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LIVE MAKE launch in Brewery District highlights ARCHinati Festival

Bradley Cooper knew about Maker Works in Ann Arbor and the TechShop franchise, as well as other independent spaces around the country that encourage DIYers and design professionals by providing tools, space and a supportive community.

So when he and fellow architect Paul Karalambo took on the job of creating a design competition to create such a space in Cincinnati's Brewery District, he understood its inherent importance. Creating a large space for shared tools and a budding entrepreneur community could not only assist current businesses and residents, but also entice new graduates to find ways to build their businesses in Cincinnati.

The result of that thinking is the LIVE•MAKE competition, an initiative of the local branch of the American Institute of Architects, which grew out of the updated zoning for the Brewery District's updated zoning: urban mix. 

"It's important to have an entity like this in the city for people to take advantage of," says Cooper, a Cincinnati native who graduated from UC's architecture program and received his Master's degree from University of Michigan. 

For now, the competition remains theoretical, Cooper says. Its official launch on Oct. 6. serves as the culmination of the week-long ARCHinati Festival, which includes a full slate of building-friendly events that start Sept. 28. 

The LIVE•MAKE kick-off at the Christian Moerlein Brewhouse on Moore Street features not only brewery district tours, but a sampling of local artistic and design-focused entrepreneurs whose work provides a glimpse into what LIVE•MAKE could become. Guests include members of the Losantiville Design CollectiveHIVE13 and Brazee Street Studios.

Reservations won't be accepted; the first 160 guests to arrive will get free tours and beverages courtesy of Christian Moerlein. "We want people to show up and be there for what's happening," Cooper says.

LIVE•MAKE designs have already been submitted from as far away as Texas and California, all before the competition's official launch, and months before the competition's Dec. 20 deadline, Cooper says.

"It's generating interest as a way of spurring development," he says. 

After winners are announced at the end of January, the local AIA chapter hopes to hold a celebration in the late spring. Gaining interest, and funding, could spur real-life development next year.

By Elissa Yancey
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