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Talent : Development News

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Northside art gallery features modernist art by local artists

Object, a new art gallery and retail store in Northside, features modernist pieces from the early 20th century.

Queen City Cookies opens Northside cafe

Peggy Shannon moved to Cincinnati in 2006, and started baking cookies out of her home. She recently opened the Queen City Cookies café in Northside.

Home-based bakery business expanding, opening downtown storefront

Taren Kinebrew started baking with her grandmother when she was a child. Her love of baking has always been a hobby, but in the next few weeks, Kinebrew will be opening a storefront for Sweet Petit Desserts in OTR.

Manifest Gallery expanding, offering more to visitors

Manifest Gallery recently added two new galleries, which is a 66 percent increase. It now has a total of five galleries of art for its visitors to enjoy.

Southern fare is on the menu at Lori Beth's Cafe downtown

Lori Beth Henry, owner of Lori Beth’s Café, began cooking with her grandmother at the age of 6; at 12, she was cooking for events and people at her father’s church.

Ubahn Fest brings electronic and hip-hop music to Metro Transit Center

A-Trak and Mike Posner are headlining Cincinnati’s Ubahn Fest, a hip-hop and electronic dance music festival that will be held in the Metro Transit Center under Second Street downtown.

UC tech accelerator moves to Short Vine

The University of Cincinnati’s Technology Commercialization Accelerator recently opened at its temporary space on Short Vine.

Circus Mojo founder starting first U.S. training center for medical clowning

Paul Miller, a clown and Ringling Bros. alum, is opening a center in Northern Kentucky to certify adults as Circus Wellness Specialists so they can train, educate and help disenfranchised youth, hospitalized people and senior or disabled adults.

Bike-themed coffee and ice pop shop opens in Newport

Carabello Coffee’s Roasting Works and Craft Coffee Bar had its grand opening last Tuesday in Newport. The business is owned by husband-and-wife team Justin and Emily Carabello.

Fortvna chocolate shop coming to Covington

Chef William Poole hopes to have his chocolate shop, Chocolatier Fortvna, up and running next fall in Covington.

Third annual ArtWorks Box Truck Carnival brings free entertainment to MidPoint Music Festival

This weekend, MidPoint Music Festival makes its way back to Cincinnati. Music will fill Cincinnati venues, and the MidPoint Midway will take over 12th Street between Vine and Walnut with free food, music and entertainment.

Work Flow brings yoga to the office, stretching minds and limbs together

Need a stress reliever for you and your employees? Try Work Flow Yoga, the yoga studio that comes to you.
 
Meredith Amann, owner of Work Flow, moved back to her hometown of Cincinnati in December after spending about six years in San Francisco, two years in Philadelphia and three months in New York. In March, she started SpringBoard Cincinnati and finished in May—she launched Work Flow in June.
 
Work Flow classes are based in the tradition of Ashtanga and Hatha yoga, and they focus on safe alignment and maintaining the connection to your breathing. The sessions are non-competitive and are designed for beginners and those with more experience. They are 30-60 minutes and can be held once or twice a week in your workplace.
 
“It’s nice to have flexibility in terms of me coming to them,” says Amann. “It’s one person traveling as opposed to a group of people—and it’s one car on the road instead of 20.”
 
When Amann decided to pursue her yoga training and move to Cincinnati, she thought about a brick-and-mortar studio. But she decided she wanted to offer yoga to those who sat at their desks all day long, and a traveling studio made more sense for that.
 
To date, Amann has taught yoga classes at a handful of small nonprofit companies. If you’re interested in having a class taught at your office, call 513-370-9088 or email Amann at meredith@yogaworkflow.com to schedule a meeting.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Artbeat brings unique artwalk concept to Short Vine

Janet Berberich and Ben Jason Neal of Eye Candy Design wanted to find a way to introduce people to the businesses on Short Vine and artwork at the same time. Their solution was Artbeat on Short Vine, which is held the first Friday of each month.
 
“In the past, Short Vine survived because of the entertainment options it offered, but we want to give people another reason to visit,” says Berberich.
 
The idea is to showcase different pieces of artwork in each venue, and people walk between venues to see the full show. Venues like Bogart’s, the 86 Club, Neihoff Design, 71 Gallery, Beelistic Tattoo and Eye Candy participated in the August Artbeat.
 
“Artbeat is about walking a path,” says Neal. “It implies the beat of music and the heartbeat of the street.”
 
The dead end in front of Kroger gives Short Vine the feel of a neighborhood within a larger town, says Berberich. It has a little bit of everything—entertainment, food and art.
 
“Our goal is to bring in a crowd that’s outside of the area’s demographic, and bring new energy and rejuvenation,” says Neal.
 
The next Artbeat is scheduled for Sept. 6. If you’re interested in participating, contact Neal at 513-371-3782 or ben@creativeeyecandy.com. Display art, live music, the spoken word, performance art and pop-up gallery projects are all encouraged.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Cumin undergoing changes with new chef

Cumin Eclectic Cuisine has seen a number of changes in the past few weeks, including a new chef and menu. Matthew Cranert, who has been the chef for four months at M Wood Fired Oven next door, plans to rely on simple ingredients and good cooking at Cumin.
 
Cranert was born and raised in northern California and spent his summers working in his grandfather’s restaurant in Hawaii. After graduating high school, he attended the Culinary Institute of America and worked in several restaurants in San Francisco. He then returned to Hawaii, and worked under chefs like Sam Choy and Roy Yamaguchi, who taught him to balance French and Asian flavors.
 
Cranert, his wife Stacey and their 7-year-old recently moved to Cincinnati for the opportunity to work in the food scene. Before M, Cranert worked in different restaurants around the city, including Senate. Now Cranert spends his nights running back and forth between the kitchen at M and the kitchen at Cumin.
 
“I want to bring more of what’s going on in other cities to Cincinnati,” he says. “I’ve lived all over and traveled a lot, and want to go head-to-head with New York City and Chicago.”
 
Growing up, Cranert was exposed to Latino and Asian flavors, but was influenced by his mother’s Southern cooking and Hawaiian food as well.
 
“I like to call upon all different flavors,” he says. “There’s a good meld between Asian, Southern and French cooking. People specialize in certain cuisines, but I think you need to learn to throw down with everything, and we’re going to be doing a bit of everything at Cumin.”
 
Cranert wants to make Cumin the best it can be. He has already flipped Cumin’s menu, and plans to change it weekly.

By Caitlin Koenig
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Huit to bring huge flavor to the Cincinnati restaurant scene

Although Huit doesn’t have a physical restaurant location yet, its ribs are already making a big splash with Cincinnati foodies. Owners Jennifer Eng, Tobias Harris and Trang Vo have taken their ribs to food festivals around town—most recently, they were at the Asian Food Festival.
 
“We sold out by about 75 percent the first day,” says Harris. “People really liked our food and kept asking where they could get it.”
 
Eng, Harris and Vo hope to bring a taste of international flavor to Cincinnati, but they don’t want to be thought of as an Asian restaurant or a rib place. They hope to carve their own niche in the restaurant scene.
 
Harris, who has lived in the Cincinnati area for 10 years, wants to expose diners to new experiences at Huit.
 
The menu at Huit—which means “eight” in French—will be small, but will pack a flavorful punch.
 
The three owners of Huit have grown up in families that love to eat, but they all went to college for design. Harris attended architectural school in Asia and began designing hotels. He came to the United States for graduate school—since then, Harris has designed restaurants and even worked for one of the biggest restaurant designers in Chicago.
 
“I’ve traveled all over the world and am always eating,” he says. “In restaurants, I’m all about the taste of it, the soul. If the restaurant doesn’t feel yummy, there’s no point.”
 
At Huit, Trang will be responsible for everything from the design to the build-out; Eng is in charge of creating unique food and drinks; and Harris as the chef is going back to his childhood when he helped his mother and seven aunts cook.
 
By January 2014, look for Huit either downtown or in Covington or Northside—they’re still in negotiations for a space but have several options. Harris hopes to have the restaurant’s grand opening next spring.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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370 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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