofit that helps individuals with disabilities discover their talents through relationship building, then places them in communities where they can thrive. Working with one person and their family at a time, Starfire connects people to relationships and uncovers a person's talents and passions so they can thrive in their communities alongside their neighbors.

Kinetic Vision wasn’t concerned with Ihlendorf’s disability. Instead, they saw his passion and ability to work with computers, and as a result, both the company and the individual are seeing positive results.

Do Good: 

•    Want to help Starfire build a more inclusive community? Connect with the nonprofit.

•    Like Starfire on Facebook.

•    Learn more about Kinetic Vision, and connect on LinkedIn.
 

Local artists team up, support Pets in Need


Calling all pet lovers: Pets in Need of Greater Cincinnati will host its third annual fundraiser, Petcasso, on Nov. 19, at The Carnegie Center of Columbia Tusculum.
 
New this year is the “Painted Pets” auction of unique artwork by Mara McCalmont, local artist and creator of the “Peter Max” Painted Pet, and other artists who are donating their work.

“Ninety-nine percent of my work features animals,” said McCalmont. “It’s hard to put my love for animals into words — it’s unconditional — it doesn’t matter if you’ve had a bad day. They don’t care what you look like. They’re like children that never grow up; they just stay your sweet little baby.”
 
The organization, which provides food and low-cost veterinary care for pets in homes of those living at 150 percent below poverty level, currently serves 1,800 households.
 
“I’ve seen first-hand how Pets In Need helps people keep their pets, when it would have otherwise been impossible,” McCalmont said. “Their work is so important because pets are just such a big part of our lives.”
 
The nonprofit’s function stretches far beyond providing food and low-cost veterinary care for board member and volunteer Lexie Stevenson.
 
When one client’s canine companion, Beowulf, was euthanized, her niece requested memories of Beowulf from better times.
 
“She told me later how much it meant to her aunt to have those pictures,” Stevenson said. “At Pets In Need, we provide amazing low-cost veterinary care, but we also provide something intangible: respect, compassion and dignity to people who are often worn down by poverty, illness or age. It means almost as much to me as it does to them to be able to provide a memento of their dear companion.”  

Do Good: 

•    Register now for Petcasso, Nov. 19 from 7-10 p.m., $85, 3738 Eastern Ave., 45226, includes open bar, live entertainment, cocktail buffet.

•    Can't attend Petcasso? Support Pets in Need by donating.

•    Connect with Pets in Need on Facebook.
 

Walnut Hills High School host CSO chamber concert Oct. 18 to benefit refugees


A Walnut Hills High School (WHHS) student-led group is doing its part to educate themselves and others about refugees and their needs, while offering a helping hand and system of support.
 
Students Together Assisting Refugees (STAR), founded in 2015, will host a benefit chamber concert featuring Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) principal musicians Oct. 18.
 
The intimate concert experience will allow STAR, in collaboration with the Junior League of Cincinnati’s project RefugeeConnect, to fund scholarships for student refugees.
 
“We live comfortably in Ohio, far away from most of the international conflict, but there are refugee teens in Cincinnati who struggle with very difficult lives,” said Adam Sella, STAR president and WHHS senior. “We hope to raise enough money from the concert to offer more than one scholarship to Cincinnati Public Schools’ students.”
 
It’s important to Sella and other STAR members to reach out to their fellow student body as well. German Consul General Herbert Quelle, who will attend next week’s concert, will also speak to WHHS students about the German response to the refugee crisis.  It’s just one of many opportunities for both learning and engagement STAR makes possible.
 
“Last year when two Bhutanese youths spoke, the WHHS students were shocked to learn their stories of hardship and asked questions about what it is like to be a refugee,” Sella said. “It is important for everyone to understand the refugee crisis.” 

Do Good: 

•    Support WHHS's STAR in its effort to raise funds for student refugees' education by attending next Tuesday's concert.

•    Even if you can't attend the October 18 event, consider donating to the scholarship fund.

•    Want to do more? Learn more about RefugeeConnect and how you can get involved.
 

Women craft brewers host beer tasting to benefit Women Helping Women


Amelia BEERhart: Celebrating Women in the Craft Beer Industry — the brainchild of Ei8ht Ball Brewing — presents an opportunity to not only honor strong women who brew beer, but also to honor strong women who have survived domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
 
Women Helping Women will receive a portion of the proceeds from the Oct. 14 celebration.
 
“The nonprofit is local, like all of our breweries, and through programs, it gives strength to women who have lost their voice,” said Holli Redmond, who manages Ei8ht Ball Brewing’s taproom in addition to outside sales within its distribution area.
 
A portion of sales from each fli8ht special, in addition to proceeds from a silent art auction in which local females have depicted what it means to be a strong woman will go to the nonprofit, as will diapers — a much needed item, according to Women Helping Women — which are being collected all week, and throughout the night of the event.
 
According to Redmond, the decision to give back came out of the gratefulness women within the craft beer industry possess with regard to their experiences and expertise.
 
“As a female in the craft beer industry, I know there are other women, but our paths don’t always cross, and it can seem like you are surrounded by men,” Redmond said. “We thought it would be a great to invite women interested and working in craft beer to an event that celebrates them and gives them a chance to see that in a sea of male craft beer fans — who are equally as awesome — they are not alone, and that’s a very cool thing.”
 
Ei8ht Ball Brewing has teamed up with more than 8 other local breweries to present the event, which takes place at Ei8ht Ball’s taproom, which houses 42 different beers.
 
“The event is open to everyone, but we wanted to specifically invite women who are interested in, or who work in the industry,” Redmond said. “We have teamed up with other local breweries who not only have female employees, but whose female employees are taking on leadership roles and breaking the mold in the industry. It takes a strong, confident women to be in this field.” 

Do Good: 

•    Male or female, it matters not. Make plans to attend Friday's event from 5-8 p.m. at Ei8ht Ball's taproom.

•    Donate diapers to support Women Helping Women. Each Ei8ht Ball guest donating a pack of diapers will receive a glass of non barrel-aged Ei8ht Ball Beer for the price of a taster. Visit the taproom, and bring your donation by any day this week. 

•    Support Women Helping Women by getting involved
 
513 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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