| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Pinterest RSS Feed

Over-the-Rhine : Development News

532 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All

Seven finalists announced for Impact 100 grant


Seven area organizations were recently named finalists for the Impact 100 grant. Each year, Impact 100 awards upwards of $100,000 to regional nonprofits for a variety of projects. Since its founding in 2011, Impact 100 has awarded over $3.2 million to the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area.

Four of the grants will be awarded this year, each totaling $101,500. Grant recipients will be named Sept. 13 at Impact 100’s Annual Awards Celebration.
 
Finalists are:
  • The Center for Great Neighborhood's Hellmann Creative Center. Grant money would be used for artist equipment, to display equipment for community-focused gallery space, hiring a coordinator, and a multi-media station that highlights local productions.
  • Chatfield College plans to renovate an underutilized park at the corner of Central Parkway and and Liberty Street into an outdoor learning space. The Central & Liberty Green Space will be used by students doing service projects and in hands-on classroom activities, as well as by the community.
  • Cincinnati Therapeutic Riding & Horsemanship plans to expand Project Mustang if its chosen as a grant recipient. The program helps save wild mustangs; the mustangs are part of the organization's larger goal of helping veterans overcome the affects of PTSD. 
  • Greater Cincinnati Construction Foundation is expanding a program at Woodward Career Technical High School that focuses on the development and implementation of practical, application-based math program in middle schools. The program will help increase the placement of students into the high school program that prepares them for the construction trade.
  • Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission hopes to equip the Lincoln Grant Scholar House with safety amenities and programming. The house provides single mothers who are pursuing post-secondary educations — and their kids — with an affordable housing option and access to a number of programs.
  • St. Francis Seraph Ministries & Center for Respite Care will purchase a commercial stove hood for The St. Anthony Center Dinner Club, which provides breakfast and dinners for the homeless five days per week. The grant would also help fund a new kitchenette for the in-house respite care unit that provides post-hospitalization care and other services for the homeless.
  • Women’s Crisis Center plans to expand its Green Dot Violence Prevention Program to three new high schools in Northern Kentucky.

Update: Status of food trucks to restaurants


Over the past few months, a number of well-known food truck owners have announced that they’re branching out and opening brick-and-mortar restaurants and retail spaces. We decided it was time to give readers an update on the restaurants, as the majority of them are planning to open soon.
 
Dojo Gelato, 1735 Blue Rock St., Northside
Owner Michael Christner is renovating the former J.F. Dairy Corner building into a second location for Dojo. The building is cleaned up, and now construction can begin on the space. Christner plans to move Dojo’s production operations to Northside and will offer an expanded menu that will include gelato as well as traditional ice cream treats.
 
Panino, 1313-1315 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine
Nino Loreto sold his food truck to fund a brick-and-mortar restaurant, which will also serve homemade salami and charcuterie. Panino will feature a casual deli with a walk-up meat counter, plus a restaurant that will offer a small menu of charcuterie plates, crostinis, bruschetta and paninis as well as a small selection of entrees. An opening date hasn’t been set yet because, once build-out on the space is finished, Loreto has to make his meat products, which take a while to cure. Keep tabs on Panino’s Facebook page for updates.
 
Share: Cheesebar, 6105 Ridge Road, Pleasant Ridge
C’est Cheese is one of the city’s most beloved food trucks, maybe because the menu is made up of the ultimate comfort food: grilled cheese. Owner Emily Frank is taking her love of the “cheesy goodness” and opening a retail cheese shop, complete with cheese plates, craft beer and wine to enjoy in-store. There have been a number of setbacks, including a life-threatening injury that Frank experienced earlier this year, but the plans and designs for the space have been submitted and Frank is hoping for a fall opening.
 
Urban Grill on Main, 6623 Main St., Newtown
Randy Reichelderfer and sister-in-law Betsy Eicher are renovating an 1870s farmhouse into a full-service restaurant and coffee shop. The menu will feature customer favorites from the Urban Grill Food Truck, which will continue operating once the restaurant opens. They’re still shooting for a late summer opening in Newtown.
 

Brewing Heritage Trail receives $300,000 in state/local funds, construction to begin early next year


The Over-the-Rhine Brewery District was recently awarded $200,000 from the state and $100,000 from the city to help get construction underway on the Brewing Heritage Trail. The $5 million project will include a 2.3-mile trail as well as a website and mobile app.
 
The trail will tell the story of Cincinnati’s beer culture by showcasing the city’s historic breweries and taverns through a series of plaques and murals. A number of the buildings that have served as breweries and taverns over the years are currently in use today by new breweries like Rhinegeist and reborn breweries like Christian Moerlein.
 
The trail will be split into three segments and will begin in Pendleton and wind its way through Over-the-Rhine and into the Mohawk area. Three murals depicting Cincinnati’s brewing history are located at 25 Back St., 1625 Central Parkway and 131 E. McMicken St. in Over-the-Rhine.
 
Construction is expected to begin on the middle segment in early 2017. The middle segment will showcase the history of lager, an industry that began in Cincinnati, and the bars and saloons that played important roles in the city’s politics and history.
 
The first segment of the trail will tell the story of Cincinnati’s early brewers and the cultural background of the English, French, Germans and Irish who settled the city. The third segment will focus on the growth of the city’s breweries and how they began shipping beer all over the world.
 
The website and mobile app, which were made possible by a grant from the Haile Foundation, are expected to launch this fall. They’ll help guide people through the trail as well as provide additional information.
 

Five Cincinnati projects receive over $9 million in state historic tax credits


The Ohio Development Services Agency recently awarded $27.8 million in state historic tax credits. Twenty-six organizations across the state plan to rehab a total of 39 buildings, which on the state level, will leverage about $261.4 million in private investment.
 
Many of the buildings that received Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits in this round are vacant and generate little to no economic activity.
 
Five high-profile projects in Cincinnati received a total of just over $9.3 million in state historic tax credits.  
 
Crosley Building, 1333 Arlington St., Camp Washington
Received $5 million in tax credits
Built in 1930 by Samuel Hannaford and Sons, 1333 Arlington housed the headquarters of the Crosley Radio Corporation. The nine-story, 300,000-square-foot building (and an adjacent building) will be redeveloped into 324 market-rate apartments. This is the first state historic tax credit awarded to Camp Washington.
 
Film Center Building, 1632 Central Parkway, Over-the-Rhine
Received $1.07 million in tax credits
In its heyday, the Film Center Building was one of several buildings in OTR that served the film industry. Urban Sites plans to redevelop the first floor of the now vacant building into office and restaurant space. The upper floors will house 46 rental units with a mixture of studio, and one- and two-bedroom apartments.
 
Market Square II, 1807-1830 Elm St., 127 Findlay St., 1827 Logan St., OTR
Received $1.7 million in tax credits
The second phase of Model Group’s Market Square will include the renovation of 10 historic buildings, as well as one new build. This phase of the project will include 55 apartments, plus 24,000 square feet of ground-floor commercial space.
 
Strietmann Biscuit Company Building, 223-235 W. 12th St., OTR
Received $1.2 million in tax credits
Built in 1899, these buildings used to house the Strietmann Biscuit Company. After the company moved to a new facility in the 1940s, the building became home to a number of mixed-use and small businesses. It now sits vacant, but Grandin Properties plans to rehabilitate it into office space for 10-15 businesses, with a first-floor restaurant space.
 
771 and 772 E. McMillan St., Walnut Hills
Received $250,000 in tax credits
Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation and a few private developers will be working to redevelop three buildings, two of which are historic. The Hamilton Building, located at 771 McMillan, was built in 1883 as a single-family residence. It was converted into apartments, and has been vacant since 1981. 772 McMillan is a mixed-use building with three commercial spaces on the ground floor and apartments above; the apartments have been vacant since the mid-1970s, and the ground floor since 2004. Plans include seven apartments and a restaurant or bar at street level. The third, non-historic building is 2504 Chatham St., which will see the rehabilitation of six vacant apartments.
 
 
 

Plans announced for The Skeleton Root, the second winery coming to Over-the-Rhine


In the 1800s, prominent lawyer and banker Nicholas Longworth helped develop the Cincinnati hillsides into vineyards, which were known for growing Catawba grapes. By the 1850s, before California was a state, the Ohio River Valley was the largest grape growing region in the country.

The Civil War and the temperance movement hurt Cincinnati’s grape growing industry, and it hasn’t seen a rebirth until now.
 
The Skeleton Root is the second new winery — along with Revel OTR — that has been announced for Over-the-Rhine. The Skeleton Root will be located just east of Rhinegeist Brewery at 38 W. McMicken Ave.
 
Before the space on McMicken, The Skeleton Root had a small cellar space on Court Street downtown. Kate MacDonald converted a garage into a winery/cellar space, where she made the winery’s Vintage 2014, which will be released once The Skeleton Root opens. The 2015 harvest was done in the new space.
 
“Over-the-Rhine chose me in a way,” MacDonald says. “This area of the neighborhood is prime for development, with so many large warehouses that could be converted to produce interesting things.”
 
Engineer by trade, MacDonald has lived and worked in wineries in Napa Valley as well as locally at Valley Vineyards in Morrow. After moving back to Cincinnati, she knew she wanted to open a winery.
 
“I love the history of the city, and I’m intrigued by the wine history and how deep and prominent of a region this was pre-Prohibition,” she says. “My goal is to retell the story of the heritage we had, and demonstrate the ability to make it a great grape region again.”
 
The Skeleton Root will produce all of its wines on-site from grapes straight from local vineyards. Grapes will be harvested and crushed on-site too.
 
All of the wine-making areas will be accessible to the public in order to give people a connection with the process. A 1,500-square-foot barn located just beyond the tasting room will hold all of The Skeleton Root’s barrels for aging and will lead into the actual winery.
 
The tasting room won’t be like a typical winery where customers belly up to the bar to taste and buy bottles of wine to take home. The main room, which will be about 2,000 square feet, will be like a comfortable living room with communal seating, couches, laptop bars and Internet. An upstairs loft area will serve as overflow for the tasting room.
 
“We want people to come in and stay a while,” MacDonald says.
 
The Skeleton Root will also hold events in the barrel barn, winemaking space and separate conference room for off-site corporate meetings.
 
All wines served in the tasting room will be The Skeleton Root’s own wines, but MacDonald also plans to support local craft beer. There won’t be a food menu, but she wants to work with local chefs and food trucks to offer demos that focus on pairing food and wine.
 
The Skeleton Root will have heritage wines from the American Grapes, including a Heritage Catawba and Norton. MacDonald focuses on classic wine production with minimal intervention, which preserves a higher acidity level and has more pronounced fruit. There will be other wine programs too, with a focus on French and European style wines.
 

Local winemakers take their hobby to the next level with OTR winery and wine bar


Winemaking is in Anthony Maieron’s blood. His parents are from Italy, and when they moved to the U.S. his father continued to make wine in the garage.

“I remember all of my dad’s friends coming over and crushing the grapes together and telling stories,” Maieron says. “When I moved back to the area after college, my dad asked me if I wanted to take over the winemaking, and I’ve been making it in Cincinnati for 12 years now.”
 
He and his wife Jodi, along with friends John and Amy Coleman and vintner Alex Sena, have turned that Italian winemaking tradition into Revel OTR, an urban boutique winery and wine bar. Their goal is to create a space that makes wine more approachable while still sticking true to the old-school Italian winemaking process.
 
“Everyone in Over-the-Rhine is focusing on making food and drink accessible,” Maieron says. “There’s this perception of wine being an upperclass drink or for the older demographic, but we’re really breaking down those barriers and showing younger people that wine is for them too.”
 
They purchased a building at 111 E. 12th St. so they could really invest in the community. Wine production will be in the basement, which has the capacity to hold 44 barrels at a time. The first floor will have a wine bar and high-top tables as well as a rail along the outside wall. The second floor will be a more intimate space with casual seating.
 
Phase II, which Maieron hopes to have ready by next summer, will be a rooftop terrace with additional seating.
 
Revel OTR’s interior will have a raw and rustic feel with many of the building’s original aspects intact, including the stone cellar walls, exposed brick and plaster and hardwood floors. The bar was also custom-made from salvaged material in the building.
 
“We’ve done much of the salvage work ourselves and have salvaged everything possible from the building to preserve that historic character,” Maieron says. “We wanted to restore the building and bring it back to life while reusing elements of the building.”
 
The Maierons and the Colemans want to create a sense of environment that caters to everyone. Revel OTR will be somewhere people can meet up for a glass of wine before or after dinner or enjoy a bottle while waiting for a table at a Vine or Main street restaurant.
 
Revel OTR will showcase other small-batch, family-owned wineries. It’s hard for small wineries to sell their product at big box stores and still have it be affordable and turn a profit, so Maieron wants to be able to give exposure to those wineries and build partnerships.
 
Revel OTR plans to open in late August or early September with up to six of their own wines available, including their flagship Sangiovese, with an average bottle price of $26. On any given day, there will be about 20 different wines available by the bottle, carafe, juice glass or flight.
 
There won’t be an extensive food menu, but Maieron plans to serve traditional Italian wine accompaniments like olives, meats and cheeses.
 

Artichoke cookware store hosting series of cooking classes, demos


Artichoke has been open north of Findlay Market for only about 12 weeks, but owners Brad and Karen Hughes have already had an overwhelming number of inquiries about cooking classes. But they’ve offered only demonstrations so far, not structured classes.
 
“We’ve done a number of different demos, including brunch, ice cream and strawberry pie,” Karen says. “All of the demos have featured the products we sell and talked about the basics of preparing the dishes, but nothing real in-depth.”
 
On June 25, Artichoke will host its first summer school cooking class, which will be taught by Chef Anthony Jordan of Invito Personal Chef. Jordan worked under Jean-Robert de Cavel for a few years and then started his own company to focus on healthy eating and tailoring menus and meals to his clients’ dietary needs.
 
“Findlay Market is a resource no one else in the region has, and it’s so great to be able to partner with the vendors and show it off for this class,” Brad says.
 
The class will meet at Artichoke and then walk over to Findlay Market, where Jordan will introduce students to market vendors and talk about ingredients. Then the class will go to Market Wines, where they will learn how to select a wine pairing for the menu and purchase a bottle to go with their meal. Back at Artichoke, Jordan will lead the cooking demo around a four-course light summer menu.
 
The cooking class will be held 4:30-8:30 p.m. and is $65 per person. If you’re interested, contact Brad and Karen at 513-263-1002 or visit Artichoke, 1824 Elm St., to reserve your spot. The class is limited to 10 people.
 
The goal is to host one cooking class per month, Karen says. But there are a number of other opportunities to come in and see something being prepared in Artichoke’s demo kitchen. A free Father’s Day demo and tasting of bulletproof coffee, which is made with coconut oil and butter, is scheduled for 11 a.m. June 19.
 
Artichoke partnered with concert:nova for a demo of Julia Child’s Le Gateau au Chocolate, which is being featured in the organization’s one-woman opera Bon Appetit! The demo is at 4 p.m. July 17; tickets are $30 and are available here.
 

ArtWorks adding 23 more murals to Cincinnati this summer


ArtWorks staff and youth apprentices will work on 23 mural projects around Great Cincinnati this summer. A project kickoff will be held on June 20 on Pleasant Street in front of the future home of the Rosemary Clooney mural.
 
New murals coming to a wall near you this summer include:
 
Annie “Little Sure Shot” Oakley Mural, 3211 Madison Road, Oakley
The mural will pay homage to Annie Oakley, who performed in a number of sharp shooter contests in Cincinnati (though Oakley is not named for her). It’s supported by Voltage Furniture and Vandercar Holdings, and the community can donate to a matching funds campaign with Sara M. and Michelle Vance Waddell here.
 
Female Legend Vote Mural, 1606 Pleasant St., Over-the-Rhine
This mural will honor singer and actress Rosemary Clooney, who was born in Maysville, Ky., and won a spot to sing on WLW radio with her sister Betty back in the 1940s. The mural will be part of the Cincinnati Legends Series, is in partnership with 3CDC and is supported by School Outfitters. The community can donate to a matching funds campaign with 1919 Investment Counsel here.
 
Kennedy Heights Art Center Annex Mural, 6620 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights
Lead artist Casey Millard and 14 youth apprentices will create a multi-medial mural on the facade of the new Carl, Robert, Richard and Dorothy Lindner Annex at KHAC. The community can donate to a matching funds campaign with American Scaffolding here.
 
Prost to Cincinnati Installation Series
ArtWorks once again partnered with the Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation on this series of six murals that will help drive development along the Brewing Heritage Trail. The multi-media pieces will depict love and honor for the city’s brewing history and will be installed by a variety of artists. The community can donate to a matching funds campaign through Power2Give here.
 
Walnut Hills “This Is 5 Points” Mural, 2429 Gilbert Ave., Walnut Hills
This is the final mural in a series of five wayfinding pieces that identify and enliven the redeveloped Five Points Alley. It will be completed in partnership with BLDG.
 
Winsor McCay Mural, 917 Main St., OTR
McCay moved to Cincinnati in 1891 and created the first comic strip for The Enquirer in 1903. Panels from his most famous cartoon, “Little Nemo,” will be recreated on the Main Street building in partnership with 917 Partners. The mural is part of the Cincinnati Masters Mural Series, along with work by Charley Harper, John Ruthven and Tom Wesselmann.
 
Other mural projects this summer include a new Cincinnati Heritage Series that honors Kenner Products and the city’s toy design history; an art installation in the main lobby of Duke Energy Convention Center that will explore the theme of Cincinnati or the Ohio River; and a mural by local artist Jim Effler that will span two walls on Central Parkway to depict the creation of Ohio’s canal system.
 
Through a partnership with Keep Cincinnati Beautiful, ArtWorks also plans to create 12 new murals — New Lines OTR Alleyways Project — in Over-the-Rhine alleyways in an area bordered by Main, 13th, Sycamore and Liberty streets. The goal is to transform the more neglected spaces into works of art while making the alleys safe and more walkable.
 

Small-batch distilleries making a comeback across Greater Cincinnati


Before and after Prohibition, there were around 80 distilleries in Over-the-Rhine alone. And just like breweries, distilleries exited the Cincinnati market until recently.

Small batch distilleries are now cropping up all around the city, and the majority of them are focusing on tasting room offerings and local retail sales.
 
A bill was passed on the state level recently to allow craft distilleries to obtain A1 liquor permits and allow the sale of mixed drinks and food on-site, much like breweries and brewpubs. Changes may be coming to some of Cincinnati's distilleries in the form of craft cocktails available in house, but for now you can find their offerings in area liquor stores and bars as well as in a few of their taprooms.
 
New Riff, 24 Distillery Way, Newport
Open since May 2014, New Riff has made a name for itself in the world of small-batch distilling. It uses two different stills — a 500-gallon pot still and a hand-operated column still — to create gin, bourbon and rye. Distillery tours are free Thursday-Sunday.

Henry Street Brewery & Distillery, 108 Henry St., Over-the-Rhine
Located in part of the old Christian Moerlein complex, Henry Street will be the first brewery, distillery and winery in the city of Cincinnati since Prohibition. The distillery’s opening date remains to be determined.
 
Northside Distilling Co., 1326-B Springlawn Ave., Northside
Northside Distilling started distributing its corn whiskey a year ago, but the small-batch distillery was able to double its output in January and now can make 8-12 cases per week. New offerings include bourbon and craft vodka. They opened a tasting room where customers can try samples and purchase liquor to go. Call 513-549-3831 to set up a tour.
 
OTR Still House/Knox Joseph Distillery, 1820 Central Parkway, Over-the-Rhine
A new venture from the owners of PetWants, the OTR Still House will open in a 117-year-old, 17,000-square-foot warehouse and will produce gin, whiskey and bourbon. The building will also be a venue for live music and entertainment and will be available for rent. It will also serve as warehouse space for PetWants production. An opening date hasn’t been set yet, but keep tabs on the distillery’s Facebook page for more information.
 
Second Sight Spirits, 301 B Elm St., Ludlow
Started by two Cirque du Soleil alums, Second Sight is all about helping to build community — the distillery often hosts on-site corporate functions and charity events. Known for its rum, Second Sight also launched Villa Hillbillies Moonshine in April. Free tours and tastings are available Thursday-Sunday.
 
Queen City Whiskey a.k.a. George Remus
Named after George Remus, King of Bootleggers, the whiskey is distilled locally and has been introduced to liquor stores and select bars throughout the region. They’ve even partnered with local breweries to create unique beer styles with bourbon characteristics.
 
Woodstone Creek, 4712 Vine St., St. Bernard
Known as Ohio’s first microdistillery, Woodstone Creek recently moved from a shared space with Listermann Brewing to its own location. Liquor offerings include Barrelhouse, Cincinnati Vodka, Murray Cask Peated Single Malt Whisky and Ridge Runner 5-Grain. The tasting room is open 2-7 p.m. Saturdays if you’re interested in a sample or a tour.
 

Adaptive reuse development helps promote bicycle-centered lifestyle in Pendleton


With the addition of bicycle lanes around the city, ride services like Lyft and Uber and the coming streetcar, more people are turning in their car keys for bike helmets. Many local businesses are jumping on board too and are teaming up with organizations like ArtWorks to help design bike racks.
 
A new Pendleton apartment building — designed, developed and rehabilitated by BiLT Architects — is the first to be named an official “Bicycle Friendly Destination” by Queen City Bike. Located at 512 E. 12th St., Abigail@512e12 has a number of amenities that make it bicycle-friendly.
 
Dedicated bicycle lockers are available for tenants, and there is also a fully outfitted bicycle workstation complete with bicycle stand, pump and repair tools. Tenants can also purchase a membership to Cincy Red Bike for half price.
 
Abigail@512e12 is a member of Queen City Red Bike, and tenants can enjoy the organization’s membership benefits as well.
 
There are no dedicated on-street parking spots for tenants, which helps promote a more bicycle-centered lifestyle.
 
The seven one-bedroom apartments began pre-leasing in April and should be move-in ready within a few weeks. Rent ranges from $840 to $880 per month, or $1.50-$1.60 per square foot.
 

Outdoor bar and beer garden to be first along Central Parkway bike lane


Queen City Radio will open this summer in the former automotive service and repair shop at the corner of Central Parkway and West 12th Street. But it’s not a radio station — it’s an outdoor beer garden.
 
The auto body shop also installed car and satellite radio systems, and the new QCR will celebrate that history by keeping the name.  
 
Louisa Reckman and Gabriel Deutsch, her brother and business partner, think another outdoor dining and drinking space in Over-the-Rhine will do well, and they want to pay homage to their German heritage.
 
“Both Gabriel and I have dual citizenship, and I lived in Germany for over 12 years,” Reckman says. “I actually had my first sip of beer in a Dusseldorf beer garden.”
 
Environmental remediation on the property began last June, and historic and building permits were issued in March. Reckman and Deutsch have been working on the building ever since.
 
QCR will feature gas fire pits, wooden tables and benches, lots of greenery and garage doors that will open when the weather permits. Reckman says it will be a place to tailgate or watch a game as well as enjoy a pint with friends, family, coworkers and pets.
 
“We hope to bring a sense of community and celebrate Cincinnati’s beer culture while restoring a local landmark,” she says.
 
QCR also plans to dedicate one day each week to help promote and support local charities, nonprofits and other causes. It will also be the only bar/beer garden located directly on the Central Parkway protected bike lane.
 
“I hope we are an integral oasis and rest stop for the local bicycling community as well,” Reckman says.
 
As for the menu, there will be a rotating list of local, regional and national best-selling beers as well as a full bar with wine, cocktails and boozy slushies. Beers will include 50 West, Blank Slate, Braxton Brewing, Listermann’s, MadTree, Moerlein, Rhinegeist, Rivertown and Taft’s Ale House as well as national brands.
 
Beer and wine will also be available to go, and QCR is also working with 53T Courier to offer a beer and wine delivery service.
 
Keep tabs on QCR’s Facebook page for updates.
 

Panino food truck owner opening restaurant in OTR


Another food truck owner is adding the title of “restaurant owner” to his resume. Nino Loreto, who started serving charcuterie and artisanal sandwiches to Cincinnatians in 2013, plans to open a brick-and-mortar location for Panino in the Union Hall facility at 1315 Vine St. in Over-the-Rhine.
 
Loreto is committed to sourcing meat and produce locally, and his menu will feature handmade, cured meats. His food truck has had a presence at Taste of Cincinnati for the past two years and has also appeared at a number of events around the city.  
 
The casual deli/restaurant will feature a meat counter serving made-on-site salami and charcuterie. The menu will be small, with the option to dine at Panino’s patio or take it to go. There will also be a bar and dining room that will be open for dinner. That menu will include wine and craft beer as well as charcuterie plates, crostinis, bruschetta, paninis and a small selection of entrees.
 
Loreto hasn’t announced an opening date for Panino yet, since once the meat processing facility is set up a number of the meats will take several months to cure.
 

Cincinnati Public Schools announcement puts Vision 2020 plans into motion


Seven Cincinnati Public Schools are getting updated curriculum for the next school year, the first changes in a five-year plan, called Vision 2020, to help bring greater equity, access and opportunity for all district students.
 
Traditionally, CPS has been divided into magnet schools and neighborhood schools. Magnets are harder to get into and often involve a citywide lottery for admission, while neighborhood school enrollment is based on where students live. Vision 2020 intends to break down these divisions and add specialty programming to neighborhood schools as well as some magnet schools.
 
Next year, Chase Elementary School in Northside and Woodford Paideia Academy in Kennedy Heights will have new art and culture programs. With the new fine arts initiative throughout the district, students at Chase will play in a band and students at Woodford will play in an orchestra.
 
An environmental science program will be enacted at Pleasant Hill Academy in College Hill. The school has access to about 18.5 acres of green space, and students will spend a lot of time learning outside.
 
A high-tech program will start at Hays-Porter Elementary in the West End, which will include online learning paired with traditional learning, and students will begin studying coding, robotics and gaming.
 
A gifted program will begin at Cheviot Elementary School, much like the gifted program at Hyde Park School. Student enterprise programs will also start at Rothenberg Preparatory Academy in Over-the-Rhine and Westwood Elementary School, where students will learn marketing and networking skills while designing and building new products.
 
Vision 2020 will expand during the 2017-18 school year and beyond, with other new programs starting across the district. A few ideas include building a high school ROTC program and creating a gender-based elementary school.
 
Program costs are being figured into CPS’ budget, but specific numbers won’t be available until May when the district presents its annual budget. 
 

Entrepreneurs utilize Findlay Market to develop sandwich shop concept


Josh Dickerson and Tyler Retyi-Gazda have something in common: Their pipe dream is to open a restaurant. But before that happens, they’re looking to get honest feedback about their restaurant concept, Grind on the Rhine, which served at Findlay Market for the first time on April 16.
 
“Our concept involves cooking on the spot,” Dickerson says. “We’re focusing on fresh food and fresh ingredients.”
 
When dreaming up their concept, Dickerson and Retyi-Gazda knew that renting commercial kitchen space would be expensive, so they turned to Findlay Kitchen as a cost-effective alternative to make their dream happen.
 
The focus of Grind on the Rhine is po’ boys, a sandwich invented in New Orleans during a streetcar strike. With the streetcar coming soon to Over-the-Rhine and downtown, Dickerson and Retyi-Gazda thought po’ boys belonged in Cincinnati too. 
 
Ideally, Grind on the Rhine’s storefront will open within the year, but Dickerson says they want to focus on perfecting their menu first. That menu is small right now, but once a brick-and-mortar restaurant opens it will be expanded upon.
 
The Showcase Grinder is shaved sirloin, caramelized onion, arugula and honey mustard on a ciabatta baguette from Shadeau Breads. Another menu highlight is the Pulled Pork Shoulder, which is pulled pork shoulder topped with a mango habandero BBQ sauce and apple slaw, also on a ciabatta baguette from Shadeau. There’s also a Chicken Muffeleta, which is ham and salami finished with an olive tapanade.
 
Grind on the Rhine also has an All-Day Breakfast, which is bacon and egg that can be topped with tomato and arugula. All of the seasonings and sauces are made from scratch by Retyi-Gazda, who is the chef. Sides include homemade Saratoga chips made from sweet potatoes and purple potatoes and rice and quinoa with walnuts, craisins and lemon zest.
 
Dickerson says right now they’re focused on serving on weekends at Findlay Market until they get their sandwiches perfected, and then they’ll expand from there.
 

Neighborhood eateries are jumping on the outdoor dining bandwagon


Arnold’s Bar and Grill has been around since 1861, and with that long history comes a number of firsts, such as being one of downtown’s first outdoor dining spots. The courtyard between the two buildings has a retractable roof allowing the space to be open pretty much year-round.
 
Many other Greater Cincinnati restaurants have followed Arnold’s lead and now offer sidewalk, patio or rooftop dining. These are just a few of our favorites. Where do you go for outdoor eating?  
 
Downtown
One of Cincinnati’s newer restaurants, Americano Burger Bar, opened its patio just in time for baseball season. Plus it’s the only restaurant in the 84.51 building with outdoor seating. 545 Race St.
 
Over-the-Rhine
Che, which opened in January, recently added a tree-lined patio to its offerings. 1342 Walnut St.
 
Krueger’s Tavern is the only restaurant in OTR with rooftop dining. The space offers diners respite from the often-crowded neighborhood restaurants. 1211 Vine St.
 
Lachey’s Bar is known for its food as well as multiple TVs airing sporting events. Soon it will also be known for its patio, which is still under construction but slated to open soon. 56 E. 12th St.
 
Just when you thought Rhinegeist couldn’t get any better, they went and built a rooftop deck complete with a bar. The space is huge and includes heaters and great views of OTR. 1910 Elm St.
 
Uptown
Hang Over Easy boasts a back deck and lawn located between it and Bogart’s. Most days it’s just a lawn, but during special events it can host bands and different programming. 13 W. Charlton St., Corryville.
 
Mecklenburg Gardens, which recently celebrated 150 years in business, is the oldest operating restaurant in the area. Its outdoor beer garden has become a mainstay for regulars and newcomers alike. 302 E. University Ave., Corryville.
 
Northside
Under new ownership, Django Western Taco has seen some changes, but the back patio remains the same. Kick back, relax and enjoy a margarita and some tacos. 4046 Hamilton Ave.
 
The Littlefield is home to a wide variety of bourbon and small plates as well as a multi-level patio complete with fire pits for chilly nights. 3934 Spring Grove Ave.
 
Melt’s eclectic menu and community atmosphere pour out into its semi-covered patio at the back of the restaurant. 4165 Hamilton Ave.
 
Price Hill
Incline Public House sits at the top of the old incline route up into Price Hill, and so its covered outdoor patio offers great views of downtown and Northern Kentucky. 2601 W. Eighth St.
 
Hyde Park
The patio at Dutch’s has a backyard feel to it, complete with fire pits and a bocce court. You’ll feel like you’re having a cookout at home but somebody else made the burgers. 3378 Erie Ave.
 
Mt. Adams
The Rookwood’s multi-level deck, firepit and swings for adults adds to the historic charm of the former pottery factory, plus the patio has a great view of downtown. 1077 Celestial St.
 
Columbia-Tusculum
Pearl’s Bar doesn’t serve food, but its large outdoor patio surrounded by pine trees makes it just right for beer drinking. 3520 Eastern Ave.
 
East End
Eli’s BBQ has a backyard, lawn and picnic tables, which make lunch or dinner into a real picnic. If you’re there on the right night, you might catch some live music. 3313 Riverside Dr.
 
Newport
Hofbrauhaus is all German, inside and out. If you have a big group, head to the outdoor beer garden, where there’s additional seating and a lot more standing room. 200 E. Third St.

Pompilio's patio is home to the best bocce court in town, with the new season getting ready to start, and hosts live music on weekends. 600 Washington Ave.
 
532 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts