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Evanston / Norwood : Development News

26 Evanston / Norwood Articles | Page: | Show All

Towne Properties adding second phase to DeSales Flats project

A new $13.5 million apartment project is in the works from Towne Properties: Phase II of DeSales Flats at the northwest corner of Lincoln and Woodburn avenues on the Evanston/Walnut Hills border.

Listermann partnering with Renegade Street Eats for permanent cafe within brewery

Renegade Street Eats, a local food truck, plans to open a brick-and-mortar cafe this summer in the newly renovated Listermann Brewing facility across from Xavier University.

Oregon brewery brings mobile beer bar to Cincinnati

Greater Cincinnati will host Oregon-based Deschutes Brewery's 29-foot-long, 3-ton traveling bar, Woody, at several stops Wednesday through Saturday.

New donut bar joins lineup at Xavier's University Station development

Top This Donut Bar, a new Cincinnati-based donut shop, brings customization to a whole new level at University Station near Xavier University's campus.

Another food truck on the horizon in Cincinnati

John Humphrey’s parents opened the first Zino’s restaurant in 1965, but they closed in the mid-1990s. Now Humphrey is bringing some of Zino’s menu back to the city with his food truck, Zinomobile.

Funds granted to clean up vacant gas stations and auto repair shops

Three area communities were recently awarded Urban Land Assistance Program grants for the redevelopment of vacant and underutilized gas stations and auto repair shops.

New mixed-use development in the works near Xavier

Xavier University’s bookstore, Starbucks and Graeter’s are the first retail tenants to sign leases for University Station, a new development near Xavier.

Nourish Yourself offers healthy, home-cooked meals to busy clients

After a 15-year career with P&G, Cherylanne Skolnicki became a certified health coach and started teaching people how to eat better. In January 2011, she started Nourish Yourself, a service that will cook dinner for you.

Cincinnati Children's plans to reopen Harrison health center

The Cincinnati Children’s health center in Harrison, which was operated by Neighborhood Health Care Inc., was one of four locations closed at the end of 2013. But there are plans to reopen the center on a temporary basis.

Neighborhood Asset Mapping tool focuses on neighborhoods' strengths

The Community Building Institute recently partnered with Xavier University and the United Way to develop and launch the Neighborhood Asset Mapping tool as a resource for all 52 Cincinnati neighborhoods.

New online tool aims to keep Cincinnati residents engaged in their neighborhoods

On July 24, the City of Cincinnati adopted Nextdoor, a free, private social network for you, your neighbors and your community. The goal is to improve community engagement between the City and its residents, and foster neighbor-to-neighbor communications.
 
Each of Cincinnati’s 52 neighborhoods will have its own private Nextdoor neighborhood website, which is accessible only to residents of that neighborhood. City administrations and several city departments will also use Nextdoor to share important news, services, programs, free events and emergency notifications to residents, but they won’t be able to see who is registered to use the site or the conversations among residents.
 
Founded in 2010 in San Francisco, Nextdoor’s mission is to bring back a sense of community to the neighborhood. The site was tested in 175 neighborhoods across the country, and results showed that neighborhoods had some of the same issues, plus a variety of different issues.
 
“We all remember what our neighborhood experience was like as kids, when everyone knew each other, looked out for one another and stayed in the community longer," says Sarah Leary, co-founder of Nextdoor. “We want to invoke that nostalgia for neighborhoods.”
 
To date, Nextdoor is being used by about 17,000 neighborhoods across the country. In June, Nextdoor partnered with New York City and Mayor Bloomberg to communicate with the city’s 8.3 million residents. The site plans to roll out in other major cities like Cincinnati over the course of the next several months.
 
Nextdoor also recently released its iPhone app. “We’re really putting the lifeline of the neighborhood into the palm of the residents’ hands,” says Leary. “The common thread is an interest in using technology to make connections with neighbors. But it doesn’t stop there—once people have an easy way to communicate, they’re more likely to get together in the real world.”
 
You can sign up for Nextdoor on its website, or download the app in the App Store.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Dance, movement, art shape The Shakti Factory

Looking for a place to let loose and dance? Then The Shakti Factory is for you.
 
The Shakti Factory is a movement studio, gathering place and dynamic learning community that is focused on creativity, freedom, embodied spirituality and evolutionary human potential. Owners Meredith Hogan and Lisa Stegman wanted a place for themselves to dance and gather, but they couldn’t find anywhere that fit their needs in Cincinnati. They opened their business in December near Xavier University.
 
“We want to continue to build a tribe of dancers and help set our bodies into a healing, natural rhythm,” says Hogan.
 
“Shakti” is defined as the divine, feminine power that animates and brings life to everything that is.
 
But The Shakti Factory isn’t just a place for performance artists. The studio is currently displaying a print show by Hans Waller; he also painted a mural on one of the walls. In the future, Hogan and Stegman want to host art shows regularly.
 
“It’s about pushing boundaries, and offering things that aren’t found elsewhere in town,” says Stegman. There are plans for salons that will create conversation about subjects like sexual health.
 
The Shakti Factory currently offers three dance classes each week. In July, Hogan will be adding a yoga class to the studio’s offerings. There will also be one-time workshops, such as the Warrior 101 yoga class in August that will be taught by a friend.
 
“Our vision of the space is a flexible concept that is always evolving,” says Stegman. “It might not be the same next year because it will always be changing.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Catch-A-Fire Pizza truck partners with local breweries

For 15 years, Jeff Ledford ran some of the finest restaurants in Cincinnati. But in February, he and his wife Melissa turned a culinary dream into a reality when they opened their food truck, Catch-A-Fire Pizza.
 
Jeff has a degree from Cincinnati State’s Midwest Culinary Institute, and trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park and Napa Valley. Besides fine dining, he’s also worked in catering.
 
The truck is a 26-foot mobile kitchen that features a wood-fired oven that reaches temperatures of up to 800 degrees. The Ledfords use fresh ingredients and are very selective about the flour, cheese, sauce and toppings they use on their pizzas, Jeff says.
 
“We wanted to bring our product, our passion and our philosophy of food and beverage to people, which is a very gratifying experience,” he says.
 
Catch-A-Fire’s best-seller is the Cornerstone, which is a pepperoni pizza topped with a fire-roasted red sauce and a five-cheese blend. The truck also features specials that rotate regularly to keep the food interesting.
 
The Ledfords are passionate about food and beverage and appreciate craft beer, so they decided to partner with a few local breweries. Catch-A-Fire can be found at Rivertown Brewing, and they’ve done events at Mt. Carmel Brewing Company and Listermann Brewing.
 
“Pizza and beer are like ketchup and French fries—it’s a great combination everyone knows,” Jeff says. “Lots of breweries have taprooms, but they’re not able to offer food, which is where we come in.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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CiNBA hosts networking event for Cincinnati independent businesses

On March 27, the Greater Cincinnati Indpendent Business Alliance is hosting a workshop that will focus on the unseen benefits of nurturing and supporting local independent businesses.
 
“This event provides a unique opportunity to explore the beneficial impact an independent business alliance can provide Cincinnati and the community,” says Owen Raisch, CiNBA’s founder.
 
CiNBA was started in March 2012 Raisch visited the American Independent Business Alliance’s national conference. Since then, Raisch has been working with businesses around Xavier University, including Betta’s Italian Oven, Betta’s Café Cornetti, Center City Collision, Baxter's Fast Wheels, Listermann Brewing, Kleen Print Products, Cincinnati Cash Mob and Beans and Grapes.
 
All of CiNBA’s members except Center City Collision worked with Xavier students to assess business models and develop their businesses. Over 60 students were involved in classes that range from an MBA management project to undergraduate graphic design courses.
 
CiNBA is the recipient of a Fuel Cincinnati grant that funded Raisch’s trip to the AIBA conference, and paid for CiNBA’s first year of membership to the organization.
 
“The grant and membership to AIBA provided startup support and promotional materials that were critical to the current level of CiNBA’s development,” says Raisch. “I’m very appreciative of Fuel’s support. I couldn’t have done it without them.”
 
The workshop will feature a presentation by Jeff Milchen, founder and director of the first International Business Alliance. The free event will be held at Beans and Grapes in Pleasant Ridge at 8:15 a.m. Contact Raisch at 937-402-6596 for more information.

By Caitlin Koenig
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Bronte Bistro gets a makeover at Rookwood Commons

Coffee and a good book go hand-in-hand, but what about a good book and lunch? Joseph-Beth Booksellers at Rookwood Commons recently remodeled its full-service restaurant, Brontë Bistro, to better serve its customers.
 
Joseph-Beth opened at Rookwood Commons in 1986. At the time, the Bistro was a smaller component, and was added on to in the early 1990s. But there haven’t been any significant changes to the Bistro—until now.
 
The remodel began on Jan. 7, and was 99 percent complete as of Wednesday. The entire restaurant was gutted and remodeled, from the kitchen—where new equipment was put in, including a grill—to the front of the house—where there is now a coffee kiosk for customers on-the-go. Before renovations, the only entrance to the Bistro was through the bookstore; now, there’s a front entrance that is accessible from the parking lot.
 
“The remodel really adds more offerings to our customer base,” says Joseph-Beth Booksellers’ CEO Mark Wilson. “Our goal is to create an experience for our customers. We want them to find a place where they can broaden their perspective and deepen their thinking, and the bookstore and Bistro provide that now with a nicer ambiance.”
 
The Bistro’s menu isn’t going to change much, but there will be a few new entrees available for dinner, says John Gains, general manager of the Bistro. In April, the Bistro will roll out a new dinner menu, which will include about two-thirds of the Bistro’s favorite lunch offerings, plus the new dinner offerings.
 
A meeting space was also created at the far end of the Bistro, complete with presentation screen that has the ability to house 50 people for business meetings and community events. There’s also a smaller part of the large meeting room that seats 20.

"With the remodel, we wanted to make seating more comfortable," says Gains. "Before, the dining room was loud, but we put in booths and put a wall up between the restaurant and the kitchen so people would be able to enjoy a meal and have a conversation."
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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26 Evanston / Norwood Articles | Page: | Show All
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